Tuesday, December 14th 2021

Intel Core i3-12100F & i5-12400F Surface Without Efficiency Cores

The first 65 W Alder Lake desktop processors have recently surfaced including the i3-12100F, i5-12400F, and i7-12700F which are expected to launch in January. The i3-12100F and i5-12400F are expected to be the first Alder Lake-S processors without any Gracemont high-efficiency cores instead of relying solely on Golden Cove high-performance cores. The i3-12100F will feature 4 cores and 8 threads with a max boost speed of 4.3 GHz while the i5-12400F will include 6 cores and 12 threads running at a max clock speed of 4.4 GHz.

The i7-12700F will feature the same core configuration as the i7-12700KF just with lower clock speeds and a reduced TDP of 65 W compared to 125 W. The packaging for these three processors along with marketing materials have been leaked revealing that the retail versions will include the Laminar RM1 stock cooler. These new Alder Lake CPUs along with various other models are expected to launch sometime in January after CES 2022.
Source: VideoCardz
Add your own comment

27 Comments on Intel Core i3-12100F & i5-12400F Surface Without Efficiency Cores

#1
Nephilim666
Can anyone explain the cooler to me? Looks like the fins are made of plastic?
Posted on Reply
#2
KarymidoN
Nephilim666Can anyone explain the cooler to me? Looks like the fins are made of plastic?
it probably has a plastic structure that looks like the fins, but just the center is made of aluminum.
probab worst than the old intel stock cooler b/c it has less metal on it.
Posted on Reply
#4
InVasMani
I'd like to see how small this heat sink is w/o the fan compared to the older Core 2 Quad ones. Intel keeps making them smaller and smaller. I guess it's likely just barely sufficient since they are jailed up locked up CPU's anyway.
Posted on Reply
#5
Why_Me
Get a job and purchase a $20 aftermarket heatsink.
Posted on Reply
#6
Kohl Baas
Nephilim666Can anyone explain the cooler to me? Looks like the fins are made of plastic?
Because it's painted. It has a shiny black powder-coating finish. But it's metal alright.

It looks awesome for a stock cooler. I wonder if the blue lining glows. Probably not though...
Posted on Reply
#7
Mussels
Freshwater Moderator
Nephilim666Can anyone explain the cooler to me? Looks like the fins are made of plastic?
They are. The actual heatsink is the tiny little thing right at the very bottom, that's an "air guide" made to pretend the heatsink is bigger and meaner than the same cheapo generic intel cooler we've had for the last decade
Kohl BaasBecause it's painted. It has a shiny black powder-coating finish. But it's metal alright.

It looks awesome for a stock cooler. I wonder if the blue lining glows. Probably not though...
It's transparent in places, it's a plastic frame on top of a boring intel cooler. You can see the actual alu fins at the very bottom.
Posted on Reply
#8
Crackong
Nephilim666Can anyone explain the cooler to me? Looks like the fins are made of plastic?
Top fins are plastic, aesthetic only
Posted on Reply
#9
Vayra86
Why_MeGet a job and purchase a $20 aftermarket heatsink.
So if you're out of work you'd still buy the Intel CPU but be stuck with a stock cooler. I know the wages can be shit, but thát bad?! :D

But yeah... less metal, more plastic and a ring LED. I guess Intel knows how to modernize its portfolio now, and the LED being blue, surely must provide a good temperature reduction.
Posted on Reply
#10
InVasMani
I'd rather them just not include the heatsink and drop $20's off the price! ;)
Vayra86But yeah... less metal, more plastic and a ring LED.
That's how you know it's cooling provided it's blue. Less metal more blue lighting. Besides the less metal they use the more your FAN RPM GO VRRRRROOOOOM!! FASTER = BETTER!
Posted on Reply
#11
Caring1
CrackongTop fins are plastic, aesthetic only
Or they direct air flow to the VRMs.
Posted on Reply
#12
InVasMani
Good catch on the VRM's. I mean surely some of it's aesthetics, but I was actually pondering what was the reason the somewhat odd pattern which the VRM's could be a solid reason.
Posted on Reply
#13
qubit
Overclocked quantum bit
I'd be interested in a CPU with only the 8 performance cores, but something tells me that Intel won't release that...
Posted on Reply
#14
Mussels
Freshwater Moderator
qubitI'd be interested in a CPU with only the 8 performance cores, but something tells me that Intel won't release that...
Nah cause the reviewers would say "For gaming builds, dont bother with E-cores!" and then the mass-market would follow


I swear the e-cores only exist to add some crunch to cinebench
Posted on Reply
#15
seth1911
:laugh: small cooler with plastic fins on top :laugh:
On Meteor Lake u get a cooler in the size for old Chipsets?

Maybe the Company im work, should spend some Alu for Intel :roll:
Posted on Reply
#16
qubit
Overclocked quantum bit
MusselsNah cause the reviewers would say "For gaming builds, dont bother with E-cores!" and then the mass-market would follow


I swear the e-cores only exist to add some crunch to cinebench
Yeah, maybe.

The way I see the P+E design isn't as an 8+8 core CPU, but as a 16 core CPU with half of the cores having nobbled performance. That's pretty annoying for me, so I'd just rather pay less money for an 8 core performance only model. Or heck, I may just go AMD this time as the Intel gaming performance advantage really isn't all that much. We'll see,
Posted on Reply
#17
Mussels
Freshwater Moderator
qubitYeah, maybe.

