Thursday, January 13th 2022

Comcast Announces World-First Test of 10G Modem Technology Capable of Delivering Multigigabit Speeds to Homes

Comcast today announced the successful test of a prototype 10G modem using the core technology that will deliver multigigabit speeds to tens of millions of homes. In a world-first lab test, a Full Duplex DOCSIS 4.0 system-on-chip (SoC) cable modem built by Broadcom delivered upload and download speeds faster than 4 gigabits per second (Gbps) powered by 10G network technology. Today's announcement is the latest in a series of 10G milestones from Comcast. In October 2021, the company announced a successful test of a complete 10G connection using a virtualized cable modem termination system (vCMTS) powered by DOCSIS 4.0 technology. That announcement followed major 10G milestone announcements in April 2021, of the first-ever live lab test of a 10G system-on-chip (SOC) and October 2020, of a trial delivering 1.25 gigabit-per-second (Gbps) upload and download speeds over a live production network using Network Function Virtualization (NFV) combined with the latest DOCSIS technology

A key component of 10G, DOCSIS 4.0 is an evolutionary leap forward in the ability to deliver multigigabit upload and download speeds over the connections already installed in hundreds of millions of homes worldwide. "The great strength of our smart network design is that we are able to exceed our customers' demands today, even as we continuously evolve to meet the needs of the future," said Charlie Herrin, President of Technology, Product, Experience at Comcast Cable. "As our 10G journey continues to accelerate, customers will reap the benefits of ever-increasing security, reliability, and speed."
10G technology builds on the work Comcast has done over the past several years to build a smarter, more virtualized network. In addition to providing a path to multigigabit upload and download speeds at scale, 10G updates will deliver near-term benefits to customers in the form of increased reliability, performance, and lower latency.

Connected by Broadcom 10G technology, the modem test utilized the DOCSIS 4.0 FDX SoC device, which Comcast demonstrated in April 2021, to pair with two cable modem chips to deliver the breakthrough performance. These were successfully connected over a lab-based hybrid fiber-coaxial network to the vCMTS operating in DOCSIS 4.0 mode. This represents the first complete network connection of all-DOCSIS 4.0 components that are required for deployment. The demonstrated speeds - which were faster than 4 Gbps upload and download - are expected to increase significantly as developers refine technology at every level of the 10G architecture.

"With each new milestone, we get a clearer picture of how 10G technologies will unlock the next generation of speed and performance for millions of people worldwide," said Elad Nafshi, Senior Vice President of Next Generation Access Networks at Comcast Cable.

10G is a global industry initiative to stay ahead of consumer demand by developing and deploying new network technology to dramatically increase upload and download capacity in the coming years.
Source: Comcast
Add your own comment

96 Comments on Comcast Announces World-First Test of 10G Modem Technology Capable of Delivering Multigigabit Speeds to Homes

#1
Lycanwolfen
Lol From what I hear about comcast service it would never get those speeds.
Posted on Reply
#2
bonehead123
TheLostSwededelivered upload and download speeds faster than 4 gigabits per second (Gbps) powered by 10G network technology.
So...... pay thru the nose for 10G, get 4Gbps..... yep that'll work, oh yea uh huh 4 sure 4 sure :(
Posted on Reply
#3
Lew Zealand
10Gbps only at 4am when nobody else is using all the shared cable bandwidth. During the day you're back to 8Mbps with 120 ping.
Posted on Reply
#4
TheinsanegamerN
Which will be availablle to 2 blocks in seattle, assuming you are 3/4ths bald eagle, know the masons handshake, and can recite every state capital backwards.

the rest of us will be stuck with 100 Mbps service that costs way too much money, while getting fliers every 3 months for this service we cannot buy.
Posted on Reply
#5
yapchagi
and all of that with 1 TB data cap or pay $50 monthly for unlimited data.
Posted on Reply
#6
zlobby
Yawn, 2020 called. They want their FTTx speeds back.
Seriously, who would invest in DOCSIS in 2022?
Posted on Reply
#7
AsRock
TPU addict
Lew Zealand10Gbps only at 4am when nobody else is using all the shared cable bandwidth. During the day you're back to 8Mbps with 120 ping.
Personally i have had no problem with Comcasts network over 12 years now. How much they charge for what you get and other BS well that's another story.
Posted on Reply
#8
neatfeatguy
Yeah! Alright, Comcast! /s

You can bring faster speeds, but you can't remove the shitty 1TB data cap?
Posted on Reply
#9
robot zombie
neatfeatguyYeah! Alright, Comcast! /s

You can bring faster speeds, but you can't remove the shitty 1TB data cap?
Agh... I hate home internet data caps. At one point in time, I understood it... for mobile. But I have no gratitude towards the mobile industry for showing the utilities another new way to convince people to pay more for the same service.

