Thursday, January 4th 2018

Intel Issues Updates to Protect Systems From Security Exploits

Intel has developed and is rapidly issuing updates for all types of Intel-based computer systems -- including personal computers and servers -- that render those systems immune from both exploits (referred to as "Spectre" and "Meltdown") reported by Google Project Zero. Intel and its partners have made significant progress in deploying updates as both software patches and firmware updates.

Intel has already issued updates for the majority of processor products introduced within the past five years. By the end of next week, Intel expects to have issued updates for more than 90 percent of processor products introduced within the past five years. In addition, many operating system vendors, public cloud service providers, device manufacturers and others have indicated that they have already updated their products and services.
Intel continues to believe that the performance impact of these updates is highly workload-dependent and, for the average computer user, should not be significant and will be mitigated over time. While on some discrete workloads the performance impact from the software updates may initially be higher, additional post-deployment identification, testing and improvement of the software updates should mitigate that impact.

System updates are made available by system manufacturers, operating system providers and others.

Intel will continue to work with its partners and others to address these issues, and Intel appreciates their support and assistance. Intel encourages computer users worldwide to utilize the automatic update functions of their operating systems and other computer software to ensure their systems are up-to-date.
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18 Comments on Intel Issues Updates to Protect Systems From Security Exploits

#1
figuretti
[MEDIA=twitter]948996493280731139[/MEDIA]
Posted on Reply
#2
Assimilator
The problem I have with this statement is "within the past five years". Since Sandy and Ivy Bridge are older than that, does this mean Intel won't be releasing fixed microcode for those processor families (assuming they are vulnerable)?

If that is the case, terrible decision on Intel's part considering the massive number of people (including myself) still using SNB/IVB rigs. If their plan is to force those owners to upgrade, then congrats Intel, you just gave AMD another customer.
Posted on Reply
#3
Prima.Vera
Are those updates going to slow down the CPUs as well?? Serious question.
Posted on Reply
#4
RejZoR
What kind of update? Driver? Windows update? BIOS update? If it's the first two, which ones, where and when? If BIOS, that means most systems will never get them because it then falls down to motherboard/OEM makers and they generally don't release BIOS updates for anything after 2 years of life of any product go by.
Posted on Reply
#5
biffzinker
RejZoR said:
If BIOS, that means most systems will never get them because it then falls down to motherboard/OEM makers and they generally don't release BIOS updates for anything after 2 years of life of any product go by.
There is the possibility of Microsoft pushing out Intel's required microcode updates through Windows Update similar too Linux. The microcode update gets applied earlier in the boot phase.

It's happened in the past for older Intel Processors running under Windows 7.
Posted on Reply
#6
RejZoR
biffzinker said:
There is the possibility of Microsoft pushing out Intel's required microcode updates through Windows Update similar too Linux. It's happened in the past for older Intel Processors running under Windows 7.
But can they in this case and what do they actually fix? It's a lot of talk what all is vulnerable and that patches are being released yet no one posts a clear cut info on what exactly is flawed and what exactly is being patched, how and when. Coz that's what we want to know.
Posted on Reply
#8
davidm71
biffzinker said:
There is the possibility of Microsoft pushing out Intel's required microcode updates through Windows Update similar too Linux. The microcode update gets applied earlier in the boot phase.

It's happened in the past for older Intel Processors running under Windows 7.
There was a Windows 10 update yesterday that Microsoft pushed through and I can swear my machine now feels a little sluggish and slower as result! The name of this update was the 1709 cumulative update. Details stated it fixed mouse and keyboard issues but it took a few minutes to install so you can bet there was a whole lot more ‘fixes’ in there..
Posted on Reply
#9
champsilva
Assimilator said:
The problem I have with this statement is "within the past five years". Since Sandy and Ivy Bridge are older than that, does this mean Intel won't be releasing fixed microcode for those processor families (assuming they are vulnerable)?

