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Call of Duty: Modern Warfare System Requirements Revealed

Ahead of its October 25 release, NVIDIA got hold of the system requirements for "Call of Duty: Modern Warfare," the month's hottest AAA release. NVIDIA is an extensive technical partner for the game's development, and the game is expected to feature NVIDIA RTX real-time ray-tracing at launch, along with support for NVIDIA Highlights and Ansel, although there's no mention of DLSS from NVIDIA. The game supports Windows 7, and isn't restricted to Windows 10. It calls for a whopping 175 GB of disk space. The bare minimum system requirements for a 1080p experience includes 8 GB of RAM, Intel Core i3-4130 or AMD FX-6300 processors, and GeForce GTX 670 or current-gen GTX 1650 graphics.

The recommended system requirements for 1080p 60 FPS without ray-tracing are Core i5-2500K or Ryzen 5 1600X processor, 12 GB of RAM, and either GTX 970 or current-gen GTX 1660 graphics. For 1080p 60 FPS with ray-tracing, the requirements climb up to RTX 2060 graphics. At the same resolution with 144 FPS frame-rate, "High" preset, and "competitive" performance that won't let you down in an online MP situation, you'll need at least a GeForce RTX 2070 Super, 16 GB of system RAM, and either Core i7-8700K or Ryzen 7 1800X processor. For 4K 60 FPS with ray-tracing, a high-end experience, you'll need at least an RTX 2080 Super graphics card, and either Core i7-9700K or Ryzen 7 2700X processor. The NVIDIA article doesn't mention AMD Radeon graphics cards. In the absence of ray-tracing, you can probably use an RX 590 for 1080p 60 FPS, RX 5700 for 1080p 144 FPS or 1440p 60 FPS.

TechPowerUp GPU-Z v2.26.0 Released

Today we released the latest version of TechPowerUp GPU-Z, the popular graphics subsystem information, monitoring, and diagnostic utility. Version 2.26.0 adds support for new GPUs, introduces new features, and fixes problems with existing ones. To begin with, support is added for AMD Radeon RX 5500 and RX 5500M, TU104-based NVIDIA GeForce RTX 2060 (non-Super), and Quadro P520. Fake detection has been added for various "Kepler" based GTX 10-series knockoffs.

With this release we fixed an application crash during BIOS extraction on nearly all NVIDIA GPUs. Another crash that appears when the application is launched on machines with AMD "Navi" GPUs without drivers installed. The ASUS ROG skin has been fixed to properly show the "Close" button in the bottom. We also improved the memory junction temperature tooltip on AMD "Navi" to denote that the hottest chip's junction temperature is being reported, and not an average across all chips. Last version's AMD Navi fan-stop fix has been reverted since AMD fixed the issue since their 19.9.1 drivers. PCIe and CrossFire state detection has been fixed for AMD "Navi" and "Vega 20" based graphics cards. Grab it from the link below.

DOWNLOAD: TechPowerUp GPU-Z v2.26.0
The change-log follows.

AMD to Slash Radeon RX 5700 "Navi" Series Prices Ahead of Launch: $399 & $349

NVIDIA attempted to torpedo the Radeon RX 5700 "Navi" series graphics card launch with the introduction of its $499 GeForce RTX 2070 Super and $399 RTX 2060 Super. AMD claimed that its upcoming Radeon RX 5700 XT outperformed the original RTX 2070, while its smaller sibling, the RX 5700 outperforms the original RTX 2060. In its E3-2019 reveal, AMD disclosed launch prices of the RX 5700 XT and the RX 5700 to be USD $449 and $379, respectively. The RTX Super launch jeopardizes this, and so, according to VideoCardz, AMD is revising its launch prices.

The Radeon RX 5700 XT now reportedly launches at just $399, while the Radeon RX 5700 is priced at $349. The RX 5700 XT is claimed to beat the original RTX 2070, while the $399 RTX 2060 Super is slower than the RTX 2070. On the other hand, the RX 5700, which was claimed to beat the $349 original RTX 2060, is now price-matched with it, unless NVIDIA comes up with price-cuts. Older reports suggested that with the advent of the RTX Super series, NVIDIA would retire the RTX 2060 and RTX 2070, after the market digests inventories left in the channel. AMD's latest move is sure to disturb that digestion.

