Thursday, September 23rd 2021

NZXT Announces C-Series Bronze PSUs

The new C Series Bronze power supplies offer stable and safe power to all types of builds. The new lineup of Bronze PSUs generates less heat, keeping your system running quietly and efficiently. Their reliable components make up a unit that is backed by a 5-year warranty—the NZXT C Series Bronze PSUs are here to get your build powered up without letting you down.
  • 80 Plus Bronze certified
  • Semi-modular design and durable sleeved main cables
  • Silent performance with reduced heat and fan RPM
  • 5-year warranty
  • Available in 550w, 650w, and 750w options.
MSRP Pricing
  • C550 Bronze: $79.99
  • C650 Bronze: $89.99
  • C750 Bronze: $99.99
Availability: USA: Q4 2021
Add your own comment

10 Comments on NZXT Announces C-Series Bronze PSUs

#1
Tardian
Why someone would attempt to save on a PSU defies logic? Gold + rated PSUs don't cost much from good brands.
Posted on Reply
#2
dirtyferret
TardianWhy someone would attempt to save on a PSU defies logic? Gold + rated PSUs don't cost much from good brands.
There is no mention of price so I'm not sure what you mean by "attempt to save". That said, getting a gold rating does not make a gold PSU better or worse than a bronze one and NZXT IMHO is a "good" PSU brand when you consider what brands actually do in PC hardware.
Posted on Reply
#3
Tardian
dirtyferretThere is no mention of price so I'm not sure what you mean by "attempt to save". That said, getting a gold rating does not make a gold PSU better or worse than a bronze one and NZXT IMHO is a "good" PSU brand when you consider what brands actually do in PC hardware.
The Gold + rating ensures a minimum of efficiency which translates to less heat, noise, longevity, and can be an indicator of manufacturing quality. Obviously one should check reviews before purchasing. Bronze was OK in 2008.

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/80_Plus
Posted on Reply
#4
dirtyferret
TardianThe Gold + rating ensures a minimum of efficiency which translates to less heat, noise, longevity, and can be an indicator of manufacturing quality. Obviously one should check reviews before purchasing. Bronze was OK in 2008.

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/80_Plus
I know what a gold rating is and your definition is completely inaccurate. A gold ratings, assuming it's not fake or a carry over, means a hand picked unit was able to hit certain efficiency levels as set by EPRI testing at room temperature (23c +/- 5c). Nothing more and nothing less.
Posted on Reply
#5
Post Nut Clairvoyance
This is ATX size PSU, which exact 80+ rating it has would not impact it's performance or longevity as long as it has the rating.
80+ rating is also a poor indicator for quality. It only assess the efficiency of the unit but not any of the important performance metrics such as ripple, hold up time, and most importantly it does not test any protection mechanisms. Many manufacturers release PSU that is only 80+ gold efficiency but performs poorly in both performance and safety metric.
Good example is gigabyte.
This is also a lower end PSU, so you will likely not be able to find significant savings in electricity cost.
Posted on Reply
#6
Tardian
The phrase don’t spoil the ship for a ha’p’orth, or a halfpennyworth, of tar means don’t risk the failure of a large project by trying to economise on trivial things.
It was originally to lose a sheep, or a hog, for a (half)pennyworth of tar, that is to say, for want of spending a trivial sum on tar—with reference to the use of tar to protect sores and wounds on sheep from flies.
wordhistories.net/2017/10/13/spoil-ship-haporth-tar/
My point is to buy the best and most efficient PSU that your build can afford. A GPU costs over $1,000.
Expensive is cheap in the long run. Mina
It is like buying substandard tyres or poor fuel for your car.

I am not saying these PSUs are of poor quality. I only build with Gold + rated PSUs or better, and trusted review sites have confirmed reasonable quality.
Posted on Reply
#7
juular
TardianMy point is to buy the best and most efficient PSU that your build can afford.
And i would repeat the counter point of @dirtyferret that efficiency doesn't mean a thing unless you literally count cents in your power bills. You can build a good 80+ Bronze or a bad 80+ Gold\Platinum PSU. A lot of examples out there. Not to mention that 80 Plus certification process itself is prone to manipulations. So it's irrelevant characteristic when picking a PSU. What's relevant is overall build quality (not just the presence of Japanese capacitors or lack of thereof), performance both shown by proper reviews and QC. If there are no reviews - don't buy.
Posted on Reply
#8
dirtyferret
TardianMy point is to buy the best and most efficient PSU that your build can afford.
This can often lead to a waste of money (it's up to the user themselves) but many people would be better off purchasing a quality PSU (based on quality independent reviews) that delivers the power their PC needs within the timeline of their needs.
TardianGold + rated PSUs or better, and trusted review sites have confirmed reasonable quality.
In this example the "trusted review site" confirms the Gold rating not the 80 plus badge which is what you seem to miss.

You can have a Gold rated PSU that will only do bronze efficiency in most gaming PCs because the badge testing is done at room temp as opposed to 40c or hotter like most PC gaming cases. A PSU with Gold rating at 25c is a much different PSU than one with gold rating at 40c or even 50c. So your Gold rated PSU can easily be a real word bronze one in 40c+ testing.

You can have a bronze PSU because sales needs a unit to compete with the other brands 40c Bronze line. Marketing material and boxes are created months before the OEM goes into production and upon testing that "Bronze was OK in 2008" unit, it ends up doing silver efficiency in independent 40c+ testing.

We haven't even mentioned things like proper safety set up and meeting ATX voltage fluctuations which are more important than a marketing badge on a box.
Posted on Reply