These companies exist in a heavily barred-up market that harbors no space for competition. Exploitative practices are a given. The truth is likely that they couldve lifted the cap at any time. As far as I know, infrastructure in most places is not under threat of overload.

If it is, you expand it, and everyone using it pays a bit extra for that. Charging a fee for some people to bypass the limit sucks in the same way fastpass at Disney sucks. There is throttling. Everybody waits a little longer. Don't internet infrastructures also tend to have load-balancing contingencies for surges, too?

If the infrastructure was that bad, then the solution would be to improve it, so everyone has a fair chance at using it, not divvy it out by whoever has the money to throw at what's left of the existing infrastructure. That's depraved for a supposed rich country lol

Like... imagine the friggin electric company full on capping your power usage like that because there are brownouts. So now, to have steady power, you need more disposable income, and its implicit that some wont be able to pay. If they could, and they all got on the system, it would fail. The continued operation is dependent on exclusion. Or put bluntly, that system isn't adequate for the needs of the population its supposed to serve. And the solution of upcharging for uncapping is to me deeply unethical. But I suppose it really comes down to how nessesary you believe data caps to be.
Posted on Reply
#11
neatfeatguy
robot zombieAgh... I hate home internet data caps. At one point in time, I understood it... for mobile. But I have no gratitude towards the mobile industry for showing the utilities another new way to convince people to pay more for the same service.

These companies exist in a heavily barred-up market that harbors no space for competition. Exploitative practices are a given. The truth is likely that they couldve lifted the cap at any time. As far as I know, infrastructure in most places is not under threat of overload.

If it is, you expand it, and everyone using it pays a bit extra for that. Charging a fee for some people to bypass the limit sucks in the same way fastpass at Disney sucks. There is throttling. Everybody waits a little longer. Don't internet infrastructures also tend to have load-balancing contingencies for surges, too?

If the infrastructure was that bad, then the solution would be to improve it, so everyone has a fair chance at using it, not divvy it out by whoever has the money to throw at what's left of the existing infrastructure. That's depraved for a supposed rich country lol

Like... imagine the friggin electric company full on capping your power usage like that because there are brownouts. So now, to have steady power, you need more disposable income, and its implicit that some wont be able to pay. If they could, and they all got on the system, it would fail. The continued operation is dependent on exclusion. Or put bluntly, that system isn't adequate for the needs of the population its supposed to serve. And the solution of upcharging for uncapping is to me deeply unethical. But I suppose it really comes down to how nessesary you believe data caps to be.
Comcast removed the data cap during the lockdown months for everyone at no cost - I think it was left in place for almost the entire year of 2020, actually.

Internet data usage can easily double for the day when folks are locked at home. My family of 4 easily surpassed the 1TB monthly limit by 600GB+ during the lock down phase due to the kids doing remote learning all of last school year. I'm sure most other families were in the same situation. I saw no issues with internet speeds at that time, still pulling in close to 100Mb/s that we've always had and pings for gaming online were still in the low 20s like they always are. Comcast can certainly handle it if they dropped the datacap, they just want to have a way to make more money off people.

This past November and December, the kids had a week off for Thanksgiving and almost 2 weeks of for Christmas break. Each month I had to block the internet on their devices to keep from going over the data cap. Because with other family members being sick or the weather just being too cold to be outside, we spent most of these days inside and didn't go anywhere. I told them if they wanted to watch something, they'd have to settle with what we have on Plex and no streaming of worthless crap on youtube or using Netflix and other streaming services. They could do gaming online, but no downloading of games. It's irritating when you have 12-13 days left in the month and you get a notice from Comcast saying you've used up 75% of your data limit. Then a couple days later the next email from Comcast tells you that you've used up 85% of your data cap.....it's irritating as hell. The same thing happens during the summer when school is out, I've got 3-4 months to closely monitor to make sure we don't exceed the data cap.

Comcast gives you 1 free month to exceed the data cap in a year. If you do it more than once, every 50GB over the cap for a month, they bill you an extra $10. I'm content with the speeds I get from Comcast and only having to pay $50 a month, we don't have issues streaming, gaming or downloading (upload speeds suck ass, though). I just hate the crappy data cap they have in place.

So, I'd much rather seem them raise the limit to 2TB or outright remove it over adding more speed.
Posted on Reply
#12
Recus
5G conspiracy nuts when they know about 10G.