Update Jul 6th: This has been confirmed officially by AMD here.

NVIDIA GeForce RTX 2060 Super Smiles for the Camera

Here are some of the first live pictures (not renders) of the upcoming GeForce RTX 2060 Super graphics card. As with the rest of the RTX 20 Super-series, this card features a reference board design resembling that of the original RTX 20-series, but with a chrome embellishment that accommodates the "Super" badge. The RTX 2060 Super is designed to compete with the upcoming Radeon RX 5700 at USD $399, or $50 more than the original RTX 2060. It's based on the "TU106" silicon, and is configured with 2,176 CUDA cores, but more importantly, a memory setup that's both 33 percent larger and faster than that of the original RTX 2060, made up of 8 GB of GDDR6 memory across a 256-bit wide bus, clocked at 14 Gbps. The card is expected to perform halfway between the RTX 2060 and RTX 2070.

NVIDIA RTX SUPER Lineup Detailed, Pricing Outed

NVIDIA has officially confirmed pricing and SKU availability for its refreshed Turing lineup featuring the SUPER graphics cards we've been talking about for ages now. Primed as a way to steal AMD's Navi release thunder, the new SUPER lineup means previously-released NVIDIA gppahics cards have now hit an EOL-status as soon as their souped-up, SUPER versions are available, come July 2nd.

The RTX 2060 and RTX 2080 Ti will live on, for now, as the cheapest and most powerful entries unto the world of hardware-based raytracing acceleration, respectively. The RTX 2070 and RTX 2080, however, will be superseded by the corresponding 2070 SUPER and 2080 SUPER offerings, with an additional RTX 2060 SUPER being offered so as to compete with AMD's RX 5700 ($399 for NVIDIA's new RTX 2060 SUPER vs $379 for the AMD RX 5700, which is sandwiched in the low-end by the RTX 2060 at $349).

NVIDIA to Unveil GeForce RTX SUPER Lineup on July 2nd

NVIDIA has confirmed that they will be launching a new RTX series of gaming graphics cards, called RTX Super, on July 2nd. According to info from VideoCardz, there will be three models of the new GPUs at launch - RTX 2060 SUPER, RTX 2070 SUPER and RTX 2080 SUPER. The review embargo will lift on the same day as launch day for RTX 2060 SUPER and RTX 2070 SUPER, but the embargo for RTX 2080 SUPER will prevail until "later in July".

The embargo for custom cards based on the new SUPER GPUs will be delayed until July 9th, when we will get the first wave of new cards. There is no apparent reason for the delay, so we will need to find out more about that. Pricing is yet to be announced, but according to the source, it will be "later this week". As a reminder, from previous leaks we have seen that Super series is supposed to bring about 10-13% more CUDA cores to the GPU models, more memory and higher memory speeds.

NVIDIA's SUPER Tease Rumored to Translate Into an Entire Lineup Shift Upwards for Turing

NVIDIA's SUPER teaser hasn't crystallized into something physical as of now, but we know it's coming - NVIDIA themselves saw to it that our (singularly) collective minds would be buzzing about what that teaser meant, looking to steal some thunder from AMD's E3 showing. Now, that teaser seems to be coalescing into something amongst the industry: an entire lineup upgrade for Turing products, with NVIDIA pulling their chips up one rung of the performance chair across their entire lineup.

