Friday, August 27th 2010

Thermaltake Launches Jing Silent CPU Cooler

Thermaltake, leading DIY thermal solutions brand, launch their latest CPU air-cooler specifically developed for silent operation while maintaining a maximum of cooling efficiency, the Thermaltake Jing. Its name is derived from the Chinese, representing “Silence” and carrying with it the concepts of comfort, excellence and exquisiteness. The universal socket support makes it compatible to all computer processors currently available on the market. With a maximum cooling capacity of up to 200W and an almost un-audible noise level of 16 dBA at a fan speed of 800 RPM, the Jing CPU cooler is the ideal solution for noise sensitive users expecting uncompromising performance.

Unlike traditional up-side-down air flow designs, the Jing utilizes a tower side-flow design to optimize cooling performance. To attain maximum cooling performance, Thermaltake’s Jing adopts 5 Φ6mm high-efficiency heat-pipes conducting heat from the Nickel coated mirror base directly into the cooling tower which is made of 41 0.5 mm thick specially designed aluminum fins to increase the overall thermal dissipation area. The two preinstalled extra silent 120 mm VR fans can be manually adjusted between 800RPM and 1300RPM according to differing user needs. Through their inhale-exhaust reverse fan design a greater airflow is achieved resulting in enhanced thermal performance.
By utilizing a particularly thin fan enclosure frame which is open to all four sides, noise generated by the airflow is reduced as much as any possible. Additionally a recess in the cooling fins at the entry and exit points of the airflow creates something similar to an air-cushion, giving the air an optimized angel to stream into between the cooling fins while at the same time reducing noise development even further. All of these measures make the Jing CPU cooler Silent by Design.


The Thermaltake Jing CPU cooler is available at a suggested retail price of US$59.99.

For detailed information about the Thermaltake Jing, go to this page.
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56 Comments on Thermaltake Launches Jing Silent CPU Cooler

#1
p_o_s_pc
F@H&WCG addict
i have had this cooler for about a month now.
The fans are easily replaced and the green part on top is removed by taking out a few screws.
It isn't a bad cooler. It handles my i7 @3.6ghz fine and i'm sure it would handle it at higher speeds but i'm very picky about temps.
Posted on Reply
#2
Dent1
Either I read that wrong, or you don't understand what constitutes a push-pull fan setup. :wtf:
You read it wrong, most likely.

Essentially what iam saying is if two adjacent fans are blowing air in opposing directions will there not be trapped heat in the center of the heatsink and hence cause the temps to rise.
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#3
theonedub
habe fidem
^ what fans are blowing in opposing directions? There are 2 fans on the cooler, one is pushing air through it and the other is pulling air through it (hence push pull). Air is not going to get trapped in the middle.

I would say watch the video if you don't understand how that works.
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#4
DonInKansas
Where is the fans blowing in opposite directions? One fan blows air through the HS< the other pulls it out. The air is alll flowing one direction.

EDIT:

Friggin onedub is a bitchin' ninja.....:laugh:
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#5
popswala
I actually like this. Greens my fav color. Plus it looks diff then some huge silver/black box sitting in there. I would totally use this. Doesn't look to bad benched either. Pretty quiet.
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#6
sneekypeet
Unpaid Babysitter
LAN_deRf_HA said:
Seems consistent, but I'm not sure how accurate that is. Above average workloads (not 3d) up cpu temp much more than 4-5c. More like 15-20c. If this is accurate then that would mean chipset/ram is 75% of a cpu's load heat. Is that really the case? Or are you just not putting much heat into the faux cpu? Especially wondering if that would be true given how many cooler tests are on open well ventilated benches that I'd assume would close that gap if that were the cause of the heat, which they don't.

