Wednesday, April 21st 2021

Cerebras Updates Wafer Scale Engine on 7 nm - 2.6 Trillion Transistors, 40 GB Onboard SRAM, 850,000 Cores, 12" Wafer

Cerebras has announced the successor to their record-breaking Wafer Scale Engine. The newly re-engineered Wafer Scale Engine 2 has been redesigned for TSMC's 7 nm manufacturing process - a severe improvement over the original's 16 nm. That Cerebras has moved on to TSMC's 7 nm for this giant, wafer-sized accelerator is telling of the confidence and state of yields on TSMC's 7 nm - if the process wasn't considered to be stable and guaranteeing incredibly good yields, I doubt such an effort would have been undertaken.
The updated Wafer Scale Engine 2 now packs a staggering 850,000 cores (compared to the original's 400,000); offers 40 GB of on-chip SRAM (up from 18 GB); 20 PetaBytes/s memory bandwidth (up from 9 PB/s), and 220 PB/s interconnect fabric speed (up from 100 PB/s). These improvements and increases have been achieved with the same power envelope as the original, set at a staggering 20 kW (system) and 15 kW (chip) power consumption. These are enabled by the much higher transistor density of 7 nm vs 16 nm, which enables 2.6 Trillion transistors on the Wafer Scale Engine 2 compared to a "paltry" 1.2 Trillion on the original, 16 nm version of it, whilst occupying the same 46,225 square millimeters (about 21.5 x 21.5 cm). Cerebras has one-upped itself, building upon what already had to be the most impressive feat of classical chip engineering.
Source: Tom's Hardware
Add your own comment

25 Comments on Cerebras Updates Wafer Scale Engine on 7 nm - 2.6 Trillion Transistors, 40 GB Onboard SRAM, 850,000 Cores, 12" Wafer

#1
CallandorWoT
that is one crazy stock photo with the dining utensils. what ballers. :rockout:
Posted on Reply
#3
mtcn77
I wonder how they connect it, is it like a sim card for a whole server deck?
Posted on Reply
#5
Vayra86
Careful now, Raja is carefully watching you, he's seeing potential to finally rival Nvidia chips.

Die size is after all just a detail.
Posted on Reply
#6
hat
Enthusiast
I heard about this before, but I still have no idea what these are being used for, or by who.
Posted on Reply
#7
Nordic
What kind of PPD could I get on WCG?
Posted on Reply
#8
P4-630


Reminds me, it's time for dinner.... :D
Posted on Reply
#9
Frank_100
.....but will it play Crysis.
Posted on Reply
#10
1d10t
It's been around for years(?) but I haven't heard anyone who uses it.
Posted on Reply
#11
xrror
I always love the idea of this, but they never have details on things like how they're going to package it (surely it's not just this naked slab - as sweet visually as that would be) and also things like thermals when you light up an entire silicon wafer at once.

That said, still love the idea.
Posted on Reply
#12
msimax
can it run cyberpunk lol
Posted on Reply
#13
windwhirl
lynx29that is one crazy stock photo with the dining utensils. what ballers. :rockout:
I bet that was entirely aimed at DR. Ian Cutress.
Posted on Reply
#14
XiGMAKiD
windwhirlI bet that was entirely aimed at Dr. Ian Cutress.
Posted on Reply
#16
Minus Infinity
Frank_100.....but will it play Crysis.
Crysis remastered in 8K with AA, and RT.
Posted on Reply
#17
windwhirl
Minus InfinityCrysis remastered in 8K with AA, and RT.
And 360 Hz.
Posted on Reply
#18
laszlo
need 4 of this to eat on them lol

i didn't found in their white papers how to clean them after
Posted on Reply
#19
randomUser
if the process wasn't considered to be stable and guaranteeing incredibly good yields, I doubt such an effort would have been undertaken
I think you wouldnt care that much about yields when you can sell single sheet system for million or more.
I mean, it costs like 50USD or so to print chips on single wafer, so even with 5% yield rate you would only need 20 wafers before you get the perfect one. Thats only a kilo of USD. Selling that perfect wafer for a million covers production costs for decades.
Posted on Reply
#20
not_my_real_name
randomUserI think you wouldnt care that much about yields when you can sell single sheet system for million or more.
I mean, it costs like 50USD or so to print chips on single wafer, so even with 5% yield rate you would only need 20 wafers before you get the perfect one. Thats only a kilo of USD. Selling that perfect wafer for a million covers production costs for decades.
Somewhere there was an article about the cost of the wafers. 7nm wafer cost $ 10k there. The design itself allows you to bypass problem areas. So, at this cost of the wafer, I think you are generally right about the latter statement.
Posted on Reply
#21
Fourstaff
15kw ... I wonder how efficient this chip is, compared to the conventional ones.
Posted on Reply
#22
Bytales
windwhirlAnd 360 Hz.
Rendered in software mode.
Posted on Reply
#23
Houd.ini
Fourstaff15kw ... I wonder how efficient this chip is, compared to the conventional ones.
0,018 W per core... seems pretty efficient.
Posted on Reply
#25
watzupken
Wow, that is one huge chip. You can basically put your pots and pans on it while its running to boil or cook something. :roll:
Posted on Reply
Add your own comment
Jul 1st, 2022 18:11 EDT change timezone

New Forum Posts

Popular Reviews

Controversial News Posts