Thursday, September 7th 2017

ZOTAC Announces its ZBOX M-series and P-series Mini PCs

ZOTAC International, a Hong Kong based and a global manufacturer of innovation, today announced two groundbreaking releases from the acclaimed ZBOX M series and P series Mini PCs. More customized to contemporary users' needs, yet equipped with future fast technologies. The ZBOX MI553 has a refreshing all-new minimal and elegant design with future fast technologies permeating all of the Mini PC, while the ZBOX PI225 tops world rankings in being the smallest and thinnest Mini PC ever.

"Both ZBOX MI553 and PI225 inherit the defining features of their predecessors, and perhaps employ the most ambitious designs and features yet in a Mini PC. We want to make sure users can enjoy a simple and fast computing experience," said Chinny Chuang, ZOTAC Global Director of Marketing. Future Fast - The all-new ZBOX MI553 introduces the largest surface-area of ventilation ever that with future fast technologies that brings speeding performance to the forefront. It features a 7th Gen Intel Core processor based on the Kaby Lake architecture, a revolutionary Optane Memory technology, Thunderbolt 3, USB 3.1 Gen2, and the fast lanes to support a NVMe M.2 SSD. Professionally dressed for the office and casually comfortable for the home, the all new ZBOX MI553 is the multi-functional do it all Mini PC.
Mini More Possibilities - The world's smallest and thinnest Mini PC, the ZBOX PI225 is powered by an Intel Apollo Lake dual-core processor combined with a ribbed metal exterior to provide a symphony of silent performance in a world ranking pico size. ZBOX PI225 capitalizes on a completely fan-less design with fast 802.11ac wireless and Bluetooth 4.2 connectivity, two USB 3.0 Type-C ports and Windows 10 pre-installed to create many more possibilities.

Get the speed from ZBOX MI553 or world ranking small size and thinness of the ZBOX PI225.
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11 Comments on ZOTAC Announces its ZBOX M-series and P-series Mini PCs

#1
Rehmanpa
Looks cool, what kind of prices?
Posted on Reply
#2
plåtburken
This is interesting, any word on pricing?
I can see this being popular among people who want something simple at home and eventually add along an eGPU setup.
Posted on Reply
#3
bug
plåtburken said:
This is interesting, any word on pricing?
I can see this being popular among people who want something simple at home and eventually add along an eGPU setup.
There's little reason to buy these, they usually cost the same as a regular PC, with limited upgrade options. But they are cute.
Posted on Reply
#4
plåtburken
bug said:
There's little reason to buy these, they usually cost the same as a regular PC, with limited upgrade options. But they are cute.
True but who knows, if it costs less than expected might be a good purchase.
Posted on Reply
#5
bug
plåtburken said:
True but who knows, if it costs less than expected might be a good purchase.
Oh, I'm pretty sure they're a good purchase for some even at current prices. Just not as widespread as you'd expect it.
Plus, there's always the option of building a mITX system yourself ;)
Posted on Reply
#6
plåtburken
bug said:
Oh, I'm pretty sure they're a good purchase for some even at current prices. Just not as widespread as you'd expect it.
Plus, there's always the option of building a mITX system yourself ;)
Most certainly!
Posted on Reply
#7
silentbogo
Rehmanpa said:
Looks cool, what kind of prices?
plåtburken said:
This is interesting, any word on pricing?
If the trend follows Zotac's previous models, then Pico models should go under $200 (with sticks under $150), Mini in a $200-$300 range depending on configuration.

bug said:
There's little reason to buy these, they usually cost the same as a regular PC, with limited upgrade options. But they are cute.
bug said:
Plus, there's always the option of building a mITX system yourself ;)
Zotac mini PCs are much smaller than whatever is possible to build from aftermarket parts. The more powerful Pico 300-series is about the size of RaspberryPi, while M and even the hi-end Magnus manages to stay in what used to be called a "booksize PC". I used to have a ZBOX ID41 few years back and with an exception of not-so-good NVidia ION2 GPU it was a perfect productivity machine or HTPC. All of that combined with the ability to run Windows 7/8/10 and being half the size and quarter the weight of a single tome of D.Knuth's "The Art of Computer Programming" made it one of my favorites, before I moved on to Cherry Trail.

P.S. I am not affiliated with Zotac, I simply love their ZBOXes :laugh:
Posted on Reply
#8
bug
silentbogo said:

Zotac mini PCs are much smaller than whatever is possible to build from aftermarket parts. The more powerful Pico 300-series is about the size of RaspberryPi, while M and even the hi-end Magnus manages to stay in what used to be called a "booksize PC". I used to have a ZBOX ID41 few years back and with an exception of not-so-good NVidia ION2 GPU it was a perfect productivity machine or HTPC. All of that combined with the ability to run Windows 7/8/10 and being half the size and quarter the weight of a single tome of D.Knuth's "The Art of Computer Programming" made it one of my favorites, before I moved on to Cherry Trail.
Of course they're smaller, but on the other hand you get better upgradeability and you get to pick all components.
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#9
plåtburken
silentbogo said:
If the trend follows Zotac's previous models, then Pico models should go under $200 (with sticks under $150), Mini in a $200-$300 range depending on configuration.
That doesn't sound too bad, the main feature I was looking at is the Thunderbolt connection.
Most devices today with it costs a lot making the eGPU configuration not cheap.
Posted on Reply
#10
TheinsanegamerN
Hopefully at least one of them uses the 28 watt iris chip.

Nobody seems to want to make a iris NUC except intel....
Posted on Reply
#11
EChondo


That case looks familiar...
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