Wednesday, November 16th 2016

Crucial's Ballistix is Now its Own Brand of PC Gaming Hardware

The Ballistix sub-brand of Crucial, Micron Technology's consumer products subsidiary, is now its own brand, and no longer labeled next to Crucial. The Ballistix Gaming brand will now include PC gaming hardware, including memory (RAM), and perhaps even SSDs and gaming peripherals in the future. Ballistix products will be targeted at DIY gaming PC builders and enthusiasts.

Commenting on the story, Crucial stated: "Ballistix is now it's own defined brand, becoming a sibling to Crucial (previously a sub-brand). For more than a decade, Ballistix has injected speed and style into PC gaming in a way that can't be imitated. As the only major brand of gaming memory that builds and tests products from start to finish, Ballistix brings you the proven performance and reliability that pro gamers build with. Ballistix performance memory (RAM) is designed to give the upper hand to gamers, performance enthusiasts, and overclockers."
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14 Comments on Crucial's Ballistix is Now its Own Brand of PC Gaming Hardware

#1
RejZoR
So, in a similar way as HyperX from Kingston.
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#2
Ubersonic
Hope they are still manufactured/designed by Crucial and that this is just an in name only thing.

When Squire became a separate brand from Fender the quality dropped noticeably...
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#3
RejZoR
Ballistix brand was always considered premium. Making it worse than generic Crucial would be a bit stupid, don't you think? Plus, with it, they are entering competition with their premium products, meaning they will most likely actually improve and not downgrade.
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#4
Ubersonic
RejZoR said:
Ballistix brand was always considered premium. Making it worse than generic Crucial would be a bit stupid, don't you think?
Yeah but it's not like something being stupid has really ever stopped companies from doing it. I.E Dell XPS laptops were the best performance laptops you could get but now they are the midrange model and focus on portability. I'm just worried that Ballistix will go downhill once divorced form Crucial.
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#5
Ungari
If Ballistix is the "Gaming" brand, I would think that means the performance would be higher than standard, and unfortunately maybe the pricing.

I currently use Crucial Ballistix memory, so I'll be interested in seeing what happens here.
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#7
ty_ger
RejZoR said:
So, in a similar way as HyperX from Kingston.
Not so similar since Kingston doesn't actually make memory in the first place. For Kingston, it started as a rebrand of someone else's product which then split off into a different brand. (rebrand of a rebrand)

At least Crucial actually makes their memory under their Micron parent company.
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#8
ZoneDymo
I really hope they are going to make original products.
I really expect its just going to be same priced rebranded bs.
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#9
natr0n
Who remembers what started it all ?

2-2-2-5/2-2-2-11 on nforce2 boards. Those were the days.
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#10
ty_ger
natr0n said:
Who remembers what started it all ?

2-2-2-5/2-2-2-11 on nforce2 boards. Those were the days.
NVIDIA nForce motherboards were total garbage in the long run. I am glad those days are past. Sure they started out fine, but in the end, everyone knew that it was time to move on. Hot, inefficient, and unreliable.
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#11
Scrizz
ty_ger said:
NVIDIA nForce motherboards were total garbage in the long run. I am glad those days are past. Sure they started out fine, but in the end, everyone knew that it was time to move on. Hot, inefficient, and unreliable.
yes.

I'm glad nForce is out of the pic, but I do miss those days lol
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#12
Ubersonic
ty_ger said:
NVIDIA nForce motherboards were total garbage in the long run. I am glad those days are past. Sure they started out fine, but in the end, everyone knew that it was time to move on. Hot, inefficient, and unreliable.
In fairness, all motherboards in those days were night and day inferior to what followed (well, excluding EVGA's X79 SLi lol) but they weren't all bad eggs, I still have an Nforce 750i chugging away in an old rig with a Q9650 lol. In the long run It's a shame Nvidia gave up on boards and let Intel form a monopoly.
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#13
Frick
Fishfaced Nincompoop
Ubersonic said:
In fairness, all motherboards in those days were night and day inferior to what followed (well, excluding EVGA's X79 SLi lol) but they weren't all bad eggs, I still have an Nforce 750i chugging away in an old rig with a Q9650 lol. In the long run It's a shame Nvidia gave up on boards and let Intel form a monopoly.
Seeing as how more and more things are interated into the CPU itself it would be a dead race in any case.
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#14
eidairaman1
The Exiled Airman
ty_ger said:
NVIDIA nForce motherboards were total garbage in the long run. I am glad those days are past. Sure they started out fine, but in the end, everyone knew that it was time to move on. Hot, inefficient, and unreliable.
So what chipset performed better than that for Socket A/462? I have 2 boards running fine to this day, a MSI and a DFI with NF2 Ultra.

I could say Pentium 4 chipsets were Hot, Inefficient and unreliable aswell, just like the core 2 chipsets being Hot and inefficient compared to core i series. +1m+
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