Monday, May 11th 2015

Deltatronic Teases First Passively Cooled Haswell-E Workstation

German server/workstation builder Deltatronic unveiled an otherwise impossible-sounding feat - a workstation that's completely fanless, and running Intel's Core i7 "Haswell-E" or Xeon E5-1xxx/2xxx "Haswell-EP" processors (up to 160W TDP), and NVIDIA GeForce GTX 980 or Quadro K4200 "Maxwell" graphics, completely fanless. The system runs on what the company calls a "heavy-duty convector cooler," which involves solid copper blocks over the CPU/GPU, from which nickel-plated copper heat pipes transfer heat onto a large aluminium panel with grooves, making it the system's heatsink. CPU options include the entire Core "Haswell-E" family, and Xeon E5 "Haswell-EP" family (including 160W TDP models), and GPU options include the entire GeForce "Maxwell" discrete GPU family. The cheapest option, with a Core i7-5820K and GeForce 210 graphics, starts at 1,990€.
Source: FanlessTech
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19 Comments on Deltatronic Teases First Passively Cooled Haswell-E Workstation

#1
diP

Uhhh...
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#2
LDNL
I'd like to see how long the components last with this setup. Cutting that heatsink for the power phases and then running the heat of the cpu through those heatpipes will cause overheating. Then there graphics card that doesnt have any heatsink on the ram or the power phases.
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#3
Caring1
Optical illusion, fooled a couple already I see.
The heatsink over the VRM's isn't cut, the pipes pass over them.
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#4
Frick
Fishfaced Nincompoop
Nice! I have to remember to check it out when it's out.
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#5
LDNL
Caring1
Optical illusion, fooled a couple already I see.
The heatsink over the VRM's isn't cut, the pipes pass over them.
You need to get your eyes fixed. Clearly the first picture already shows thats its been cut down the middle but if you dont belive me have a look at the 4th picture on Guru3D
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#6
lZKoce
I don't know about this man. I am all for 0 dB PC, but a workstation....it gets around 35-40 degrees where I live in the summer. Dunno if its gonna keep up, unless there's some pretty good AC where this PC is operating.
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#7
micropage7
beside it, i wanna know how far the processor could get pushed with configuration like that and its just 2 heat pipes?
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#8
LDNL
micropage7
beside it, i wanna know how far the processor could get pushed with configuration like that and its just 2 heat pipes?
I can tell you from experience that even on stock clock speeds its gonna get hot. Those pipes then transfer that heat through the cpu vrm that has only partial cooling now. Its gonna underclock to keep the vrm from melting.
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#9
buildzoid
LDNL
I can tell you from experience that even on stock clock speeds its gonna get hot. Those pipes then transfer that heat through the cpu vrm that has only partial cooling now. Its gonna underclock to keep the vrm from melting.
Haswell-e VRMs run really cool at stock there is no reason for them to overheat even if they didn't have a heatsink at all since they need to only push as much current as the LGA 1155 VRMs for 95W sandy bridge and some of those boards didn't have heatsinks at all.
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#10
TheDeeGee
Caring1
Optical illusion, fooled a couple already I see.
The heatsink over the VRM's isn't cut, the pipes pass over them.
Just woke up or something?

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#11
Caring1
See, told ya it was an optical illusion :nutkick:
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#12
Casecutter
While what does having that heat-pipe from the CPU running to that backing plate of the VGA really doing for you?

The problem I've known in the past with such ridged set-up's is heat cycling can cause the thermal compounds interface to constantly see a disruption and over the long term loss of conductivity, while things like fatigue around PCB's junctions and loosen of interconnects.
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#13
Nordic
This is pretty cool. I think it is awesome when the case itself is used as a heatsink. Cooling both the gpu and cpu might be really hard though.
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#14
Hitman_Actual
This is a complete fantasy. lets see, no VRM cooling for the GPU/CPU. The CPU's VRM's heat sink is cut in the middle for that passive heat tube... Sorry guys, we're not there yet. Until we see smaller Die sizes and lower TDP's this isn't happening.
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#15
bubbleawsome
I could see that cooling the CPU, but I'd be a bit worried about the GPU.
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#16
Ruyki
It may work. There are motherboards that are sold without VRM heatsinks. Also, what if they cut off only the fins and left the heatsink base intact? The picture isn't quite clear, but if that's the case, the remaining fin section should be enough to cool the VRM.
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#17
Shtb
And videocard's VRM will burn in 3... 2... 1... FLARE!
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#18
LDNL
Ruyki
It may work. There are motherboards that are sold without VRM heatsinks. Also, what if they cut off only the fins and left the heatsink base intact? The picture isn't quite clear, but if that's the case, the remaining fin section should be enough to cool the VRM.
It wont and there are no X99 mobos without vrm heatsinks. Yes there are lower tier mobos that dont but you cant put a +100W prosessor in them. Even if just the fins have been cut those heatpipes running over the vrm will transfer all the CPU heat which is over 100W through 2 small heatpipes and thats more heat than the vrm can handle. Ever touched the heatpipes on a graphics card under full load? The heatsink/fins might be abit warm but those pipes get pretty hot and there are usually more than just 2 pipes for that reason.
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#19
tnn500aff
I can't help but to draw the similarities to ZALMAN's TNN500AF case, probably one of the best cases ever made.
Very eager to see what this new case will look and perform like.
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