Monday, May 30th 2011

ASUS C1X79 EVO LGA2011 Motherboard Pictured

With the "entry level" of its socket LGA2011 lineup, ASUS is making a return to its signature gold-colored PCB with the C1X79 EVO. Based on the Intel X79 Express chipset, the board provides a basic feature-set sticking to whatever the chipset provides. The LGA2011 socket is powered by a simple 6+1 phase VRM, the two DDR3 DIMM slots are located on either sides of the socket in groups of two, and are powered by a 4-phase VRM.

Expansion slots include three PCI-Express 3.0 x16 (electrical x16/x16/NC or x16/x8/x8, depending on whether the third slot is populated), two PCI-E x1, and an open-ended PCI-E x4. All 10 of the SATA 6 Gb/s ports provided by the X79 chipset are assigned as internal ports, apart from four additional 3 Gb/s ports. That aside, there's little in terms of connectivity, with just the 8+2 channel HD audio, dual gigabit Ethernet, and a couple of USB 3.0 ports. The board uses ASUS' UEFI setup program with EZMode. We're not entirely sure if the production version of this board sticks to the golden PCB color, let's hope it does.
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36 Comments on ASUS C1X79 EVO LGA2011 Motherboard Pictured

#1
kinc
ASUS Representative
Sihastru said:
Those are Intel XDP connectors for debugging purposes (eg. CPU interposers). All these boards are engineering samples. The retail versions won't have these ports.
Yeah, these particular samples shown at computex are the ones used by BIOS-team for UEFI development.
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#2
MicroUnC
This may sound weird! But i like the colour. I want!!!
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#3
WarraWarra
Great stuff look at the pci-e spacing finally dual / tri bridged gpu with enough space to breath.
You go Asus, finally there is competent hardware manufacturers out there.

Hopefully the Intel 2011 cpu's should be available soon, just not in the mood to beta all the drivers and other bugs that a new cpu will come with.
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#4
Assimilator
WarraWarra said:
Great stuff look at the pci-e spacing finally dual / tri bridged gpu with enough space to breath.
You go Asus, finally there is competent hardware manufacturers out there.
THIS! I'm not too happy that it only has 6 expansion slots but I much prefer a better slot layout than a full complement. Interesting that all the non-full-length PCIe slots are open-ended, although that's probably just because this is an ES.

Also, 14 - FOURTEEN - SATA ports on an "entry-level" board? I would've thought the whopping 10 provided by the chipset would be more than enough, but this.... just wow.
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#5
cheesy999
unusable for me with no PS/2
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#6
vanyots
It's not entry-level.

Enough with the "entry-level" nonsense.
It's not like this is a H61 chipset for your i3.
It'll cost more than most top-grade Z68 boards and will most likely be used in servers and production workstations. So the 12-14 SATA ports aren't unusual.
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#7
buggalugs
kinc said:
It is a ES board, the final board will not look like this. You can even see the ITP connectors used for UEFI development on it :) (below 24-pin)
Thanks for the info, i thought that was the case.

And for people saying "not enough memory slots", we are going to see 8Gb sticks soon so 32Gb is enough for most people.

For the average home user, a 4x2Gb (8Gb) kit is plenty and should cost around $100.

If you need more get a 4x4Gb or 4x8Gb.
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#8
Jonap_1st
feels like watching "back to the future"..
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#9
lilhasselhoffer
slyfox2151 said:
perhaps... but then again now you get Quad Channel, not to mention 4GB sticks are becoming pretty common now, that gives you 16GB of ram.

More than enough for most.
if you need more then this board is not targeted towards you.... for those who need more, likely also need error correction.


if your part of the VERY FEW PEOPLE! that want/need more then 16GB of ram without needing a server board then im sure they will also have 1 or 2 for you with extra ram slots.
Limited view of the potential? I like ripping my dvd collection to my hard drive and to formats that I can use (mobile media anyone?). If you have a ram disk of 9GB (dual layer dvd + extra) the processing speed will be dramatically higher. Combine that with the blisteringly fast 6 core, 12 threaded, beast that the enthusiast class will be and you've got a ripped and transcoded video file in less time than it takes to play it. Not a server application.

I see why they would skimp, especially given that these boards are about as far from production as possible while still functioning, but 1366 skimping in the beginning (yes, memory serves well) was just as inexcusable. I'm looking forward to making my 64 bit OS finally do some extreme lifting, and having my disk drives last longer because the paging file is a dedicated segment of my ram (I might have a thing for ram disk...).

Assimilator said:
THIS! I'm not too happy that it only has 6 expansion slots but I much prefer a better slot layout than a full complement. Interesting that all the non-full-length PCIe slots are open-ended, although that's probably just because this is an ES.

Also, 14 - FOURTEEN - SATA ports on an "entry-level" board? I would've thought the whopping 10 provided by the chipset would be more than enough, but this.... just wow.
You read the spec sheets from x79? The thing comes with 14 SATA, of which 10 are capable of SATA III (6 Gb/s) speeds. The pictures were posted a while back in this article: http://www.techpowerup.com/forums/showthread.php?t=143179&highlight=x79.

vanyots said:
Enough with the "entry-level" nonsense.
It's not like this is a H61 chipset for your i3.
It'll cost more than most top-grade Z68 boards and will most likely be used in servers and production workstations. So the 12-14 SATA ports aren't unusual.
I second the notion. Enthusiast level is defined as not being budget minded. If I'm going to be spending $200+ to get entry into the low end (notice, I did not say budget) there had better be a compelling reason beyond more PCI-e and SATA. I could purchase two sets of processors and mother boards for the kind of pricing one socket 2011 will get me. Extra SATA is a good first step, but using a chipset to its fullest (~90% initially with improvements down the road) is something I demand from this pricing.
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#10
yogurt_21
dunno what's with the color hate, because performance and reliability are so dependant on pcb color :rolleyes:

all of the most relaible asus boards I've had are this color.
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#11
Jizzler
Nice. My first dualie featured a yellow Asus 440LX board. Along the nostalgic color, I'm liking it for it's purity (PCIe, no PATA, PS/2).
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