Apparently, NVIDIA will be looking to increase performance across the board, by shuffling their chips in a downward manner whilst keeping the current pricing structure. This means that NVIDIA's TU106 chip, which powered their RTX 2070 graphics card, will now be powering the RTX 2060 SUPER (with a reported core count of 2176 CUDA cores). The TU104 chip, which power the current RTX 2080, will in the meantime be powering the SUPER version of the RTX 2070 (a reported 2560 CUDA cores are expected to be onboard), and the TU102 chip which powered their top-of-the-line RTX 2080 Ti will be brought down to the RTX 2080 SUPER (specs place this at 8 GB GDDR6 VRAM and 3072 CUDA cores). This carves the way for an even more powerful SKU in the RTX 2080 Ti SUPER, which should be launched at a later date. Salty waters say the RTX 2080 Ti SUPER will feature and unlocked chip which could be allowed to convert up to 300 W into graphics horsepower, so that's something to keep an eye - and a power meter on - for sure. Less defined talks suggest that NVIDIA will be introducing an RTX 2070 Ti SUPER equivalent with a new chip as well.

AMD Radeon RX 5700 XT and RX 5700 to Have Same Memory and ROP Configuration

In a bid to bolster competitiveness of the $379 Radeon RX 5700 (non-XT) against its rival from the NVIDIA camp, the GeForce RTX 2060, AMD is leaving the memory configuration completely unchanged from the faster $449 Radeon RX 5700 XT. The RX 5700 will get 8 GB of GDDR6 memory across a 256-bit wide memory bus, with the same 14 Gbps memory speed as the RX 5700 XT. This works out to a memory bandwidth of 448 GB/s. In comparison, the $349 (launch price) RTX 2060 only has 6 GB of memory, across a 192-bit wide memory bus. With a memory speed of 14 Gbps, this setup achieves 336 GB/s.

The other area where AMD is reinforcing the RX 5700 is its raster muscle. The RX 5700 has the same 64 ROPs as the RX 5700 XT. AMD carved this SKU out by disabling two workgroup processors (four RDNA compute units), reducing the stream processor count to 2,304. This also turns down the TMU count from 160 to 144. The GPU engine clock speeds are also reduced, with 1465 MHz base, 1625 MHz "gaming clocks," and 1725 MHz boost clocks; compared to 1605/1755/1905 MHz of the RX 5700 XT. The RX 5700 has a typical board power of 180W compared to the 224W of the RX 5700 XT. Custom design cards may even feature just one 8-pin PCIe power input, while some of the premium factory-overclocked designs could use 8-pin + 6-pin configurations.

Colorful Brings it Shiniest New Toys to Computex 2019

Colorful always believed in shock-and-awe to market their overengineered graphics cards and motherboards; and the company did not disappoint this Computed. We saw their new iGame RTX 2080 Ti Kudan, a 5-fan monstrosity that could very well be the heaviest graphics card ever built. A triple-slot, triple-fan air-cooler copes with some of the heat from the GPU, all of the heat from the VRM and memory; while most of the heat is dissipated by a closed-loop liquid cooling solution that uses a massive radiator that's almost as big as a standard 360 mm x 120 mm, but only has two 120 mm spinners, and 1/3rd of its body made up of a coolant reservoir and integrated pump. The block over the GPU is entirely metal (both base and top), so it could shed some of its heat onto the card's heatsink. How fast is it? Well, out of the box it's a damp 1545 MHz, but has a "one-click OC" to 1815 MHz.

FinalWire Releases AIDA64 v6.00

FinalWire Ltd. today announced the immediate availability of AIDA64 Extreme 6.00 software, a streamlined diagnostic and benchmarking tool for home users; the immediate availability of AIDA64 Engineer 6.00 software, a professional diagnostic and benchmarking solution for corporate IT technicians and engineers; the immediate availability of AIDA64 Business 6.00 software, an essential network management solution for small and medium scale enterprises; and the immediate availability of AIDA64 Network Audit 6.00 software, a dedicated network audit toolset to collect and manage corporate network inventories.

