Monday, November 16th 2015

Scythe Releases Fuma Twin-Tower CPU Cooler

Japanese cooling expert Scythe announces the availability of it's new Fuma Twin-Tower CPU-Cooler. The new model combines a compact Twin-Tower design with total height of mere 149 millimeters and impressive cooling performance. The compact tower-design allows the Scythe Fuma to easily fit into most on-market PC chassis, making it a great choice for both enthusiast and gaming systems. Fuma is supplied with two Scythe Slip Stream 120-mm PWM fans and another fan clip set for a third fan.

Scythe Engineers successfully created a compact but powerful Twin-Tower heatsink with a total height of 149 millimetres. The new Fuma utilizes 6 high-quality-copper-heatpipes with 6-millimeter diameter. Scythe has soldered the heatpipes to the solid copper-baseplate and the small cooler-block, to increase contact area and maximize the heat-transfer. Both copper-heatpipes and copper-base-plate have been nickel-plated in a final step.
In order to offer great performance at low noise levels, two Slip Stream 120 mm fans with PWM-support are delivered with Scythe Fuma. The fans are offering a really wide fan speed range from 300 up to 1.400 RPM. Thanks to this wide range, a system using Fuma Twin-Tower CPU Cooler can be tuned to operate really silent or to boost the performance to the maximum, whenever it is required. Users are able to mount a third fan using the supplied third fan clip set, making the Fuma an amazingly versatile CPU cooler. In spite of being a Twin-Tower heatsink attached with two fans, Scythe Fuma is reaching a total weight of only 920 Grams.

New Fuma utilizes the approved back-plate based Hyper Precision Mounting System (H.P.M.S) for firm mounting and easy installation process. The socket compatibility list features AM2, AM2+, AM3, AM3+, FM1, FM2 and FM2+ from AMD as well as sockets LGA775, LGA1150, LGA1151, LGA1155, LGA1156, LGA1366, LGA2011 and 2011(-v3) from Intel. Scythe supplies the Fuma with all required mounting clips, one wrench, three sets of fan clips, one Y-fan-adapter as well as thermal grease and a manual.

Scythe Fuma (Model No. SCFM-1000) CPU Cooler is available as of today. Suggested retail price is set at 39,00 EUR (excl. Taxes).
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18 Comments on Scythe Releases Fuma Twin-Tower CPU Cooler

#1
natr0n
Looks nice.

I'm using deepcools assassin which this looks to be based/inspired off of.

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#2
TheDeeGee
Pretty sure everyone based these coolers of the Noctua NH-D14.
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#3
bonehead123
looks alot like 2x Hyper 212 evo's sandwiched together onto 1 mounting plate, or the 612 as is, or am I missing something here ?

anyone know who was 1st to market this design and/or who copied who ?

just curious :D
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#4
buildzoid
The 149mm height is a nice feature. All the other twin towers are 150mm+
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#5
silentbogo
That's 100% Noctua NH-D14 clone. And to be honest I doubt that the third fan will make any difference in everyday use.
That D14 was my first HSF over $50 and I made a few tests with 1 fan in both positions and 2 fans installed: only 1-2°C difference for a Core i7-920 clocked at 4GHz.
3 fans is not just an overkill, it will also make your system louder (even at low RPM).
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#6
HumanSmoke
TheDeeGee, post: 3372496, member: 108032"
Pretty sure everyone based these coolers of the Noctua NH-D14.
The actual layout - the split cooling fin array - actually pre-dates Noctua by a couple of years. Thermalright's Inferno IFX-14 I believe was the template for these cookie-cutter dual stacks, back in late 2007.
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#7
rooivalk
bonehead123, post: 3372505, member: 139670"
looks alot like 2x Hyper 212 evo's sandwiched together onto 1 mounting plate, or the 612 as is, or am I missing something here ?

anyone know who was 1st to market this design and/or who copied who ?

just curious :D
IIRC the trend of big dual towers started with Thermalright IFX-14 (2007). Noctua NH D14 is from 2009.

But the dual towers design is nothing new. Scythe Mine and Tuniq Tower 120 arrived in 2006 but not as big as IFX/D14 and only support single middle fan (although IFX/D14 are basically Mine/Tuniq design with 2 more fans attached via metal wires).

Scythe Mine 2 in 2011 is more bulkier and looking more like D14.
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#8
silentbogo
Good catch, guys. In '06-'07 I still thought that Big Typhoon was the shit :laugh:
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#9
natr0n
silentbogo, post: 3372590, member: 141875"
Good catch, guys. In '06-'07 I still thought that Big Typhoon was the shit :laugh:
That cooler sold for so long.

They still sell a variant.
BigTyp Revo
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#10
[502]
HumanSmoke, post: 3372586, member: 98425"
The actual layout - the split cooling fin array - actually pre-dates Noctua by a couple of years. Thermalright's Inferno IFX-14 I believe was the template for these cookie-cutter dual stacks, back in late 2007.

I've had one back in the day (2008 I think). It was a beast, but I hate the back-side cooler.
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#11
HumanSmoke
[502
, post: 3372629, member: 128414"]I've had one back in the day (2008 I think). It was a beast, but I hate the back-side cooler.
Most people I knew that had the IFX-14 /IFX-11 setup tended to ditch the backside cooling. Very problematic for clearances and airflow. It was a bit of a fad in 2007. Thermalright also tried (unsuccessfully) to get people interested in their GPU version (HR-11)
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#12
silentbogo
HumanSmoke, post: 3372635, member: 98425"
Most people I knew that had the IFX-14 /IFX-11 setup tended to ditch the backside cooling. Very problematic for clearances and airflow. It was a bit of a fad in 2007. Thermalright also tried (unsuccessfully) to get people interested in their GPU version (HR-11)
I actually have something similar in my recent pile of random heatsinks. I was wondering what was it for... Looks exactly like the backside of HR-11, but has copper plates/pipes and is meant to be fully passive (but did not fit on a GT730).
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#13
vega22
mines still does a pretty great job on a 2500k :)

that back cooler would knock a few more deg off the socket too. i hacked a hole into the roof of my cm690 so it would fit xD
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#14
RealNeil
This is pretty big. (Too Big)

I have a Scythe CPU Cooler here that I never used. (MugenMax)
I saw this post and went looking for it. Maybe I'll use it with the FX-6300 I'm planning.
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#15
micropage7
natr0n, post: 3372469, member: 102496"
Looks nice.

I'm using deepcools assassin which this looks to be based/inspired off of.


ha ha ha... i use the same cooler too, but i run it passively
twin tower is good for cooling but at some point you hard to stand on their weight
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#16
ypsylon
Totally amazed that there is still market for such humongous coolers. Don't get me wrong. I used them myself, but that was ages ago - including that monstrous Thermalright full cooper model. Now even simplest AIO is better deal not to mention simple custom loop.

Clunky & sharp motherboard breakers - that's my point of view right now. :)
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#17
cdawall
where the hell are my stars
ypsylon, post: 3375004, member: 101033"
Totally amazed that there is still market for such humongous coolers. Don't get me wrong. I used them myself, but that was ages ago - including that monstrous Thermalright full cooper model. Now even simplest AIO is better deal not to mention simple custom loop.

Clunky & sharp motherboard breakers - that's my point of view right now. :)
No joke, almost every single PC I have has some sort of AIO cooler in it. Everything from the Athlon X3 build I did for my mother-in-law to my own personal.
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#18
revin
Wow this is looking to be priced really well and a pretty good cooler:toast:



160W @ 49db



160W @ 40db

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