Friday, March 9th 2018

AMD Product Roadmap Slides for 2020 Leaked - "Castle Peak" TR4 and "Dali"

Continuing with its trend of leaking AMD slides, Spanish website Informatica Cero has now published some purported company slides leading up to AMD's 2020 strategy. New information concerns the appearance of a new, value-oriented mobile APU in the form of "Dali" - let's hope performance on that is slightly more predictable than the particular style of the artist whose name it follows. Dali therefore joins AMD's "Renoir" APU and "Vermeer" CPUs (both expected in the 7 nm process) for AMD's 2020 roadmap. This is an interesting product, which AMD is likely positioning for tablets and ultraportables.

Another interesting tidbit is AMD's outlook for their Threadripper line of HEDT CPUs. The company is looking towards its 7 nm rendition of these powerhouse chips, codenamed "Castle Peak", to bring them, in a literal way, to that figurative peak. AMD compares Threadripper to a Monster Truck of computing, and is apparently hoping to introduce Castle Peak as early as 2019. AMD then plans to further refine these "process inflection point" products in a new generation to come right after, in 2020 (much like the company has done now with Zen and Zen+).

AMD expects these CPUs to bring them towards a "leadership position in the HEDT market", with new "high water marks in performance and efficiency" and new platform features that "take TR to the next level." AMD has certainly earned a lot of goodwill from customers - and the overall market, if you discount Dell - on the back of its Zen-powered products. here's hoping they can continue their winning streak and deliver even more impressive products. Source: Informatica Cero
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42 Comments on AMD Product Roadmap Slides for 2020 Leaked - "Castle Peak" TR4 and "Dali"

#1
acperience7
Wait, did you guys add that monster truck, or is that from the official slide/leak. I couldn't help laughing when I saw it!
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#2
RejZoR
Considering it has "Monster Truck" in the title, I'd say it was added there by AMD :D
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#4
HD64G
And here is the confirmation that AM4 is to live for 2 cpu gens, including 2 updates between them, and thus for 4-5 years since the Ryzen CPU launch buyers will be able to get new cpus for the same motherboard they bought in 2017. Having said that, I think the upcoming Ryzen+ gen will be the best one to get and keep upgrading from that on, since memory compatibility and clocks will be much better then with the first chipsets fro Ryzen.
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#5
Steevo
They should have used something with jiggly bits, its worked for Nvidia........
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#6
R0H1T
Oh come on, the second slide screams fake :rolleyes:

That is not to say the info is all trash, rather the slides are quite likely unofficial or faked :shadedshu:
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#7
xkm1948
Dominant HEDT.....

Keep on dreaming brah, I don't deny the good price/performance ratio of Threadripper. But dominating? That is a big claim.
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#8
trparky
GloFlo's 7nm process is when things for AMD really get interesting. With the current process AMD is really pushing it to the very edge of what the 14nm and 14nm+ (12nm) process technologies can deliver, you can see this in how (even with Zen+) clock speeds are still hovering close to 4 GHz which is really hurting them when compared to that of the Intel Core i7-8700K chip which can overclock to 4.8 GHz and even as high as 5 GHz without even breaking a sweat. AMD needs higher clock speeds to be able to really give Intel the thorough ass kicking that they so richly deserve, there is no doubt about this very truth.

This isn't to say that Intel hasn't had their ass kicked by AMD but no, it's not good enough. I want Intel to have such an ass kicking that they'll be pissing blood for a week!!!
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#9
FreedomEclipse
~Technological Technocrat~
Good thing they didn't name it 'bali'. That would of been one bomb of a cpu
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#10
dicktracy
My body is ready. Threadripper 3 vs Ice Lake-X. The best performer gets my money.
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#11
jigar2speed
"acperience7 said:
Wait, did you guys add that monster truck, or is that from the official slide/leak. I couldn't help laughing when I saw it!
"RejZoR said:
Considering it has "Monster Truck" in the title, I'd say it was added there by AMD :D
This is added by leaker and color has also been changed to avoid getting tracked.
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#12
Vya Domus
"trparky said:
Intel Core i7-8700K chip which can overclock to 4.8 GHz and even as high as 5 GHz without even breaking a sweat.
It does brake a sweat though and it's likely all we'll see from Intel for a long time.
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#13
trparky
"Vya Domus said:
It does break a sweat though and it's likely all we'll see from Intel for a long time.
I've been researching the hell out of this subject and everything I've read has said that it's so stinkin' easy to overclock an 8700K that a novice could do it. Hell, some of the enthusiast motherboards come with overclocking profiles to do it for you with nothing more than a click of a mouse button in UEFI. Meanwhile I read about Ryzen chips barely breaking 3.8 GHz and those that have are extremely lucky to do so because they won the so-called "silicon lottery".
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#14
Vya Domus
"trparky said:
Meanwhile I read about Ryzen chips barely breaking 3.8 GHz and those that have are extremely lucky
Not really true. 4.0-4.1 is rare , what's below that is pretty common and achievable.
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#15
evernessince
"trparky said:
I've been researching the hell out of this subject and everything I've read has said that it's so stinkin' easy to overclock an 8700K that a novice could do it. Hell, some of the enthusiast motherboards come with overclocking profiles to do it for you with nothing more than a click of a mouse button in UEFI. Meanwhile I read about Ryzen chips barely breaking 3.8 GHz and those that have are extremely lucky to do so because they won the so-called "silicon lottery".
Yeah and there are profiles for 4.1 and 4.2GHz on my Ryzen motherboard, sure as hell doesn't mean it's going to work nor do I want my voltage set to 1.45v. Enthusiast motherboards come with those profiles but they expect you know the danger of high voltage.

