Friday, October 16th 2009

Danger Den Announces DD-5870 Water Block

Danger Den continues to extend their broad line of full coverage video card blocks with the new ATI 5870 water block. The DD-5870 block is a single slot solution cooling all of the major heat components including the GPU, RAM, power mofsets, and more.

The DD-5870 block is designed to have superior cooling performance while minimizing the pressure loss across the block. This combined with other Danger Den blocks maintains a high flow rate through the entire system maximizing the cooling performance of all the components.

Danger Den, based in Astoria, OR, has improved their in-house production process and is now able to offer the DD-5870 at the incredible price of $99.95. The DD-5870 will be available to order on October 16th.

The product page lists all of the details and any questions can be answered in the Danger Den Forums.
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12 Comments on Danger Den Announces DD-5870 Water Block

#1
kylew
Water blocks are so horribly overpriced.
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#2
EastCoasthandle
Copper isn't cheap. That's the problem IMO. Besides, you don't have to use a full cover WB. Instead you can use the frontplate from the video card and the GPU WB which should be cheaper.
Posted on Reply
#3
aCid888*
EastCoasthandle said:
Copper isn't cheap. That's the problem IMO.
Copper may not be cheap but this is a simple case of supply and demand; also the fact that its a niche market and not many people want them so their value goes up allowing you to charge more. :)
Posted on Reply
#4
kylew
aCid888* said:
Copper may not be cheap but this is a simple case of supply and demand; also the fact that its a niche market and not many people want them so their value goes up allowing you to charge more. :)
This pretty much, I know copper isn't cheap, but the price you pay versus what they pay is massively different.

It's just a case of supply and demand.
Posted on Reply
#5
EastCoasthandle
aCid888* said:
Copper may not be cheap but this is a simple case of supply and demand; also the fact that its a niche market and not many people want them so their value goes up allowing you to charge more. :)
Regardless, the cost to make a full cover waterblock has always been more expensive then getting a gpu WB. If what you say were true then the cost of a GPU WB's would be on par with a full cover waterblock because that too is a niche market. Full cover water blocks such as this has and will always cost more. From what I've learned it's cost has to do with the amount of material used to create them (although there are other factors involved).
Posted on Reply
#6
erocker
$99 bucks isn't a bad deal at all. Look at the price for a heatkiller CPU block, now that price is nuts and people love them. You have to pay to be 1337. :p
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#7
pr0n Inspector
Copper is... not cheap? Ok it may not be as cheap as iron or aluminium but it's still kind of cheap....
Posted on Reply
#8
WarEagleAU
Bird of Prey
yes it is, I think its currently around 2 or 3 bucks a pound, not expensive at all. If they didn't charge so much, more folks would be apt to buy them I think. Either way ,that is a nice block.
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#9
my_name_is_earl
Yes, copper is very cheap but making them is not so cheap. You need mods, tools, and expensive machine to make it look professional. I was building and designing my own custom acrylic case for PC and the material (acrylic) cost around $160 or so but the tools (rotary, bolt/nuts, saw table, blade, etc..) cost so much more. In the end, I ended up spending around $700 for the project [insert sad face]. Not to include a week long of drafting a making a blueprint before ordering parts to cut.
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#10
PP Mguire
Its not the material that cost its the labor and the machinery used to make it.
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#11
Bjorn_Of_Iceland
yuck.. dd gpu blocks really looks ugly.. imo, utilizing curves for a square shaped pcb is somewhat out of place...
Posted on Reply
#12
SNiiPE_DoGG
CNC mill time is generally around 50$ an hour wholesale price and DD uses very nice machines that would easily cost an average user $100+ an hour to use - not to mention R&D costs and paying the bills for the company.

$99 is a wonderful deal :D
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