Monday, August 17th 2015

GlobalFoundries to Skip 10 nm and Jump Straight to 7 nm

Silicon fabrication company GlobalFoundries is reportedly planning to skip development of the 10 nanometer (nm) process, and is aiming to jump straight to 7 nm. The company currently operates a 14 nm FinFET node. In 2015 the company acquired semiconductor manufacturing assets from IBM, and is using them to fast-track its development. When it's ready, the 7 nm node will offer both optical and EUV (extreme ultra-violet) lithography. Driving the EUV product is an IBM 3300 EUV fabricator at the company's advanced patterning center, in its Albany, New York fab.
Source: SemiWiki
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16 Comments on GlobalFoundries to Skip 10 nm and Jump Straight to 7 nm

#1
yogurt_21
"we're going to skip something really hard to do something even harder"
WAT?
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#2
Steevo
yogurt_21 said:
"we're going to skip something really hard to do something even harder"
WAT?
Plus their track record....... maybe 10nm wasn't really worth it, but maybe, just maybe, they couldn't figure it out, but the pieces fell into place with the IBM acquisition for 7nm to work.
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#3
Xajel
The question is when it will be ready, and I think Glofo should work on licensing ARM and Custom ARM cores manufacturing so they can do Mobile SoC which is becoming a huge success for foundries these days and future duo to rise in mobile and IoT.
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#4
Killer_Rubber_Ducky
they are trying to keep up and surpass Intel. IBM gave them the stuff to do 7nm since IBM was the first one to do 7nm.
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#5
ppn
14nm doesn't even double the transistor density of 28nm. for each next shrink to make sense it should at least be 1.25x.
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#6
theoneandonlymrk
Steevo said:
Plus their track record....... maybe 10nm wasn't really worth it, but maybe, just maybe, they couldn't figure it out, but the pieces fell into place with the IBM acquisition for 7nm to work.
With this being GF does 7nm Really mean 7nm
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#7
jabbadap
So Samsung did not give them 10nm process or what?
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#8
TheGuruStud
theoneandonlymrk said:
With this being GF does 7nm Really mean 7nm
Can't be any worse than intel :roll:
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#9
$ReaPeR$
this isn't a "true" 7nm fab process, is it?
Posted on Reply
#10
$ReaPeR$
TheGuruStud said:
Can't be any worse than intel :roll:
it's all a marketing plot..
Posted on Reply
#11
hellrazor
I wonder how this will affect AMD if they continue to work with each other.
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#12
zzzaac
hellrazor said:
I wonder how this will affect AMD if they continue to work with each other.
Probably they will stay on 14nm for a bit longer
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#13
RejZoR
They should first master 14nm before talking anything else...
Posted on Reply
#14
Totally
yogurt_21 said:
"we're going to skip something really hard to do something even harder"
WAT?
They probably noticed it a was a neglible amount additional of effort/risk to get 7nm instead in which case it would would be the common sense choice.
Posted on Reply
#15
Prima.Vera
With 7nm, I think is very possible to see CPUs with 100 billion transistors....
A.I. might just became a reality :)
Posted on Reply
#16
D007
I like it.. But is this a better way to make money for a company?
Not so sure..
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