Friday, October 15th 2021

Gigabyte Launches AMD Radeon RX 6600 Eagle 8G Graphics Card

Gigabyte Technology Co. Ltd, a leading manufacturer of premium gaming hardware, today announced a new AMD Radeon RX 6600 graphics card - the Gigabyte Radeon RX 6600 Eagle 8G. The Eagle graphics card is the best choice for those who desire a unique design optimized for power efficiency and durability, and the ability to experience incredible high-framerate 1080p gaming.

AMD Radeon RX 6600 graphics cards are based on the breakthrough AMD RDNA 2 gaming architecture, designed to deliver the optimal balance of performance and power efficiency. Offering 32 MB of high-performance AMD Infinity Cache, 8 GB of GDDR6 memory, AMD Smart Access Memory technology and other advanced features, the new graphics cards are designed to bring next-generation desktop gaming experiences to the midrange market. They also support AMD FidelityFX Super Resolution, an open-source spatial upscaling solution designed to increase framerates in select titles while delivering high-resolution gaming experiences.
The Gigabyte Windforce 3X cooling system features three unique blade fans, alternate spinning, composite copper heat pipes in direct contact with the GPU, 3D active fans, screen cooling and graphene nano lubricant that work together to provide efficient heat dissipation. These cooling technologies keep temperatures low at all times, resulting in higher and more stable performance. The middle fan spins in reverse to optimize airflow for heat dissipation, enabling more efficient performance at a lower temperature. Screen cooling extends the heatsink to allow air to pass through, providing better heat dissipation and preventing heat accumulation so to improve stability. In addition, graphene nano lubricant can extend the fan life by 2.1 times, delivering nearly the lifespan of the double ball bearing while providing quiet operation.

The design of Eagle graphics card is inspired by science-fiction with mechanical materials, providing a transparent cover and bright logo. In addition, the back plate not only strengthens the overall structure of the graphics card, but also prevents the PCB from bending or sustaining damage. GIGABYTE graphics cards use a multi-phase power supply, providing over-temperature protection and load balancing for each MOSFET and allowing the MOSFET to operate at a lower temperature. The Ultra Durable-certified chokes and capacitors provide excellent performance and longer system life.
Source: Gigabyte
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53 Comments on Gigabyte Launches AMD Radeon RX 6600 Eagle 8G Graphics Card

#1
Valantar
Why would you need a triple-fan cooler on a 130W GPU?
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#2
TheLostSwede
ValantarWhy would you need a triple-fan cooler on a 130W GPU?
Because moar fans sell?
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#3
ixi
TheLostSwedeBecause moar fans sell?
Because more silent and better cooling?
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#4
Valantar
ixiBecause more silent and better cooling?
At power draws this low, a good 2-fan cooler will be equally "good" as any 3-fan cooler, and no louder. You'd need a quite incompetently designed (or extremely cost-down) 2-fan cooler for it to not handle 130W silently.
TheLostSwedeBecause moar fans sell?
Sadly you're probably right.
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#5
asdkj1740
ixiBecause more silent and better cooling?
check out kitguru review about eagle & dual
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#6
napata
ValantarWhy would you need a triple-fan cooler on a 130W GPU?
It's quite weird because the Eagle model is generally the lowest end option for Gigabyte. Like the 3060Ti Eagle, which has a 200W TDP, has 2 fans.
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#7
DeathtoGnomes
asdkj1740check out kitguru review about eagle & dual
Links?
Posted on Reply
#8
lexluthermiester
TheLostSwedeBecause moar fans sell?
They also keep 130w cooler too!
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#10
Dristun
ValantarAt power draws this low, a good 2-fan cooler will be equally "good" as any 3-fan cooler, and no louder. You'd need a quite incompetently designed (or extremely cost-down) 2-fan cooler for it to not handle 130W silently.