The latest AIDA64 update introduces SHA3-512 cryptographic hash benchmark and AVX2 optimized benchmarks for the upcoming AMD Zen 2 "Matisse" processors, adds monitoring of sensor values on BeadaPanel LCD displays, and supports the latest AMD and Intel CPU platforms as well as the new graphics and GPGPU computing technologies by both AMD and NVIDIA.
DOWNLOAD: FinalWire AIDA64 v6.00

Sapphire Reps Leak Juicy Details on AMD Radeon Navi

A Sapphire product manager and PR director, speaking to the Chinese press spilled the beans on AMD's upcoming Radeon Navi graphics card lineup. It looks like with Navi, AMD is targeting the meat of the serious gamer market, at two specific price points, USD $399 with a "Pro" (cut-down) product, and $499 with an "XT" (fully-fledged) product. AMD has two NVIDIA products in its crosshairs, the GeForce RTX 2070, and the RTX 2060. In the interview, the Sapphire rep mentioned "stronger than 2070", when talking about performance numbers, which we assume is for the Navi XT variant - definitely promising. The $399 Navi "Pro" is probably being designed with a performance target somewhere between the RTX 2060 and RTX 2070, so you typically pay $50 more than you would for an RTX 2060, for noticeably higher performance.

Sapphire also confirmed that AMD's Navi does not have specialized ray-tracing hardware on the silicon, but such technology will debut with "next year's new architecture". They also suggested that AMD is unlikely to scale up Navi for the enthusiast segment, and that the Vega-based Radeon VII will continue to be the company's flagship product. On the topic of Radeon VII custom designs, Sapphire commented that "there is no plans for that". On the other hand, Sapphire is actively working on custom designs for the Navi architecture, and mentioned that "work on a "Toxic" version of Navi is complete, and it is watercooled". Many people have speculated that AMD will unveil Navi at its Computex keynote address on May 27. Sapphire confirmed that date, and also added that the launch will be on 7th of July, 2019.

Dell Ends up Leaking Mobile GTX 1660 Ti Trying to Refute RTX 2050 "Typo"

Dell inadvertently confirmed that a mobile version of the GeForce GTX 1660 Ti graphics processor is in the works and coming to one of its G5 15 laptop models. The best part? The company was refuting the leak of another unannounced product, the "RTX 2050. " Calling it a typo, the company in a pop-up message for its G5 15 variant configurator. Apparently there are two main variants of this notebook, one with USB-C that has Thunderbolt, USB 3.1, and DisplayPort wiring; and another variant with just USB-C with USB 3.1 and DisplayPort minus Thunderbolt.

The company originally mentioned that variants with RTX 2060 and above get Thunderbolt, while those with "RTX 2050" only get USB 3.1 and DisplayPort out of their USB-C ports. In its correction, the company replaced "RTX 2050" with "GTX 1660 Ti." What the webmasters don't know is that mobile GTX 1660 Ti is unannounced, and it's unlikely that Dell is using a desktop GTX 1660 Ti on a notebook of this form-factor (this isn't one of those Eurocom-made desktop-replacement monstrosities).

NVIDIA Updates RTX Game Bundle - Now Also Includes Metro Exodus

NVIDIA has updated their RTX game bundle, which offers users games whenever they purchase an elligible RTX graphics card. The bundle previously offered wither Anthem or Battlefield V, for gamers who purchased the RTX 2060 or 2070 graphics card; and both games for buyers of the RTX 2080 and RTX 2080 Ti. Now, gamers who purchase NVIDIA's highest-performacne graphics cards also get to take Metro Exodus home, and buyers of the RTX 2060 and RTX 2070 can now choose that game over the others.

Galax Readies 17.5 cm-long RTX 2070 and RTX 2060 Mini Graphics Cards

Galax is readying compact 17.5 cm long GeForce RTX 2070 and RTX 2060 for the Japanese market, distributed exclusively by Kurouto Shikou. The common board design for both models retains its short length despite not being taller than the ATX standard height, and is no thicker than 2-slot. It uses a dense aluminium fin-stack heatsink that's ventilated by a pair of 80 mm fans. The RTX 2070 Mini (GK-RTX2070-E8GB/MINI) ticks at GPU Boost frequencies of 1620 MHz, while the RTX 2060 Mini (GK-RTX2060-E6GB/MINI) does 1650 MHz. Both cards offer one-each of DisplayPort, DVI, and HDMI; and draw power from a single 8-pin PCIe power connector.

