Friday, June 2nd 2017

Calyos Showcases Its NSG S0 Phase Change Cooling Chassis at Computex 2017

Remember that Kickstarted case from Calyos, which promises to be the ending of spinning fans on your rig? Calyos is showcasing it at this year's Computex.

The production chassis is designed by France's modding duo WaterMod, which improved upon the original open-frame concept design both in terms of performance and aesthetics. The usage of Phase Change cooling through two cooling blocks - one for the GPU, another for the CPU) makes away with fans, pumps, water, and any other assorted cooling techniques that involve calling upon the decibel gods.
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39 Comments on Calyos Showcases Its NSG S0 Phase Change Cooling Chassis at Computex 2017

#1
Aenra
If there's anyone that can educate this redneck on how this works and why, by all means do.
If you have an opinion (based on expertise that is) regarding its actual efficiency, by all means share that as well :)
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#2
mouacyk
Linus actually previewed this a while back, Oct of 2016 with temperature and sound readings:

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#3
PowerPC
This won't be silent, if it's an open case. All kinds of coil whine will especially be audible if your PC is close to you. I really just want to put this thing into a beQuiet case and have a completely silent, no-maintenance PC... But it probably would become too hot in a closed case...
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#4
Aenra
Thank you my friend, but i wouldn't trust Linus to tell me where the sun rises from :)

Hence my saying someone knowledgeable. Like facts and physics and stuff.
(my thinking is that this cannot possibly be as good as they're hyping it to be, but i may be mistaken, hence my enquiring).
Posted on Reply
#5
DarkHill
Aenra said:
Thank you my friend, but i wouldn't trust Linus to tell me where the sun rises from :)

Hence my saying someone knowledgeable. Like facts and physics and stuff.
(my thinking is that this cannot possibly be as good as they're hyping it to be, but i may be mistaken, hence my enquiring).
wether or not you like linus is not really relevant. Its phasechange cooling. Its not new - just the way its implemented here that is new.

And again, both noise and temp readings are relevant no matter who states them - as long as the method is transparent.
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#6
PowerPC
At some point the PC parts should be in a closed case, preferably even a sound dampening one. Then I will practically throw my money at it.
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#7
DarkHill
PowerPC said:
At some point this should be in a closed case, preferably even a sound dampening one. Then I will practically throw my money at it.
Heat needs to be dissapated - that cannot change.

You can move the heat somewhere else (phasechange - be it water, ln2 or others like rifigerators).

What is it exactly you want enclosed? the motherboard? In that case, i think its fairly obvious that i will be enclosed when(if) its released to users. But the radiators can obviously not be enclosed.
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#8
Dammeron
Yes, finally something, that will allow me to listen to squeaking VRMs without any obstructions. :)
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#9
Ubersonic
It will be silent at idle but just like with passive water cooling back when that was popular if you want to use a decent CPU/GPU then you will need to fit the optional fans to prevent overheating at load.
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#10
Slizzo
Ubersonic said:
It will be silent at idle but just like with passive water cooling back when that was popular if you want to use a decent CPU/GPU then you will need to fit the optional fans to prevent overheating at load.
With the sheer size of the heatsink, I'm not sure you'll even need the fans in any case. AND, if you really want to blow air over this, just buy a regular standing 16" fan or something, set it to low and point it at the case. Boom, that's all you need to move air over the fin area.
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#11
PowerPC
DarkHill said:
Heat needs to be dissapated - that cannot change.

You can move the heat somewhere else (phasechange - be it water, ln2 or others like rifigerators).

What is it exactly you want enclosed? the motherboard? In that case, i think its fairly obvious that i will be enclosed when(if) its released to users. But the radiators can obviously not be enclosed.
I changed it to PC parts right after because I knew someone will misinterpret it. And what tells you it's "obviously" going to be enclosed when it comes out? There is absolutely no hint to your statement. It may even not work enclosed at this point, and they are probably not gonna wait to release it until they solve this problem.
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#12
Aquinus
Resident Wat-man
DarkHill said:
What is it exactly you want enclosed? the motherboard? In that case, i think its fairly obvious that i will be enclosed when(if) its released to users. But the radiators can obviously not be enclosed.
The same way a refrigerator works. The evaporator is on the inside and the condenser is on the outside. You're pumping heat out to the room from the container using phase change. If you didn't enclose it you're more likely to have issues with things like condensation and efficiency since the temperature inside of the container can be maintained below ambient temperatures.

All in all, it would work the same way that a refrigerator does. Also, since you're pumping heat (doing work to move thermal energy and not letting it flow naturally,) the difference in temperature between the condenser and ambient will be large enough to let convection do a lot of the necessary heat transfer away from the coil to a point.

