Wednesday, February 3rd 2016

Lian Li Announces the PC-M25 Chassis with a Plethora of Drive Mounts

Lian-Li Industrial Co. Ltd announces the PC-M25 chassis. This small form factor (SFF) chassis offers ample storage options and a hot-swap HDD cage for advanced storage applications.

The PC-M25 includes a hot-swap HDD rack where users can conveniently install and remove up to five 3.5" drives with rubber suspension and without needing tools. The bottom HDD tray can mount an additional three 2.5" or two 3.5" drives. This makes a total of as many as seven 3.5" hard drives for advanced RAID storage applications.
The PC-M25 has space enough to fit mammoth VGA cards up to 410mm in length and ATX PSUs up to 230mm long. Unlike its little brother the PC-Q25, it can be installed with Mini-ITX as well as microATX motherboards, with four expansion slots for more elaborate builds. Users can install CPU coolers up to 80mm in height.

The PC-M25 employs a simple cooling design while maintaining great performance. Using a high-airflow, low-RPM 140mm fan, it intakes fresh air through two vents on both side panels, through the HDD cage, and exhausts through a 120mm fan at the back of the top panel. A removable dust filter is positioned on the bottom of the case under the removable HDD tray.

Lian Li is famed for its quality of construction and minimal design, exemplified by the PC-M25. Everything from the power button to the case stands are cut from quality aluminum; it's a solid, lightweight chassis weighing only 8.24 pounds.

The PC-M25 will be available in mid-February for $169.

For more information, visit the product page.
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13 Comments on Lian Li Announces the PC-M25 Chassis with a Plethora of Drive Mounts

#1
P4-630
The Way It's Meant to be Played
Lian Li, aluminium quality design, I like it.
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#3
alucasa
While I like aluminum cases in general, Lian Li hasn't moved forward for some years now. They've been mostly making small modifications to existing cases and have been renaming them.
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#4
Disparia
Nice, an mATX version of my Q25.
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#5
Hood
Firedrops said:
RIP, airflow
Yes, it's a disappointing trend, this compulsion by case designers to reduce front air intake to small slits, all in the name of aesthetics (and possibly noise reduction). A glaring example of this trend is my Corsair 750D - the front panel is solid, and with a lit cigarette and flashlight, I can't see it pulling ANY air in (except maybe a little at the bottom - it has 2 x 140mm/1000RPM fans in front! Airflow was so bad, Corsair released a "High Airflow" version, and also a $15 kit to retrofit the mesh front cover on original 750D cases.
This makes more sense for a high-end system. Many owners removed the front cover altogether, or drilled hundreds of holes in it, before Corsair released this kit.
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#6
jmcslob
The only reason I read about this case is because of the use of the word "plethora" in the title.
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#7
Joss
Am I seeing right, the PSU is placed in front of the motherboard?
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#8
Ciric
I don't really se the point in this case.
Most of the features makes me think, ok this could work for af small file server, which have to be placed somewhere visable, so we give it a nice clean design.
...then they go on talking about room for a long gfx o_O
There is nowhere a long card can breathe in that case, and with placement of the PSU, you will have to do with a lowprofile cpu cooler. IE if you want to use for a small gamer, you will end up with something sounding like a jet fighter taking off.
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#9
Sasqui
Hood said:
Yes, it's a disappointing trend, this compulsion by case designers to reduce front air intake to small slits, all in the name of aesthetics (and possibly noise reduction). A glaring example of this trend is my Corsair 750D - the front panel is solid, and with a lit cigarette and flashlight, I can't see it pulling ANY air in (except maybe a little at the bottom - it has 2 x 140mm/1000RPM fans in front! Airflow was so bad, Corsair released a "High Airflow" version, and also a $15 kit to retrofit the mesh front cover on original 750D cases.
This makes more sense for a high-end system. Many owners removed the front cover altogether, or drilled hundreds of holes in it, before Corsair released this kit.
First encounter with Lian Li was a friends build. Great looking case but he had to leave the side cover off so it wouldn't overheat!

The only attraction is the hot-swap HDD back plane. Why can't more cases do that? In the meantime, I just bought one of these: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00B9NE5LC/?tag=tec06d-20
[SIZE=4]Blue iStarUSA 2x5.25in to 3x3.5in SAS / SATA Trayless Hot-Swap Cage[/SIZE]

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#10
xvi
That backplane is nice. I was wondering why cases don't offer something like that and here we are. In typical LianLi fashion, the price puts it outside of what I'd want to pay for a case.
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#11
dj-electric
Can we stop using 6 year old GPUs in new case photos? that'd be great.
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#12
micropage7
personally i like the less plastic case and simple design is great
but lian li ned to improve something, not much. they have the base
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#13
newtekie1
Semi-Retired Folder
I wish Lian-Li would start making the parts inside the case black instead of leaving them silver. I know the case doesn't have a window, so it won't matter much, but it just make the case feel like it is 10 years old.
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