If it's not pushing the coolers realistically in the load tests then that makes the rankings inaccurate, as we've seen before the performance gap between coolers really only shows up at higher heat loads. Push the average into the 80s and new gaps start showing up, push the average into the 90s and gaps that were slight before become hugely exaggerated. This is why I've always felt we need 3 speed tests, stock, average overclock, then something high but achievable by an enthusiast for 24/7 (like 4.2-4.4).

And I wouldn't just automatically assume a manufacture is afraid of your testing method because it's so great, they may very well be avoiding it because it isn't.
Think what you want, I have been told by them they dont like it. Also if our setup is so wrong why do "most" manufacturers use a similar setup in house. The only change we make is using a more realistic 40 degree ambient. Think what you want, I know the truth, I'm not here to say our method is "the" method, I am here to say how it works:p
Posted on Reply
#7
halfwaythere
First of all tweaktowns testing has nothing to do with reality. Secondly this a dumbed down/silence version of the Frio. For all of the recent coolers the base quality is of paramount importance especially when testing it on an i7 and unfortunately TT hasn't really got the hang of it.
Posted on Reply
#8
sneekypeet
Unpaid Babysitter
the Jing is actually more efficient than the Frio, Silent or not it can hold its own!

EDIT: they dont even use the same cooler under all the plastic;)
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#10
sneekypeet
Unpaid Babysitter
proof of what statement?
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#11
Athlon2K15
HyperVtX™
halfwaythere said:
First of all tweaktowns testing has nothing to do with reality. Secondly this a dumbed down/silence version of the Frio. For all of the recent coolers the base quality is of paramount importance especially when testing it on an i7 and unfortunately TT hasn't really got the hang of it.
first of all you have no clue at what reality is,tweaktown does some of the most in depth cooler testing,i have personally watched it being done. So before you post dumb ass remarks figure out your facts first. This cooler is NOT the same as the frio totally different under the plastic,and WTF are you talking about base quality? its a flat nickel base no grooves no HDT its just flat nickel plated. TT has made some really good coolers lately ive tested a few myself and they did as good as any other cooler.
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#12
halfwaythere
Dude I'm glad you are on the tweaktowns bandwagon but their 'indepth' testing is of zero relevance for the actual users. They use a uniformly heated piece of metal. How is that of any importance for a person that uses an actual cpu? They mash all of the products into a single chart with no info about fans used, ambient temps etc. According to them the CM V10 is the best air cooler. Nuff said.

The fact that you consider all solid bases the same says a lot about your level of ignorance regarding air coolers.

@seenkypeet: Any proof that the Jing is more efficient than the Frio. Alot of people with selective reading around here. :)
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#13
sneekypeet
Unpaid Babysitter
nope I have no proof at all;)
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#14
EaGle1337
Jingle bells jingle bells jingle all the jkerzcrankkkknnk, I think my thermaltake just ate a bell.
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#15
halfwaythere
AthlonX2 said:
your obviously a retard..the way tweaktown test's their coolers is exactly the same way companies do there in house testing:shadedshu
How old are you? Your language and logic seem to indicate you're probably 5.

Funnily enough on Frio's presentation video they've displayed it mounted on a cpu and not on some heated piece of metal.

Please get your facts straight, learn some proper English and manners and come back with something half decent.
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#16
pantherx12
Halfwaythere it is you who's logic is flawed, tweektowns testing methodology is what we in the business call "scientific" its fair and consistent with only ONE change the cooler ontop of the heat source.

Yes it's not precisely like sticking it on a cpu but guess what it still does the job! You get a comparison between coolers with precisely the same thermal load.



Did no one else get taught how to do scientific experiments ?



*edit* I was really expecting this to be a frio with different fans, after some image comparison it's nice to see TT not being cheap for once XD Although I still feel they could do even better and adjust the fin layout some what : ]
Posted on Reply
#17
halfwaythere
'we in the business'? Who are you? rofl

Scientific yet worthless. Wanna know why: because every cpu is different from another and assuming all could be simulated through a uniformly heated piece of metal is scientifically wrong and secondly a real cpu doesn't spread its heat uniformly because the cpu die is much smaller compared to the ihs.