NVIDIA GTX 1660 Ti to Perform Roughly On-par with GTX 1070: Leaked Benchmarks

NVIDIA's upcoming "Turing" based GeForce GTX 1660 Ti graphics card could carve itself a value proposition between the $250-300 mark that lets it coexist with both the GTX 1060 6 GB and the $350 RTX 2060, according to leaked "Final Fantasy XV" benchmarks scored by VideoCardz. In these benchmarks, the GTX 1660 Ti was found to perform roughly on par with the previous-generation GTX 1070 (non-Ti), which is plausible given that the 1,536 CUDA cores based on "Turing," architecture, with their higher IPC and higher GPU clocks, are likely to catch up with the 1,920 "Pascal" CUDA cores of the GTX 1070, while 12 Gbps 192-bit GDDR6 serves up more memory bandwidth than 8 Gbps 256-bit GDDR5 (288 GB/s vs. 256 GB/s). The GTX 1070 scores in memory size, with 8 GB of it. NVIDIA is expected to launch the GTX 1660 Ti later this month at USD $279. Unlike the RTX 20-series, these chips lack NVIDIA RTX real-time raytracing technology, and DLSS (deep-learning supersampling).

Tight Squeeze Below $350 as Price of GTX 1660 Ti Revealed

NVIDIA is reportedly pricing the GeForce GTX 1660 Ti at USD $279 (baseline pricing), which implies pricing of custom-designed and factory-overclocked cards scraping the $300-mark. The card is also spaced $70 apart from the RTX 2060, which offers not just 25% more CUDA cores, but also NVIDIA RTX and DLSS technologies. In media reporting of the card so far, it is being compared extensively to the GTX 1060 6 GB, which continues to go for under $230. Perhaps NVIDIA is planning a slower non-Ti version to replace the GTX 1060 6 GB under the $250-mark. That entry would place three SKUs within $50-70 of each other, a tight squeeze. Based on the 12 nm TU116 silicon, the GTX 1660 Ti is rumored to feature 1,536 CUDA cores, 96 TMUs, 48 ROPs, and a 192-bit wide GDDR6 memory interface, handling 6 GB of memory at 12 Gbps (288 GB/s). This GPU lacks RT cores.

NVIDIA TU116 GPU Pictured Up Close: Noticeably Smaller than TU106

Here is the first picture of NVIDIA's 12 nm "TU116" silicon, which powers the upcoming GeForce GTX 1660 Ti graphics card. While the size of the package itself is identical to that of the "TU106" on which the RTX 2060 and RTX 2070 are based; the die of the TU116 is visibly smaller. This is because the chip physically lacks RT cores, and only has two-thirds the number of CUDA cores as the TU106, with 1,536 against the latter's 2,304. The die area, too, is about 2/3rds that of the TU106. The ASIC version of TU116 powering the GTX 1660 Ti is "TU116-400-A1."

VideoCardz scored not just pictures of the ASIC, but also the PCB of an MSI GTX 1660 Ti Ventus graphics card, which reveals something very interesting. The PCB has traces for eight memory chips, across a 256-bit wide memory bus, although only six of them are populated with memory chips, making up 6 GB over a 192-bit bus. The GPU's package substrate, too, is of the same size. It's likely that NVIDIA is using a common substrate, with an identical pin-map between the TU106 and TU116, so AIC partners could reduce PCB development costs.

Palit and EVGA GeForce GTX 1660 Ti Cards Pictured

As we inch closer to the supposed 15th February launch of the GeForce GTX 1660 Ti, pictures of more AIC partner branded custom-design cards. The first two of these are from Palit and EVGA. Palit is bringing two very compact cards to the table under its StormX banner. These cards appear to be under 18 cm in length, and use an aluminium fin-stack cooler that's ventilated by a single 100 mm fan. There are two grades based on factory-overclock. The base model ticks at 1770 MHz boost, while the OC variant offers 1815 MHz boost.