The way I see the P+E design isn't as an 8+8 core CPU, but as a 16 core CPU with half of the cores having nobbled performance. That's pretty annoying for me, so I'd just rather pay less money for an 8 core performance only model. Or heck, I may just go AMD this time as the Intel gaming performance advantage really isn't all that much. We'll see,
Intel want to win at single threaded benchmarks, with at least 4 cores (since that wins game benchmarks) - theres P cores

Then they want to win where AMD is strong, multi threaded... but they lack power efficiency. How can they do a Zen 1 with lots of cores, without losing the ST performance?
Oh thats right, add both. Chips that say screw the power consumption and go max performance, and chips that add MT performance at more efficient settings, whilst also spreading the heat load out making it easier to cool
Posted on Reply
#18
Crackong
Caring1Or they direct air flow to the VRMs.
The air will flow to the VRM after passing the main heatsink fins.
There is no point to direct the air out before the main heatsink....
qubitI'd be interested in a CPU with only the 8 performance cores, but something tells me that Intel won't release that...
I bet a pure 8 P core CPU with the same 241W TDP will crush the 12900k in gaming no doubt
Posted on Reply
#19
Caring1
CrackongThe air will flow to the VRM after passing the main heatsink fins.
There is no point to direct the air out before the main heatsink....
Actually there is a point to it.
Less heat directed at the VRMs.
The fan pulls convected heat away from the heatsink, so doesn't all have to be directed down.
Posted on Reply
#20
Crackong
Caring1Actually there is a point to it.
Less heat directed at the VRMs.
The fan pulls convected heat away from the heatsink, so doesn't all have to be directed down.
Ah
But also less airflow directed to the CPU heatsink.......
I don't think it is worth trading CPU temps for VRM temps........
Posted on Reply
#21
intrvlvr
KarymidoNprobab worst than the old intel stock cooler b/c it has less metal on it.
Not sure as it brings at least 100 grams more to its weight. It also has to cool down cpus with 58-89W TDP
seth1911:laugh: small cooler with plastic fins on top :laugh:
On Meteor Lake u get a cooler in the size for old Chipsets?

Maybe the Company im work, should spend some Alu for Intel :roll:
You guys are hilarious. You are talking about the fins of the cooler not of the heatsink, which are still of metal. Intel hasn't changed this modus operandi and knows for sure better than you what to do with their chips and their coolers
CrackongThe air will flow to the VRM after passing the main heatsink fins.
There is no point to direct the air out before the main heatsink....
but then it will be just warm air that hits the VRMs
Posted on Reply
#22
Mussels
Freshwater Moderator
intrvlvrNot sure as it brings at least 100 grams more to its weight. It also has to cool down cpus with 58-89W TDP


You guys are hilarious. You are talking about the fins of the cooler not of the heatsink, which are still of metal. Intel hasn't changed this modus operandi and knows for sure better than you what to do with their chips and their coolers


but then it will be just warm air that hits the VRMs
Intels CPU's get higher wattage every year, and somehow their coolers get worse
Posted on Reply
#23
Crackong
intrvlvrbut then it will be just warm air that hits the VRMs
The heat won't disappear and has to go somewhere.
Chocking the CPU cooler will make the cooler exhaust air hot (not warm) then hits your VRMs, so it balanced out your "fresh air".
And the CPU temps sky high.

So Yes, it is better to be that way, moving all air through the main heat sink and let warm air do the VRM cooling.
Posted on Reply
#24
Vayra86
MusselsIntels CPU's get higher wattage every year, and somehow their coolers get worse
No! Intel CPUs are really still more efficient while gaming, wtf are you talking about. Only when you click Minesweeper tiles open its even more efficient than Ryzen in gaming! And it has an igp to run it too!
CrackongThe heat won't disappear and has to go somewhere.
Chocking the CPU cooler will make the cooler exhaust air hot (not warm) then hits your VRMs, so it balanced out your "fresh air".
And the CPU temps sky high.

So Yes, it is better to be that way, moving all air through the main heat sink and let warm air do the VRM cooling.
Not really. It depends on case air volume and flow. More volume can reach equilibrium with less airflow, quite simply because the hot air loses temp more easily to ambient surroundings.

In a smaller cases you need more airflow to refresh air faster so the same thing can happen. Placing fans directly on a vrm only helps in a small case and only IF you can exhaust that air quickly.
Posted on Reply
#25
Mussels
Freshwater Moderator
Vayra86No! Intel CPUs are really still more efficient while gaming, wtf are you talking about. Only when you click Minesweeper tiles open its even more efficient than Ryzen in gaming! And it has an igp to run it too!
:/
They have made some improvements, but on average they're quite behind ryzen
Apart from the 10400f (which genuinely is a decent all rounder CPU), it seems you've been reading the charts backwards "lower is better"

and ofc, the end of the review (12700k) - i dont feel the need to highlight the specific line
Posted on Reply
Add your own comment
May 16th, 2022 19:19 EDT change timezone

New Forum Posts

Popular Reviews

Controversial News Posts