Although I'm pretty sure most won't get it heres how real heatsink testing looks like:

http://lab501.ro/racire/arhitectura-hdt-intre-dezamagire-si-miracol
Posted on Reply
#18
pantherx12
Who am I?

Oh just someone intelligent. My business is the non stupid.

Also it's not worthless you are measuring thermal performance, that is it.

You don't need a CPU to measure thermal performance.

Hell you can test the thermal performance of a heat-sink by heating up a metal block to obscene temperatures sticking it on the heat-sink and seeing how long it takes before its safe to pick up ( I use my heat-sinks to cool down things I've welded/cut sometimes lol)

As-long as the comparison is there ( it is) that's all that is necessary, that they all receive the exact same thermal load spread across the exact same area makes this an extremely fair and accurate way of measuring thermal performance.

My only gripe with it is that they should have a "over-clocked" heat as well ( I didn't spot one, could be trippin') Since heat-pipes are often designed with a specific heat range in mind ( to hot and to cold turns them into regular pipes)


If I were in a lab this would be how I would test thermal performance, not by using a heat source that has inconsistent thermal out-put.

That would be stupid, and if I submitted those results to say a manager or another company I'd probably loose my job or get a talking to at the very least.


*edit* Thought I'd let you know that heat-sink manufacturers do infact test on hot-plates before they test on actual CPU ;)
Posted on Reply
#19
DonInKansas
halfwaythere said:
They mash all of the products into a single chart with no info about fans used, ambient temps etc. According to them the CM V10 is the best air cooler. Nuff said.
Throwing a whole bunch of numbers at people is pointless if the numbers don't mean anything. You care more about seeing variables and worthless numbers in testing instead of applauding them for taking as many variables OUT of testing as possible?

Posted on Reply
#20
halfwaythere
Ignorance is bliss. Keep believing the CM V10 is the best cooler.
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#21
pantherx12
halfwaythere said:
Ignorance is bliss. Keep believing the CM V10 is the best cooler.
I guess you can't read fella, the Noctua NH-D14 is the best cooler on tweek town, and pretty much EVERY other review site.


And considering the v-10s price the review ranks it lower than many other coolers.

Out of the coolers that tweektown have tested it is in fact 7th.




Oh by the way, heatsink testing! Super controlled.

Posted on Reply
#22
halfwaythere
I thought this is their chart with the V10 on top:



Whats the point of super controlled testing if the results don't reflect reality. I want to see actual cpus, thermal paste imprints, positioning tests, stock settings and overclocked ones. Also an apples to apples fans testing.
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#23
DrPepper
The Doctor is in the house
halfwaythere said:
I thought this is their chart with the V10 on top:

http://images.tweaktown.com/content/3/4/3420_19.png

Whats the point of super controlled testing if the results don't reflect reality. I want to see actual cpus, thermal paste imprints, positioning tests, stock settings and overclocked ones. Also an apples to apples fans testing.
Who cares what you want to see ? If you don't like it move on and "quit bitchin'"
Posted on Reply
#24
JATownes
I think the scientific method has with stood the test of time.
When an experiment is conducted for the purpose of determining the effect of a single variable of interest on a particular system, a scientific control is used to minimize the unintended influence of other variables on the same system. Such extraneous variables include researcher bias, environmental changes, and biological variation. Scientific controls ensure that data are valid, and are a vital part of the scientific method.
In this example the "single variable" would be heat or noise level. This same type of method is used the world over for everything from physics to biology. You must control/eliminate all variables to determine the validity of the hypothesis.
Source: Scientific Control
Posted on Reply
#25
halfwaythere
Synthetic heatsink testing is relevant for people using a heated piece of metal instead of a cpu. For the others I think using an actual cpu is better. I'm pretty sure tweaktown folks are nice people and well intentioned but unfortunately I don't find their testing methods good enough.
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