EVGA's GTX 1660 Ti lineup includes two cards under its XC brand, with both cards being under 20 cm in length, but are 3 slots thick. Both cards appear to be using the same 3-slot single-fan cooling solution as the company's RTX 2060 XC. Once again, we see two variants based on clock-speeds, with the "Black" variant sticking to 1770 MHz boost, and the XC version slightly dialing up that frequency. Based on the 12 nm "TU116" silicon, the GTX 1660 Ti is rumored to feature 1,536 CUDA cores based on the "Turing" architecture, but lacking in RTX technology. The SKU succeeds the GTX 1060 6 GB.

ASUS Debuts GeForce RTX 2060 TUF Gaming Graphics Card

With ASUS extending its TUF Gaming brand to pretty much every mainstream gamer-centric product, including co-branded hardware, it was only a matter of time before it built graphics cards with that badge again. Its first attempt was the GTX 950 TUF Echelon from way back in 2016. The new GeForce RTX 2060 TUF gaming is a stout little RTX 2060 card with around 20 cm in board length, 12.5 cm height, and 2-slot thickness. Pulling power from a single 8-pin PCIe power connector, it's one of the very few RTX 20-series cards to feature a DVI connector in addition to two DisplayPort 1.4 and a HDMI 2.0b.

The RTX 2060 TUF Gaming board design consists of a twin fan cooling solution, which uses an aluminium fin-stack heatsink that pulls heat from the GPU using two 6 mm-thick copper heat pipes that make flattened direct contact at the base; while two 80 mm double ball-bearing fans with IP5X (dust-proof) impellers ventilate the heatsink. There is no 0 dBA idle fan-off mode. You do get a full-coverage back-plate. ASUS is releasing this card in two SKUs based on clock-speeds, the TUF-RTX2060-6G, and the overclocked TUF-RTX2060-O6G. The latter ships with 1710 MHz boost clocks compared to 1689 MHz of the former. Both cards are expected to be priced well under $370.

GIGABYTE Readies Out GeForce RTX 2060 Gaming OC Pro White

GIGABYTE is readying the GeForce RTX 2060 Gaming OC Pro White graphics card (GV-N2060GAMINGOC WHITE-6GC). A variant of the RTX 2060 Gaming OC Pro, the card features a white cooler shroud with chrome inserts, and an all-white metal back-plate. Contrasting the white is matte-black fan impellers capped with chrome hub stickers, and a black PCB that's carried over from the original.

The cooling solution features three aluminium fin-stacks arranged along four 6 mm-thick copper heat pipes that make direct contact with the GPU at the aluminium base. Heat drawn from the memory and VRM are transferred to this base by a secondary aluminium plate. Three 90 mm fans spinning in alternate directions (albeit same airflow direction), ventilate the heatsink. The card features idle fan-stop, which spools down the fans below a load/temperature threshold. The card draws power from a single 8-pin PCIe power connector. Display outputs include three DisplayPort and an HDMI 2.0. The card features GIGABYTE's highest factory-overclock for the RTX 2060, with 1830 MHz GPU Boost, although the memory frequency is untouched. The RTX 2060 Gaming OC Pro White could feature a minor $10-20 premium over the $379 MSRP of the original.

NVIDIA Readies GeForce GTX 1660 Ti Based on TU116, Sans RTX

It looks like RTX technology won't make it to sub-$250 market segments as the GPUs aren't fast enough to handle real-time raytracing, and it makes little economic sense for NVIDIA to add billions of additional transistors for RT cores. The company is hence carving out a sub-class of "Turing" GPUs under the TU11x ASIC series, which will power new GeForce GTX family SKUs, such as the GeForce GTX 1660 Ti, and other GTX 1000-series SKUs. These chips offer "Turing Shaders," which are basically CUDA cores that have the IPC and clock-speeds rivaling existing "Turing" GPUs, but no RTX capabilities. To sweeten the deal, NVIDIA will equip these cards with GDDR6 memory. These GPUs could still have tensor cores which are needed to accelerate DLSS, a feature highly relevant to this market segment.