Sadly you're probably right.
Silent? I think you meant quiet. Silent is when you hear your hard drive scratching, haha. I have a two-fan Palit 1660 (120W TDP) and it was LOUD before I took the shroud off along with stock fans and just slapped my own 120mm fans on it. Sure, it was quieter than blower cards we've had 10 years ago but no way it's quiet. Other low-end cards are also not quiet at all, unless of course you're coming from a reference 5700XT :laugh:
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#11
eidairaman1
The Exiled Airman
napataIt's quite weird because the Eagle model is generally the lowest end option for Gigabyte. Like the 3060Ti Eagle, which has a 200W TDP, has 2 fans.
Eagle sounds better than AORUS lol
Posted on Reply
#12
Valantar
DristunSilent? I think you meant quiet. Silent is when you hear your hard drive scratching, haha. I have a two-fan Palit 1660 (120W TDP) and it was LOUD before I took the shroud off along with stock fans and just slapped my own 120mm fans on it. Sure, it was quieter than blower cards we've had 10 years ago but no way it's quiet. Other low-end cards are also not quiet at all, unless of course you're coming from a reference 5700XT :laugh:
That sounds like one of those incompetent designs then :P Though more likely they just used really cheap and bad fans. You're right about silent v. quiet though - quiet would have been more accurate. But speaking of which, my single-fan, 150W-ish Sapphire RX 570 ITX is reasonably quiet. So it's definitely doable at higher wattages and with fewer fans.
lexluthermiesterThey also keep 130w cooler too!
Sure, but meaningfully cooler? If, at the same rpm, you have 65°C on one and 60°C on the other, does that matter? Even with current aggressive boost algorithms I would expect it not to.
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#13
neatfeatguy
eidairaman1Eagle sounds better than AORUS lol
I think Futurama broke me because I can only think about this clip when I read "eagles":


I play games with headphones on, so a slightly louder GPU over one that's a little quieter probably wouldn't bother me. Coil whine, on the other hand....those high pitch noises pierce through my eardrums, even with headphones on. Thankfully none of my recent GPUs have had that issue.
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#14
Turmania
ixiBecause more silent and better cooling?
Gigabyte GPU that is good at cooling and same time silent as well, that would be a step up from that company.
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#15
ixi
TurmaniaGigabyte GPU that is good at cooling and same time silent as well, that would be a step up from that company.
Had gtx 760 and 980ti from gigafail. Never going to use their gpu's again. Unless they gonna shock the entire world with something incredible. In my mind. Crap company and I'm surprised that they have gotten so far.
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#16
trsttte
I'm all for moar cooling more better, but 3 fans makes the card a bit longer than it needs to be, 2 larger fans would be better at being quiet but whatever. The fact they included a large opening in the back since Nvidia "invented it" this generation is cool (pun intended) but it's sad that all the AIBs seem unable to create a good looking design like Nvidia did.

For me the differentiating point on this card is having 2 hdmi and 2 display port ports instead of the usual 3/1 split, I wish more manufacturers did that
Posted on Reply
#17
HenrySomeone
ixiBecause more silent and better cooling?
Yes, but even in that case, it has been proven several times that 2 larger fans (think MSI Gaming series) do a much better and quieter job than 3 smaller buzzy ones
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#18
lexluthermiester
ValantarSure, but meaningfully cooler?
Cooler is cooler. And with the apparent OC headroom those chips have, the more the better.
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#19
Valantar
lexluthermiesterCooler is cooler. And with the apparent OC headroom those chips have, the more the better.
Didn't W1zzard max out the OC slider on the two-fan model initially tested? And yes, cooler is cooler, but unless that temperature makes a meaningful difference in some way it is, well, meaningless. Running cooler for the sake of running cooler when you're already way outside of any throttling or overheating territory makes no difference whatsoever.
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#20
lexluthermiester
ValantarAnd yes, cooler is cooler, but unless that temperature makes a meaningful difference in some way it is, well, meaningless.
If a user can maintain 55C under full load stock and 60-65C under OC, that is not meaningless, it is in fact excellent!
Posted on Reply
#21
Valantar
lexluthermiesterIf a user can maintain 55C under full load stock and 60-65C under OC, that is not meaningless, it is in fact excellent!
... but is it meaningfully better than maintaining 60°C at stock and 65-70°C under an OC? No. It's effectively the same. We're talking about where you reach the cut-off for getting a reasonable return on your increased cooler size/cost here, and for a 130W (150W OC) cooler, there is essentially no scenario where a decently designed two-fan cooler will not be completely sufficient (until you reach OC levels where thermal density starts being your main issue, in which case you need exotic cooling anyhow). There simply isn't enough thermal energy to dissipate for a three-fan cooler to make sense at these power levels. Approaching 200W? Sure. But 130-150? No. As I mentioned above, my single-fan Sapphire RX 570 ITX is reasonably quiet - though I have considered swapping in a 92mm Noctua fan to see how that improves things. Handling the same heat output with two fans, quietly? Perfectly doable.

