Thursday, March 10th 2016

Shuttle Announces High-Performance Mini-PC with Room for High-End Graphics

Up to now mini-PCs have been designed in classic cube format for three drives, normally two hard disks/SSDs and an optical drive. A new type of case is being launched today that breaks through these restrictions. The SZ170R8 in R8 case design accommodates four 3.5" drives and does away with the need for an optical drive bay. This structural modification also enables larger graphics cards to be installed. More free space has been created inside the aluminium case. This has also resulted in benefits in terms of easier installation, better cooling and increased compatibility with very large graphics cards.

With four possible hard disks in the SZ170R8, reliable cooling of the machine is of course vital. The heatpipe-based cooling system has therefore been expanded to include a second fan fitted to the front of the case. This device sucks in fresh air through a large opening in the front panel and directs it over all four hard disks, thus preventing a build-up of heat. Another feature of the R8 design, which immediately catches the eye, is the increased number of significantly larger vents on either side of the machine. This change is a response to the more demanding requirements of modern graphics cards. Dual-slot cards with large heatsinks and powerful fans now receive more fresh air and work more reliably and quietly.

Despite all the modifications, the external dimensions of the new model have remained the same, measuring 33.2 x 21.6 x 19.8 cm (DWH). The installation of graphics/expansion cards in the two PCI-Express slots is made easier thanks to a detachable locking device on the rear opening. The SZ170R8 features 1x PCI-Express-x16-3.0, 1x PCI-Express-x4-3.0, 1x M.2-2280 (PCIe, SATA, NVMe) and 1x Mini-PCI-Express-x1-2.0 (half size).

The mainboard developed and pre-installed by Shuttle is equipped with an Intel Z170 chipset and supports 6th generation Intel Core processors (TDP max. 95 W). It accommodates 4x DDR4 memory slots up to a total of 64 GB and has an M.2 slot e.g. for PCIe-SSDs. Further features include 2x DisplayPort, HDMI, 4x SATA 6 Gbit/s with RAID, eSATA, 8x USB 3.0, 7.1 audio and Intel Gigabit Ethernet.

The power supply comes from a 500W, 80-PLUS-certified power unit, which constantly provides the SZ170R8 with sufficient energy to meet the requirements of a fully-equipped machine. "As a compact barebone, this little powerhouse is unique on the market," says Tom Seiffert, Head of Marketing & PR at Shuttle Computer Handels GmbH. "In particular, demanding users and those looking for a custom solution for out-of-the-ordinary applications will find the new R8 design attractive."

Optional accessories include a 2.5" HDD/SSD installation frame (PHD3), COM port (H-RS232) as well as WLN-C and WLN-M WLAN modules.

Shuttle's recommended retail price for the XPC Barebone SZ170R8 is EUR 322.00 (ex VAT). At the time of publication of this press release the specified model was available from retailers.

For more information, visit the shuttle.eu/products/mini-pc/sz170r8/]product page.
Add your own comment

14 Comments on Shuttle Announces High-Performance Mini-PC with Room for High-End Graphics

#1
Ubersonic
Would have been nicer to finally see an X99 unit to replace the X79 one :(
Posted on Reply
#2
Caring1
Shuttle designs haven't changed much at all, and they are still overpriced.
Demanding users would rather a case they can fit components of their choice, not proprietary PSU's etc.
Posted on Reply
#3
R-T-B
Caring1 said:
Shuttle designs haven't changed much at all, and they are still overpriced.
Yeah, they were cool when ATX was the smallesst form factor you could get... now we have all sorts of standard form factors that are small, rendering shuttle obsolete IMO.
Posted on Reply
#5
Solaris17
Creator Solaris Utility DVD
Ferrum Master said:
CMOS button xD :laugh:
Really? As someone who remembers over clocking before software was a thing the cmos buttons are like a god send. I remember CMOS battery placement. Always needed to be in the most inconvenient place. Directly near something you couldnt get to once the machine was fully assembled. Everyone here can look at the exact spot on there hand they got a cut or pinch when they tried unsuccessfully to remove the cmos battery under GPU 1. I know you guys remember.
Posted on Reply
#6
Frick
Fishfaced Nincompoop
Solaris17 said:
Really? As someone who remembers over clocking before software was a thing the cmos buttons are like a god send. I remember CMOS battery placement. Always needed to be in the most inconvenient place. Directly near something you couldnt get to once the machine was fully assembled. Everyone here can look at the exact spot on there hand they got a cut or pinch when they tried unsuccessfully to remove the cmos battery under GPU 1. I know you guys remember.
Yeah, but here it's a bit unneccesary.
Posted on Reply
#7
ERazer
product link page broken @btarunr
Posted on Reply
#8
Solaris17
Creator Solaris Utility DVD
Frick said:
Yeah, but here it's a bit unneccesary.
I couldnt think of a harder case to pull a CMOS battery on than a small form factor shuttle.
Posted on Reply
#9
Ferrum Master
It the button is just hilarious... this thing should not be meant for OC or something, when you actually might need the button. It is like inviting to problems that may be casual thing... :D

I might imagine myself trolling around when I see this thing and reseting CMOS out of fun :D
Posted on Reply
#10
Caring1
ERazer said:
product link page broken @btarunr
Works in FF.
Posted on Reply
#11
crazyeyesreaper
Chief Broken Rig
Anyone else think it looks like the CM elite series. i mean yeah the PSU setup is different but front sides etc look a rebadged CM elite 110.
Posted on Reply
#12
alucasa
Nowadays, "Mini PC" is pretty much NUC size machines. That's no mini PC. I did own two of those shuttle PCs ages ago but these days I can build similar machines with SFF cases.

Some of their other products are still okay but their enthusiast products are ... meh these days.

P.S. Unless they changed it, their PSU is not proprietary. It's flex PSU. They used to use good PSUs.
Posted on Reply
#13
ZeppMan217
The link at the end of the article is broken when you try to open it from the site announcement instead of the forum.
Posted on Reply
#14
Fx
R-T-B said:
Yeah, they were cool when ATX was the smallesst form factor you could get... now we have all sorts of standard form factors that are small, rendering shuttle obsolete IMO.
Agreed. We now have 5x5 mini-STX that was recently finalized which also provides a custom choice of components in an even smaller form factor. Shuttle's over-priced glory is quickly becoming a thing of the past especially with NUCs being around for awhile now.
Posted on Reply
Add your own comment