Thursday, June 3rd 2021

Microsoft Announces New Event to Showcase "What's Next for Windows"

When Microsoft announced its Windows 10 operating system, the company set it to be a platform that would last for many years. Instead of the regular releases like we have seen in the past years with Windows XP, Vista, 7, and 8, Windows 10 is a bit different. Microsoft designed the OS to be a product that receives plenty of updates over the years, however, it is still the same project. We are, of course, wondering if we are going to get something different and will Microsoft develop a new OS that is a successor to the 10. It seems like we are about to find out what the Redmond company plans to do with its OS offerings in the upcoming Microsoft Event scheduled for June 24th.

Starting at 11 a.m. Eastern Time, you can tune in to watch the event and find out what the company plans to do. The event website says "Join us to see what's next for Windows". By saying this, we are sure to see some advancements coming to the OS, however, we are still guessing what that may be. You can watch the live stream on Microsoft's website on June 24th, which you can check out here.
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68 Comments on Microsoft Announces New Event to Showcase "What's Next for Windows"

#1
Caring1
Delusional may be the wrong word in that context, "guessing" seems more apt.
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#2
AleksandarK
Caring1
Delusional may be the wrong word in that context, "guessing" seems more apt.
Indeed.

Windows 11 when?:)
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#3
Frick
Fishfaced Nincompoop
"Bemused", "befuddled".
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#4
AusWolf
I for one, have been happy with an operating system that gets support over many years. If something works, don't try to fix it.

Also:
Windows 95: meh
Windows 98: good
Windows ME: meh
Windows XP: good
Windows Vista: meh
Windows 7: good
Windows 8: you can't pay me enough to use it
Windows 10: not bad
Windows ?: ...
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#5
beautyless
Extreamly boring with current windows 10 UI
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#6
Wirko
"Looking out my blue prison cell window"
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#7
Melvis
Still waiting for W10 to get out of Beta.....
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#8
stimpy88
Microsoft have forgotten so much about making an OS, that all they can do is keep bolting on buggy features nobody really uses, and a few new icons every 8 years.

Microsoft and OS's are pretty much at the same level as Intel, and them designing new CPU architectures on new manufacturing nodes.
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#9
Vayra86
Of all operating systems, I can't really fault MS for Windows being what it is. There is no hidden agenda behind it. Its an OS that tries its best to cater to all wishes of every different use case on the planet.

Good luck trying to do that better than MS is doing up unto this point. I also have my criticism of the company, its decisions, and its OS, but there is still much more to be said about it on the positive side.

And the negatives are somehow never truly game breakers either. Annoying at best - up to the point they make you work a bit to get things right. But you can get things right. Now pick up any other OS that is not a Linux distro, and try doing that. IOS, OSX, Android... you're not getting the amount of freedom Windows has to offer, nor its backwards compatibility, nor its 'canvas' upon which you can do whatever you damn well like to do.

Count your blessings, I say. And the best thing of it all: its a single-sided story where the interests have aligned. Even with MS focusing on cloud and services to replace local apps, the focus is still where it should be: people need an OS to do stuff, and all functionality they desire, even if it changes over time. Don't like that cloud? Get something else - or make it.

Note how the walled garden discussion and the gatekeeper problem has gone right over Microsoft's head too. They're watching, waiting and were never keen to chase the frontier of half-legal data acquisition like Google and other big tech companies do (alright, a few 'privacy settings' oopsies notwithstanding). Their being late to the big data party also fits right into the agenda of a serious partner that wants to focus on real things. Not whatever is fashion this day of the week. They'll last by doing so, and they're not reinventing themselves every two years to avoid legislation catching up.

TL DR I'll take MS and its Windows for granted ten times more easily than I do an Apple or Google built OS. The latter suffer from tremendous trust issues, while MS does not. Yes, Apple, you too, for being so utterly greedy and how it distorts your app distribution and vetting, plus your OS limitations. Google, you for being a laissez faire 'we don't really care' partner that leaves responsibility to others where it doesn't belong - this echoes in the very concept of Android and its distribution, upgrade policies, and security.
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#10
trparky
Here's to hoping that future updates aren't going to be guessing game as to if your system will be borked by an update.
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#11
Mindweaver
Moderato®™
I'm going to go ahead and call it. It will be called Windows Series X and Windows Series S. X will be the Pro version and S will be the Home version. It will be called Windows X for short. Of course I don't know for sure but this is what I'm guessing.
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#12
Wirko
Mindweaver
I'm going to go ahead and call it. It will be called Windows Series X and Windows Series S. X will be the Pro version and S will be the Home version. It will be called Windows X for short. Of course I don't know for sure but this is what I'm guessing.
Unlikely. "We have advanced from Windows Ten to Windows Ten, which is the biggest generational leap you have ever seen from us." Try to explain this to those activist investors.
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#13
Mindweaver
Moderato®™
Wirko
Unlikely. "We have advanced from Windows Ten to Windows Ten, which is the biggest generational leap you have ever seen from us." Try to explain this to those activist investors.
I don't think they even care anymore and I was being very facetious when I said X. lol I mean are they even counting anymore.. I think they would use X for the symbol and not as a roman numeral. I mean XBox didn't mean 10box.
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#14
moob
AusWolf
I for one, have been happy with an operating system that gets support over many years. If something works, don't try to fix it.

