Thursday, October 21st 2021

Seagate Expands Xbox Series X|S Storage Capacity for the Holiday Season

More than ever, today's Xbox fans needs more storage space to keep their console games easily accessible without sacrificing performance. Today, Seagate Technology plc, officially added 512 GB and 2 TB capacity options to its Storage Expansion Card for Xbox Series X|S line up. Just in time for the holidays, players can now choose from 512 GB, 1 TB, and 2 TB external storage capacities for a streamlined gaming experience replicating the speed and performance of their Xbox Series X|S console's internal storage.

With a sleek design exclusively designed for Xbox, the Seagate Storage Expansion Card for Xbox Series X|S is the only external storage device that enables users to leverage the full performance of the Xbox Velocity Architecture when playing games that have been optimized for the next generation of Xbox consoles. With the added capacities, more Xbox fans can collect and play new and legacy games directly from the storage card without sacrificing graphics, speed, load times, or frame rates. The Seagate Storage Expansion Card for Xbox Series X|S is backwards compatible with games from all four generations of Xbox, including Xbox One, Xbox 360, and original Xbox. It includes a three-year limited warranty, so players have peace of mind knowing their games and data are safe.
The perfect holiday gift for Xbox fans, the new Seagate Storage Expansion card for Xbox Series X|S 512 GB capacity is available for preorder now for $139.99, and the 2 TB capacity will be available for preorder next month for $399.99. The 1 TB capacity is available now for $219.99.
Source: Seagate
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10 Comments on Seagate Expands Xbox Series X|S Storage Capacity for the Holiday Season

#1
Valantar
Given that these are 2-lane PCIe 4.0 NVMe SSDs behind a bog-standard CFexpress interface I really hope to see someone else putting out a competitor to these soon. Those prices are ... well, not as bad as console storage back in the day, but still terrible.
Posted on Reply
#2
seth1911
Expensive Memorycards are back, now days 139$ for 512GB 4.0 x2 FCK :toast: (while a NVME 3.0 x4 is by 80$)
Posted on Reply
#3
Valantar
If I had an XSX, I would likely just get one of these+ the cheapest 4.0 SSD I could find, hoping it would work. The SSD would likely be returnable, at least. It's the same adapter as that "modder" tested with an XSX SSDa while back, which also didn't work with some random 3.0 SSD, but worked fine with the custom(ish) SN530 MS uses in the consoles. If it works with off-the-shelf 4.0 drives that would still be a decent amount cheaper for anything 1TB and above, though it would be roughly a match for 500GB drives (at least here in Sweden).
Posted on Reply
#4
timta2
Those prices are so typically and historically Microsoft painful.
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#5
billEST
ValantarIf I had an XSX, I would likely just get one of these+ the cheapest 4.0 SSD I could find, hoping it would work. The SSD would likely be returnable, at least. It's the same adapter as that "modder" tested with an XSX SSDa while back, which also didn't work with some random 3.0 SSD, but worked fine with the custom(ish) SN530 MS uses in the consoles. If it works with off-the-shelf 4.0 drives that would still be a decent amount cheaper for anything 1TB and above, though it would be roughly a match for 500GB drives (at least here in Sweden).
and it will be dead in 1 year

in the xbox its entreprise class sdd x2 price
Posted on Reply
#6
Valantar
billESTand it will be dead in 1 year

in the xbox its entreprise class sdd x2 price
What? The Xbox uses a semi-custom version of the WD SN530. AFAIK the SN530 has a dual-mode PCIe 3.0x4/4.0x2 controller, with consumer models running at 3.0x4 and the Xbox using 4.0x2 (though it might be two different controllers - I kind of doubt that though). There is nothing enterprise-class about it, nor is there any reason why a consumer SSD would die in a year if used in a console - gaming is very light on storage, with the amount of writes (which is what wears out SSDs the fastest being tiny.
Posted on Reply
#7
seth1911
timta2Those prices are so typically and historically Microsoft painful.
A 512GB with 140$ cost nearly the half of the Series S with only 512GB :laugh:

On the other hand u will need a expansion SSD on the S if u player more Games cause u havent a BD Drive;)
Posted on Reply
#8
trsttte
Bog-standard m.2 nvme on the ps5 lookin real good about now ain't it? :D
Posted on Reply
#9
billEST
ValantarWhat? The Xbox uses a semi-custom version of the WD SN530. AFAIK the SN530 has a dual-mode PCIe 3.0x4/4.0x2 controller, with consumer models running at 3.0x4 and the Xbox using 4.0x2 (though it might be two different controllers - I kind of doubt that though). There is nothing enterprise-class about it, nor is there any reason why a consumer SSD would die in a year if used in a console - gaming is very light on storage, with the amount of writes (which is what wears out SSDs the fastest being tiny.
www.westerndigital.com/products/internal-drives/ix-sn530-nvme-ssd#SDBPNPZ-256G-XI

IX SN530 introduces high performance and endurance to support break through innovation development in industrial and autonomous driving applications.

The IX SN530 features a PCIe Gen3x4 NVMe™1 interface with industrial grade NAND to provide extended operating temperature ranges and endurance. Designed to provide versatility and value across multiple capacities, M.2 2230 and 2280 form factors and the choice of SLC or TLC configurations to bring the latest in robust and long-life design to the industrial space.
Posted on Reply
#10
Valantar
billESTwww.westerndigital.com/products/internal-drives/ix-sn530-nvme-ssd#SDBPNPZ-256G-XI

IX SN530 introduces high performance and endurance to support break through innovation development in industrial and autonomous driving applications.

The IX SN530 features a PCIe Gen3x4 NVMe™1 interface with industrial grade NAND to provide extended operating temperature ranges and endurance. Designed to provide versatility and value across multiple capacities, M.2 2230 and 2280 form factors and the choice of SLC or TLC configurations to bring the latest in robust and long-life design to the industrial space.
That's not the drive found in the new Xboxes -they are marked CH SN530, not IX. There's no reason to expect MS to have splurged on extended operating temperature NAND for their Xboxes - there's no way they get that hot, especially seeing how the SSD is either quite far from or mounted on an entirely different PCB than any significant heat-generating components. That series is for industrial or automotive use, not for game consoles. There's no reason to suspect that its hardware is materially different from the PC SN530, beyond whatever is needed for it to operate at PCIe 4.0x2 rather than 3.0x4.
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Jul 7th, 2022 00:40 EDT change timezone

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