Edit: It takes work to move heat against its gradient, hence phase change.
Posted on Reply
#13
QinX
Ubersonic said:
It will be silent at idle but just like with passive water cooling back when that was popular if you want to use a decent CPU/GPU then you will need to fit the optional fans to prevent overheating at load.
They claim you can run a 6950x with a 1080 Ti completely passive.
So 99% of configurations could be run passive, and it should with that much heat exchanger for roughly 450W of heat. Overclocking might would be limited.
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#14
citrix13
PowerPC said:
This won't be silent, if it's an open case. All kinds of coil whine will especially be audible if your PC is close to you. I really just want to put this thing into a beQuiet case and have a completely silent, no-maintenance PC... But it probably would become too hot in a closed case...
Take a close look at the pictures, there are no fans. The CPU is fanless and the GPU is fanless. Therefore even though it's an Open case/chassis, it is completely silent.
Posted on Reply
#15
Aenra
DarkHill said:
wether or not you like linus is not really relevant. Its phasechange cooling. Its not new - just the way its implemented here that is new
You need to read more and express your personal opinion less. I didn't ask if it's new, i asked if someone can explain it to me, with numbers and laws if/where appliccable.
Also, it's "whether".

edit: see Aquinus's post for example.
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#16
Ubersonic
Slizzo said:
With the sheer size of the heatsink, I'm not sure you'll even need the fans in any case.
You will if running high end CPU/GPU hence why they have optional fans. It's essentially the same principle as the Zalman reserator passive water coolers, the passive cooling potential is excellent and will be able to cool any beast at idle, but once the radiators reach their limit and the room temperature gets high things will run away unless actively cooled (NB that does include opening windows).
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#17
PowerPC
citrix13 said:
Take a close look at the pictures, there are no fans. The CPU is fanless and the GPU is fanless. Therefore even though it's an Open case/chassis, it is completely silent.
No, it isn't. Ever heard of coil whine...? Or even the noise that the phase changer may create where the hot components meet with it? Btw. the more you make something red to make your point, the more likely it is to be wrong.
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#18
theGryphon
Aenra said:
If there's anyone that can educate this redneck on how this works and why, by all means do.
If you have an opinion (based on expertise that is) regarding its actual efficiency, by all means share that as well :)
DarkHill said:
wether or not you like linus is not really relevant. Its phasechange cooling. Its not new - just the way its implemented here that is new.

And again, both noise and temp readings are relevant no matter who states them - as long as the method is transparent.
More precisely, it's loop heat-pipe technology:

http://www.calyos-tm.com/working-principles/
https://www.qats.com/cms/2014/08/04/understanding-loop-heat-pipes/
http://opac.vimaru.edu.vn/edata/E-Journal/2005/Applied%20thermal%20engineering/v25su5-6.1.pdf
http://www.thermalfluidscentral.org/e-resources/download.php?id=218

Third link is actually a research paper from one of the inventor's (Yury F Maydanik).
Posted on Reply
#19
citrix13
PowerPC said:
No, it isn't. Ever heard of coil whine...? Or even the noise that the phase changer may create where the hot components meet with it? Btw. the more you make something red to make your point, the more likely it is to be wrong.
NSG - S0 is the perfect combination between performance and silence for gamers and regular users.

Taken from their website see here:

http://www.calyos-tm.com/calyos-nsg-s0-fanless-desktop-pc/
Posted on Reply
#20
Prince Valiant
On the noise thing:
Does it really make no noise? NSG S0 is equipped with fanless phase change technology. This means there is no moving parts. Cooling and casing won’t make any noise. But depending on your electronics options, you may hear coil whine or HDD working
Is there any word on pricing or standalone availability of the tower?
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#21
Aenra
Thank you @theGryphon :)
Posted on Reply
#22
PowerPC
citrix13 said:
NSG - S0 is the perfect combination between performance and silence for gamers and regular users.

Taken from their website see here:

http://www.calyos-tm.com/calyos-nsg-s0-fanless-desktop-pc/

Because marketing speak means something... Btw. what I said about red, the same goes for bold.

Also read what Prince Valiant said.
Posted on Reply
#23
Air
Aquinus said:
The same way a refrigerator works. The evaporator is on the inside and the condenser is on the outside. You're pumping heat out to the room from the container using phase change. If you didn't enclose it you're more likely to have issues with things like condensation and efficiency since the temperature inside of the container can be maintained below ambient temperatures.

All in all, it would work the same way that a refrigerator does. Also, since you're pumping heat (doing work to move thermal energy and not letting it flow naturally,) the difference in temperature between the condenser and ambient will be large enough to let convection do a lot of the necessary heat transfer away from the coil to a point.

Edit: It takes work to move heat against its gradient, hence phase change.
A refrigerator works differently. There is no compressor on this thing (thankfully), its not a refrigeration cicle. The flow is not forced.

The case part with the pc parts probably cant be enclosed, or every component other than GPU and CPU will overheat after some time, since they rely on passive cooling.

If you mount some fans on the radiators, it will probably the most powerful water cooled system ever.
Posted on Reply
#24
citrix13
PowerPC said:
Because marketing speak means something... Btw. what I said about red, the same goes for bold.

Also read what Prince Valiant said.
Prince Valiant only proves the point that the Case is Silent. He explaned quite sensibly "Cooling and casing won’t make any noise. But depending on your electronics options, you may hear coil whine or HDD working"

Coil whine does not come from the case, it comes the stuff you put into the case.

Learn to read and comprehend
Posted on Reply
#25
AsRock
TPU addict
Problem is though, is this company they often don't end up releasing them to the market. How ever it is expected to be around $600-700 if it was which to be honest i would have to see to believe.
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