Also:
Windows 95: meh
Windows 98: good
Windows ME: meh
Windows XP: good
Windows Vista: meh
Windows 7: good
Windows 8: you can't pay me enough to use it
Windows 10: not bad
Windows ?: ...
I think you're being extremely generous with ME. That was, by far, the most unstable Windows OS I ever worked with.

And this is probably a minority opinion, but I think we often look back at XP with a bit of rose-tinted nostalgia glasses. It was a security nightmare, especially compared to newer versions of Windows, and there were a number of teething issues in that OS that paved the way for what we have now.
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#15
HisDivineOrder
I hope they name it Windows. No number.

That way I can hope they won't be releasing any more actual versions.
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#16
stimpy88
HisDivineOrder
I hope they name it Windows. No number.

That way I can hope they won't be releasing any more actual versions.
They said Windows 10 would be the last...
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#18
Easy Rhino
Linux Advocate
"What's next for Windows?" Linux.
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#19
Caring1
Easy Rhino
"What's next for Windows?" Linux.
I'm pretty sure they are already integrating support for that, so more than likely.
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#20
trparky
Caring1
I'm pretty sure they are already integrating support for that, so more than likely.
Would they abandon the NT kernel like that? I can't imagine the horror that software developers the world over will experience if that indeed is what's going to happen. It would be like what Apple did way back when they changed to Intel from PowerPC but ten times worse.
Posted on Reply
#21
Caring1
trparky
Would they abandon the NT kernel like that? I can't imagine the horror that software developers the world over will experience if that indeed is what's going to happen. It would be like what Apple did way back when they changed to Intel from PowerPC but ten times worse.
I doubt they will dump NT, just integrate Linux somehow.
Basic explanation here:
boxofcables.dev/no-microsoft-is-not-rebasing-windows-to-linux/
Posted on Reply
#22
T_Zel
trparky
Would they abandon the NT kernel like that? I can't imagine the horror that software developers the world over will experience if that indeed is what's going to happen. It would be like what Apple did way back when they changed to Intel from PowerPC but ten times worse.
Given the work they've done with WSL 2, they already have the ability to run both the Windows and Linux kernels on the same machine. If they go down the path of making next gen Windows a UNIX-like OS, they can potentially virtualize the NT kernel for compatibility with existing Windows apps much like they do with the Linux kernel now.

Microsoft has been doing an awful lot with Linux in the last few years, so it's a possibility they could go this route. It would be one hell of an undertaking though.
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#23
Aquinus
Resident Wat-man
Given the push for WSL2 and .NET Core, I would like to be optimistic and think that Microsoft might actually develop a POSIX-compliant OS. It's probably wishful thinking though.
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#24
T_Zel
Caring1
I doubt they will dump NT, just integrate Linux somehow.
Basic explanation here:
boxofcables.dev/no-microsoft-is-not-rebasing-windows-to-linux/
That was an interesting read, wish I had seen that before my previous comment. Having thought about it some more, I would also add licensing to the list of reasons why Microsoft wouldn't do it. I think charging money for a *nix version of Windows would be either extremely difficult or outright impossible from a licensing perspective. Most likely they would be forced into a support subscription model like Canonical or Red Hat. I'm sure Windows licensing is a decreasing slice of Microsoft's revenue pie, but I highly doubt it's a small enough number that they would consider jeopardizing it in this way.
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#25
trparky
T_Zel
I'm sure Windows licensing is a decreasing slice of Microsoft's revenue pie, but I highly doubt it's a small enough number that they would consider jeopardizing it in this way.
Considering that many of us got Windows 10 for free by upgrading from an earlier paid-for version of either Windows 7 or 8.x and the fact that Microsoft is still accepting older Windows 7 and 8.x license keys to install Windows 10 (at least, unofficially), I highly doubt that Microsoft is making much money on retail Windows at all. Most of Microsoft's operating cash flow comes from subscription services like Microsoft Azure, Microsoft Office 365, OneDrive, XBox Gold, Windows Server, Microsoft SQL, and other such subscription services. Retail Windows is very much like a single drop of rain falling in the Pacific ocean.
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