Friday, January 23rd 2009

Intel to Call on AMD, to Discuss Possible License Violations

Silicon giant Intel flexed its IPR muscle by reportedly calling rival AMD to discussions on possible violations of past license agreements. AMD and Intel share license agreements dating back to 1976, which eventually transformed into the agreement of letting AMD use Intel's x86 micro-architecture in making its own products. Later in 2001, the two companies met again to share x86-related technologies. Such agreements bind licensees of the x86 architecture to confining their technologies to themselves as the license is non-transferable.

The two companies are expected to meet to discuss on how the past two major events in the recent history of AMD: the acquisition of ATI Technologies, and the spin-off of the manufacturing division to The Foundry Company respect the terms of the agreements. Earlier, AMD stated that the ATI acquisition does not violate any of its cross-agreements with Intel, while the company sounds optimistic about getting The Foundry Company to existence smoothly through one of its big hurdles: a clean-chit from Intel, after having crossed bigger hurdles such as government approvals and support from the various countries it holds its facilities in.Source: TechConnect Magazine
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33 Comments on Intel to Call on AMD, to Discuss Possible License Violations

#1
imperialreign
FordGT90Concept said:
That's the way I understand it (a meeting to discuss the standing of the licenses). Intel's lawyers are going to present what they see as problems and try to settle it out of court. If Intel's lawyers walk away unhappy, I'm certain it will end up in court sooner or later.

I'm sure AMD's lawyers have a few outstanding license issues they'd like to discuss too. The lawsuits aren't happening yet but I think it is inevitable.
hopefully it won't have to come down to litigation . . . considering both Intel and AMD are playing fairly with each other right now, instead of acting like 4 year olds, it's quite possible that things will work out favorably for each.
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#2
FordGT90Concept
"I go fast!1!11!1!"
X-Bit Labs
Advanced Micro Devices and Advanced Technology Investment Company (ATIC) announced on Tuesday that they had obtained clearance from the Committee on Foreign Investment in the United States (CFIUS) regarding the creation of The Foundry Company (TFC), a joint venture between AMD and United Arab Emirates-based ATIC.
ATIC will be learning things Intel did not approve.
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#3
mdm-adph
3870x2 said:
I wasnt wrong, I chose incorrect wording. Those companies are AMD, nothing was actually transferred. Rather, the technology still lies with AMD an no one else. The foundry company is not going to produce for anyone else, so nothing has changed.

Perhaps INTEL knows something that the rest of us don't: AM3 is going to rock the world:rockout::rockout:
I do find Intel's timing a bit suspect. How long has the Foundry Company plan been around? More than a year now?
Posted on Reply
#4
FordGT90Concept
"I go fast!1!11!1!"
If it ends up in court, that may be considered.


I wouldn't expect much from AM3. It is merely a different socket for Phenom II processors to use. It doesn't represent anything monumental.
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#5
Hayder_Master
still this thing not solve yet , sure amd do good cpu's now
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#6
Wile E
Power User
FordGT90Concept said:
Read what you said...

"...they were transferred...."

It doesn't matter who is involved, the license is non-transferable. AMD is going to have to bribe Intel in order not to get sued.
Good thing they never transferred the license then. AMD is still the only holder of it. TFC can't stamp out x86 cpus unless it's from a licensed company. Meaning they can stamp out for AMD, VIA, or even Intel themselves. They just can't stamp out their own x86 chips.

I think AMD is fine here.
Posted on Reply
#7
Millenia
Wile E said:
Good thing they never transferred the license then. AMD is still the only holder of it. TFC can't stamp out x86 cpus unless it's from a licensed company. Meaning they can stamp out for AMD, VIA, or even Intel themselves. They just can't stamp out their own x86 chips.

I think AMD is fine here.
Quoted for truth
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#8
Darkrealms
I can't see Intel actually wanting AMD gone (in any of their reality thoughts, lol). Intel wants to be able to control AMD. AMD has been branching out a lot lately and with some large partners. Intel may also be worried those partners are/will try to take over AMD. Or for that matter Intel may be trying to scare those partners away (not that I think that will happen).

Intel needs AMD around but on that same note Intel needs to be able to control AMD as much as they can to keep their edge. By keeping them around and looking like they are just competiters it keeps the governments off their back (as much as possible).
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