Monday, November 21st 2016

Intel's Skylake-EP Flagship Xeon E5-2699 V5 CPU to Harness 32 Cores, 64 Threads

Intel is preparing their Skylake-EP Xeon E5 processor lineup for launch in mid-2017. And judging by the leaks regarding their next top-of-the-line processors in the server market, the Xeon E5-2699 V5 looks like Intel's response to AMD's expected Naples server platform. The leak should, naturally, be taken with a grain of salt, since the leaked chip appears to not yet be a finalized version of Intel's silicon. If you trust the source, you can secure one of these engineering samples for the tidy sum of ¥ 26500 (around $3845).
The chip that has just leaked is a trend-breaker when it comes to Intel's server parts: it carries on the V5 platforms' core count increase (with 24 and 28-core processors being already expected), stepping away from the 22-core high-end E5-2699V4A that Intel recently announced, by injecting ten extra full cores (and thus, 20 extra threads) to Intel's server chip line-up. If you find that number familiar, it's probably because AMD's Naples platform is also expected to house up to 32 processor cores per processor, alongside AMD's implementation of SMT (Simultaneous Multi Threading) for a total of 64 logical threads. Part of the Skylake-EP lineup which launches next year, the Xeon E5-2699 V5 (ES) is designed for Intel's LGA 3647 socket, and the leaked sample features a base clock of 2.10 GHz.

The Intel Xeon V5 line-up will be going up against AMD's Zen based Naples platform next year. While Intel enjoys a staggering, overwhelming presence in the server market, AMD is counting on Zen's performance and core counts as being a renaissance of sorts for the company, allowing it to claw back market share in this highly-lucrative market. Intel seems to be making an effort to at least equalizing its offers in regards to Naples' expected core counts, in a bid to ensure it is able to maintain its tight grip on the lion's share of the server market.Source: Taobao[/URL]
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54 Comments on Intel's Skylake-EP Flagship Xeon E5-2699 V5 CPU to Harness 32 Cores, 64 Threads

#1
ZeDestructor
ratirt said:
For AMD locking OC possibility is unlikely. Remember that AMD has always had a good OC and changing that would not help. Note that AMD is trying to regain some of the market and that's few areas not only server market. They would leave the OC open to customers. My opinion only but that's what I would think they will do.
So did Intel for the most part until they locked it down with Nehalem/Lynnfield. Personally, I'm thinking that now is about the right time for AMD to lock it down, because the market won't really bat an eye at the change. Sure, the forums will whine about it for a few days, but then it'll all calm down and all will be good. Besides, forum users like us don't make much of the market...
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#2
ratirt
Maybe not make as much of the market but believe me. Some users would rather buy a overclocable CPU just in case. Even they will not OC it they would prefer to get the OC possible CPU so that if there's a need for more IPC they can get it without purchasing new CPU. IT gives the peace of mind that when needed is there. Reassurance of more power when the need comes. I know a lot people that bought Intel's "K" CPU even they have never OC'ed anything and they stated they don't know how. But it's there and they can always catch up with OC.
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#3
ZeDestructor
ratirt said:
Maybe not make as much of the market but believe me. Some users would rather buy a overclocable CPU just in case. Even they will not OC it they would prefer to get the OC possible CPU so that if there's a need for more IPC they can get it without purchasing new CPU. IT gives the peace of mind that when needed is there. Reassurance of more power when the need comes. I know a lot people that bought Intel's "K" CPU even they have never OC'ed anything and they stated they don't know how. But it's there and they can always catch up with OC.
Even then, by the numbers, the unlocked market is still tiny compared to the rest of the market. Most people don't even know what overclocking means for the most part, for example. On top of that, you also have stuff like the 6700K being clocked much higher than anything else in the stack, so a lot of people who want the fastest chip but have no intention (or knowledge) of overclocking will buy it, and that further cuts the market down.

Either ways, that's what I expect AMD to do. Whether or not they do is another question that only time will tell.
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#4
ratirt
Time will tell but I still think that AMD will not oc disable ZEN CPU's. also there's another part of OC. If they leave the OC possibility how well will it OC? Although seeing all the previous AMD's CPU's the OC potential is always good :)
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