Posted on Reply
#13
mashie
Recus5G conspiracy nuts when they know about 10G.
That doesn't compute, 5G is "5th Generation" while 10G is 10Gigabit.
Posted on Reply
#14
AnarchoPrimitiv
LycanwolfenLol From what I hear about comcast service it would never get those speeds.
I get 1.2Gbps (1200Mbps) from Comcast for $70/month, test my speed every week and never get anything less (985Mbps on a 1 gig connectionand 1185Mbps on a 10Gbase-T connection). I'm not in support of any telecom,but that's my experience. BTW, I live in a relatively small town in New Hampshire and get full speeds even at 6pm on a weekday night, ping is around 9ms...and I don't have a data cap
zlobbyYawn, 2020 called. They want their FTTx speeds back.
Seriously, who would invest in DOCSIS in 2022?
Any company not trying to literally spend billions on installing fiber on the utility poles and in the ground
Posted on Reply
#15
ir_cow
Here I am with comcast that can't even deliver the promised 1200 Mbps...

Might as well downgrade at this point. Just given them money for "up to" bs.
Posted on Reply
#16
lynx29
LycanwolfenLol From what I hear about comcast service it would never get those speeds.
even if it did get those speeds they would put i a hefty data cap tier model in place, bleeding users of money ;)
AnarchoPrimitivI get 1.2Gbps (1200Mbps) from Comcast for $70/month, test my speed every week and never get anything less (985Mbps on a 1 gig connectionand 1185Mbps on a 10Gbase-T connection). I'm not in support of any telecom,but that's my experience. BTW, I live in a relatively small town in New Hampshire and get full speeds even at 6pm on a weekday night, ping is around 9ms...and I don't have a data cap


Any company not trying to literally spend billions on installing fiber on the utility poles and in the ground
you only don't have a data cap because a moratorium was placed on it for a few years. in about 5 years when they are even more of a monopoly, and you have no other options, they will reintroduce data caps even for those who rent their modem, wait and see.
Posted on Reply
#17
Caring1
mashieThat doesn't compute, 5G is "5th Generation" while 10G is 10Gigabit.
You missed the funny.
Conspiracy nuts don't care about facts.
Posted on Reply
#18
CrAsHnBuRnXp
AnarchoPrimitivI get 1.2Gbps (1200Mbps) from Comcast for $70/month, test my speed every week and never get anything less (985Mbps on a 1 gig connectionand 1185Mbps on a 10Gbase-T connection). I'm not in support of any telecom,but that's my experience. BTW, I live in a relatively small town in New Hampshire and get full speeds even at 6pm on a weekday night, ping is around 9ms...and I don't have a data cap


Any company not trying to literally spend billions on installing fiber on the utility poles and in the ground
Ill post mine when I get home if I remember. I have 1200 plan with comcast as well and i get roughly those speeds as well. I typically dont have any issues with Comcast.
Posted on Reply
#19
lexluthermiester
TheLostSwedeComcast today announced the successful test of a prototype 10G modem using the core technology that will deliver multigigabit speeds to tens of millions of homes.
Too bad it's Comcast with their silly bandwidth limits and horrendous overage charges. I would rather not have internet service than ever deal with Comcast again..
Posted on Reply
#20
Durvelle27
LycanwolfenLol From what I hear about comcast service it would never get those speeds.
I get my speeds jut fine. I pay for 1200Mbps and pull 1000-1100 daily

Also Comcast doesn't have a DATA cap when using xFI
Posted on Reply
#21
R-T-B
AsRockPersonally i have had no problem with Comcasts network over 12 years now. How much they charge for what you get and other BS well that's another story.
Agreed. I get my speeds. Don't ask what they cost though, it makes me grumpy.
Posted on Reply
#22
enzolt
R-T-BAgreed. I get my speeds. Don't ask what they cost though, it makes me grumpy.
Posted on Reply
#23
swaaye
This massive bandwidth is such an interesting thing to me. They must be overselling on the infrastructure like nuts to do this, counting on the fact that few of their subscribers would fully utilize even a 50 mbps link and of course have no idea whatsoever about what they actually use do to their internetting funs.

Around here we have TDS trying to make an entry with "2G", and the AT&T and Spectrum duopoly gradually improving offerings as a result.
Posted on Reply
#24
Toothless
Tech, Games, and TPU!
neatfeatguyYeah! Alright, Comcast! /s

You can bring faster speeds, but you can't remove the shitty 1TB data cap?
I pay for 800 down, I get 790 down.

I also pay for unlimited data. It's an option to add on.
Posted on Reply
#25
Garrus
The entire neighborhood where I live gets random packet loss on cable internet. They can't fix it. I switched to Fibre to the home and it was easily worth the extra $20 per month (now with the same upload as download speeds). It's not really faster per say (latency was reduced by 5ms but not really noticeable) but it is much more reliable technology. I really notice the improvement doing all the work from home remote desktop connections. No more packet loss. Our cable company sold out and merged with the largest in the country (Rogers) and prices are up so much there's no advantage to cable anymore.
Posted on Reply
Add your own comment