The Sapphire RX 6600 XT Pulse vs. the ASRock 6600 XT Phantom Gaming D illustrates this nicely at a noticeably higher power draw: Sure, the Pulse runs 9°C hotter (and unfortunately has poor hotspot temperatures, but that's a cold plate or contact issue, not a heatsink size/dissipation issue), but it's also 2dBA quieter than the three-fan ASRock. The ASRock also boosts ~90MHz higher due to its ~15W higher power budget - but that's hardly a meaningful difference. Is the ASRock cooler overall better? You could say so - it keeps a 15W higher power draw 9 degrees cooler under load, while only being marginally louder. But the thing is: this results in a 2.4fps increaseover TPU's test suite. That's not noticeable for anyone. Does the ASRock have more overclocking headroom? Sure. It clocks 25MHz higher than the Sapphire and clearly maintains that clock speed better due to its higher performance. But the difference is still at most ~5%. And it's worth noting that TPU doesn't measure noise levels in their OC testing, so we don't know whether that up-to 5% increase comes at the cost of a lot more noise (it likely does).

Of course you also have bad two-fan coolers like the Asus that's listed in the same comparsion linked above - it's comparable to the ASRock in temperatures, but at more than 41dBA, and it's still loud in quiet mode at >34dBA. But the Sapphire clearly shows that a two-fan cooler can effectively cool far more power than an RX 6600 can output while staying very quiet.

Modern GPUs just don't OC well. That's been reality for at least three generations now. Boost algorithms extract most of that headroom already. So as long as a cooler is able to maintain performance at reasonable noise levels, it is sufficient, and anything beyond that moves into overkill territory. That's just reality. You can still prefer overkill - and that's perfectly fine - but that doesn't make it useful or meaningful outside of your preference.
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#22
lexluthermiester
Valantar... but is it meaningfully better than maintaining 60°C at stock and 65-70°C under an OC? No. It's effectively the same.
That's your opinion, not everyone agrees.

Listen, I'm not debating this matter with you. It's not worthy of such a lengthy effort. Either you get it and see the value of such "overkill" engineering or you don't. If you don't, that's cool, buy something else. For those people who see the value of such engineering, this is for them. It's that simple.
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#23
Valantar
lexluthermiesterThat's your opinion, not everyone agrees.

Listen, I'm not debating this matter with you. It's not worthy of such a lengthy effort. Either you get it and see the value of such "overkill" engineering or you don't. If you don't, that's cool, buy something else. For those people who see the value of such engineering, this is for them. It's that simple.
The "value" lies mainly in GPU makers adding $30-60 to the MSRP for a "premium" SKU that delivers no tangible benefits to users. So ... yeah. If you see "value" in that, that's on you.
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#24
Calmmo
lexluthermiesterThat's your opinion, not everyone agrees.

Listen, I'm not debating this matter with you. It's not worthy of such a lengthy effort. Either you get it and see the value of such "overkill" engineering or you don't. If you don't, that's cool, buy something else. For those people who see the value of such engineering, this is for them. It's that simple.
well some, like me, get OCD about temps, i get anxious whenever my GPU goes above 65c for example and start tweaking system fan curves (aka me every time it starts getting hotter around summer)
Posted on Reply
#25
DeathtoGnomes
Calmmowell some, like me, get OCD about temps, i get anxious whenever my GPU goes above 65c for example and start tweaking system fan curves (aka me every time it starts getting hotter around summer)
fan curves are there to be tweaked. I do like the engineering on this card, you dont see too many 'over engineered' cards.
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