The GeForce GTX 1660 Ti will no doubt be slower than the RTX 2060, and be based on a new ASIC codenamed TU116. According to a VideoCardz report, this 12 nm chip packs 1,536 CUDA cores based on the "Turing" architecture, and the same exact memory setup as the RTX 2060, with 6 GB of GDDR6 memory across a 192-bit wide memory interface. The lack of RT cores and a lower CUDA core count could make the TU116 a significantly smaller chip than the TU106, and something NVIDIA can afford to sell at sub-$300 price-points such as $250. The GTX 1060 6 GB is holding the fort for NVIDIA in this segment, besides other GTX 10-series SKUs such as the GTX 1070 occasionally dropping below the $300 mark at retailers' mercy. AMD recently improved its sub-$300 portfolio with the introduction of Radeon RX 590, which convincingly outperforms the GTX 1060 6 GB.

Manli Rolls Out its GeForce RTX 2060 Series

Manli Technology Group Limited, the major Graphics Cards and other components manufacturer, today unveiled the new GeForce RTX 2060 family - Manli GeForce RTX 2060 with three solutions: blower style fan, twin cooler design and overclocking version. Manli GeForce RTX 2060 family is powered by the NVIDIA Turning GPU architecture and delivering ray tracing technology. Moreover, it is built-in 1,920 CUDA Cores which has increased up to 50% compared with previous generation, and the core frequency is at 1365 MHz which can boost up to 1680 MHz.

Manli GeForce RTX 2060 Gallardo & Manli GeForce RTX 2060 with Twin Cooler: Manli GeForce RTX 2060 Gallardo & RTX 2060 are both built with dual 8 cm fan and three copper heatpipes which provide effective heat dissipation. Specially, Manli GeForce RTX 2060 Gallardo is features of up to 5% more overclocking clock compared with standard version.

MSI's RTX 2080 Ti Lightning Z, Among Other Offerings, Smiles For the Camera

MSI showed off their GeForce RTX 2080 Ti Lightning at CES 2019. This latest and greatest offering from them is built around overclocking with the graphics card having been designed with a 19-phase power delivery subsystem and 3x 8-pin power connectors. It offers a dual BIOS support with the default BIOS coming with a factory overclock of 1770 MHz while the second BIOS is configured for LN2 and comes with NVIDIA's reference clock speeds but offers a boosted power limit of 350-watts. Display connectivity options consisted of 3x DisplayPort, 1x HDMI and 1x USB Type-C output for VirtualLink.

Razer Shows Off Raptor Gaming Monitor, RTX Equipped Laptops at CES 2019

Razer a dominant player in the PC peripherals market is looking to make their mark when it comes to monitors with their all-new Razer Raptor gaming monitor. Its a 27-inch display featuring an IPS panel with a resolution of 2560x1440. It comes with support for FreeSync and has a refresh rate of 144 Hz. Response times are listed as 7 ms typical and 4 ms with Overdrive. The contrast ratio is 1000:1 and the screen has a max brightness of 420 nits. It also offers 95% of the P3-D65 color gamut, and yes it has support for HDR. Connectivity consists of 1x HDMI 2.0, 1x DisplayPort 1.4, 1x USB Type-C with power delivery and 2x USB 3.0.

The design features a wide stand that offers excellent stability while also providing channels for cable routing giving the system a clean and unique appearance especially with those bright green cables. As expected of Razer the Raptor monitor also supports Chrome-powered lights in the base which will sync with the rest of Razer's Chrome gear including, mice, keyboards and even laptops and speakers. In regards to availability, no date has been set just yet; however, Razer said it would be made available later this year with an MSRP of $699.99.

Bitspower at CES 2019- New Blocks, Sensor Displays, Fans, and LN2 Cooling!

CES may have officially ended but our coverage from the trade show continues. Bitspower had invited TechPowerUp to come visit their suite, mentioning there would be something new and unexpected, and that indeed was the case. Our tour began with the customary showcase of the new GPU water blocks compatible with reference, and board partner designs, for the new NVIDIA GeForce RTX 2060 and relatively new AIC RTX 2070/80(Ti) cards as well. These feature integrated RGB lighting compatible with all major motherboard lighting solutions for control, and adopt the split central-inlet flow design as well.
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