If that is the case, terrible decision on Intel's part considering the massive number of people (including myself) still using SNB/IVB rigs. If their plan is to force those owners to upgrade, then congrats Intel, you just gave AMD another customer.
Honest, i don't even know why people are so "OMG, i'm vunerable", most of people has boring stuff in their laptops anyway haha
Posted on Reply
#10
Assimilator
champsilva said:
Honest, i don't even know why people are so "OMG, i'm vunerable", most of people has boring stuff in their laptops anyway haha
Like their bank details and cryptocurrency wallets?
Posted on Reply
#11
laszlo
i think is not a flaw but a NSA "feature" implemented from the start...

now when all went public all involved exposed parts patch the disclosed issues...

i bet there are more undisclosed implemented vulnerabilities, which are used by agencies for data collection, undetected by anyone...
Posted on Reply
#12
davidm71
Re
laszlo said:
i think is not a flaw but a NSA "feature" implemented from the start...

now when all went public all involved exposed parts patch the disclosed issues...

i bet there are more undisclosed implemented vulnerabilities, which are used by agencies for data collection, undetected by anyone...
I agree. Sounds like a NSA backdoor. Reminds of the Black Mirror Face the Nation episode almost!
Posted on Reply
#13
champsilva
Assimilator said:
Like their bank details and cryptocurrency wallets?
At least here in Brazil, Banks are very secure, and passwords are not even typed, we've to click in random numbers

[MEDIA=imgur]kUe0vNF[/MEDIA]
[MEDIA=imgur]JdDF926[/MEDIA]
Posted on Reply
#14
Frick
Fishfaced Nincompoop
laszlo said:
i think is not a flaw but a NSA "feature" implemented from the start...

now when all went public all involved exposed parts patch the disclosed issues...

i bet there are more undisclosed implemented vulnerabilities, which are used by agencies for data collection, undetected by anyone...
Except that it's related to something very fundemental in CPU design. Like the 90s fundemental.
Posted on Reply
#15
davidm71
Some guy in tech thread I follow posted this:

And I quote user JC for short:

"
It's really hard for me to call this a bug. These people didn't go
"read" kernel memory, in any traditional sense. They used detailed
knowledge of the architecture and cache behavior, and some very clever
statistical analysis of the resulting timing, to intuit the value of
individual bits in otherwise inaccessible memory. This strikes me as
the same kind of attack as the people who "cracked" RSA by measuring the
CPU's voltage consumption during the encoding process and intuiting the
plaintext by the path through the code.

"

IE this was no bug but a major NSA level hack!!!

Thank you WikiLeaks!! Slowed all our machines!!!

Burn in hell!!!
Posted on Reply
#16
Vayra86
davidm71 said:
Some guy in tech thread I follow posted this:

And I quote user JC for short:

"
It's really hard for me to call this a bug. These people didn't go
"read" kernel memory, in any traditional sense. They used detailed
knowledge of the architecture and cache behavior, and some very clever
statistical analysis of the resulting timing, to intuit the value of
individual bits in otherwise inaccessible memory. This strikes me as
the same kind of attack as the people who "cracked" RSA by measuring the
CPU's voltage consumption during the encoding process and intuiting the
plaintext by the path through the code.

"

IE this was no bug but a major NSA level hack!!!

Thank you WikiLeaks!! Slowed all our machines!!!

Burn in hell!!!
Not sure if trolling or just outright stupid.

Can you even read the piece you just quoted? You sure as hell don't understand what it says.
Posted on Reply
#17
jaggerwild
Vayra86 said:
Not sure if trolling or just outright stupid.

Can you even read the piece you just quoted? You sure as hell don't understand what it says.
Whats so hard to understand, its pretty easy to think that this might have been implemented on purpose then they pretend "oh we have a vulnerability" in the back door cause some one got caught? Or even the fix could be a back door opener.
I respect WIKI LEAKS as they released the video "Collateral Murder", and the day to day logs of the second gulf war, you could basically see how many people were killed per day and if they were friendly or enemy or civilian. Its a real eye opener for people who never been to a war. To think a Gov. doesn't spy on it's people, is to be pretty doped up.
Posted on Reply
#18
Vayra86
davidm71 said:
Vayra86 Relax. Go have a beer or something. Not everything is meant to be taken literally. God almighty..
You came off quite serious in your statements, I never spotted an /s for sarcasm either.

Also when you first post

davidm71 said:
Re


I agree. Sounds like a NSA backdoor. Reminds of the Black Mirror Face the Nation episode almost!
And then follow up with a quote... how are you not being serious?

Really man, if this is your style, we have 4chan for that BS. Don't spread it here.

Now you're even deleting your post. ???
Posted on Reply
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