The 8700K requires an aftermarket cooler. Not exactly something I'd expect a novice to know which one to buy.

Getting 5GHz on an 8700K is possible if you win the silicon lottery and you have a good cooler and even then you might have to delid.

Ryzen+ is coming out soon anyways with the 2700X releasing with a stock clock of 4.35GHz and the 2800X will be even higher. That with the cache and memory improvements mean the 8700K will have squat in the way of an IPC and clock speed advantage. The only thing it will have is hotter temps, higher power consumption, and lower multi-core performance.
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#16
Jism
"trparky said:
GloFlo's 7nm process is when things for AMD really get interesting. With the current process AMD is really pushing it to the very edge of what the 14nm and 14nm+ (12nm) process technologies can deliver, you can see this in how (even with Zen+) clock speeds are still hovering close to 4 GHz which is really hurting them when compared to that of the Intel Core i7-8700K chip which can overclock to 4.8 GHz and even as high as 5 GHz without even breaking a sweat. AMD needs higher clock speeds to be able to really give Intel the thorough ass kicking that they so richly deserve, there is no doubt about this very truth.

This isn't to say that Intel hasn't had their ass kicked by AMD but no, it's not good enough. I want Intel to have such an ass kicking that they'll be pissing blood for a week!!!
It's not really the amount of NM's but the type of proces. You can even design on 0.28nm and still deliver 5GHz speeds. It's just that this typical glofo design is aimed for a good performance / watt and not blazing speed as it was with FX / Vishera. The design simply craps out at 4 to 4.2GHz AVG and you have to be very lucky to hit 4.4GHz.

AMD has a winner with ZEN.
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#17
trparky
"Jism said:
AMD has a winner with ZEN.
To a certain extent... yes, then it falls flat because it can't clock high enough and because of that those of us who need higher single threaded performance (like me, due to ancient inefficiently and poorly written software/games) Intel is the only choice. Will this change next year with GloFlo 7nm? Hopefully that is the case and that Zen 2 will be able to clock as high as 5.5 GHz (or even 5.75 GHz!!!) on the high-end and 5 GHz in the mid-range because that's when this architecture will really take off like a rocket. Unfortunately it's not quite there yet with the 4 GHz clock limitation when compared to their Intel cousins.

It may not sound like much but a 500 MHz difference can be the difference between a piece of poorly written software running great and it running like crap.
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#18
Jism
"trparky said:
To a certain extent... yes, then it falls flat because it can't clock high enough and because of that those of us who need higher single threaded performance (like me, due to ancient inefficiently and poorly written software/games) Intel is the only choice. Will this change next year with GloFlo 7nm? Hopefully that is the case and that Zen 2 will be able to clock as high as 5.5 GHz (or even 5.75 GHz!!!) on the high-end and 5 GHz in the mid-range because that's when this architecture will really take off like a rocket. Unfortunately it's not quite there yet with the 4 GHz clock limitation when compared to their Intel cousins.

It may not sound like much but a 500 MHz difference can be the difference between a piece of poorly written software running great and it running like crap.
I think they Ryzen 1 is a good middle class CPU that can compete on almost every front. I am still working with a 8320 clocking at 4.8Ghz with 2400MHz DDR3, i woud'nt say that games such as Pubg on a RX580 8GB are running 'bad' on WQHD as i am getting over a 120FPS solid. The difference is not so great that i would really really need an Intel CPU with more expensive motherboards in order to play my games in a correct matter.

Ryzen 2 will be a refresh and with a 10% IPC improvement and some small tweaks. The thing really boots off the ground when that CPU could do 4GHz of DDR4 RAM since the CPU loves fast memory. It's a design choice to skimp on proces costs and scale the CPU as much as possible (when needed) with a downside that with slower ram, the CPU might perform a little less compared to the counterpart intel.

You could play with Turbo, and have your single core(s) booted up to a much faster speed within respects of TDP. Your problem would be solved then. It's not like they deliver an 8 core CPU at 3.5Ghz Base which could not boot 2 cores up to 4.1 Ghz or so. That's the whole point behind turbo. Scale when you need it.

Looking at the memory pickness of Ryzen 1 i planned on waiting for the refreshed Ryzen or even TR as i am going to slamm a 2k on a complete new system. You learn alot about AMD CPU's when you OC it and where the actuall sweetspot or better say the weak spot is which could be improved. The 83xx series of AMD is not that bad, you just have to know where the weak points of the CPU are and OC that to your best benefit. The IMC / CPU-NB is the biggest flaw in a Vishera. OC that and you'll see a 10FPS difference on stock clocks.
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#19
Vya Domus
"Jism said:
The IMC / CPU-NB is the biggest flaw in a Vishera. OC that and you'll see a 10FPS difference on stock clocks.
To be honest I have never seen any difference whatsoever overclocking the northbridge.
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#20
trparky
I get it, Intel chips overclock extremely well but the only downside is that they become heat pumps on a chip. As you ramp the speed up it becomes increasingly more difficult to cool them.

AMD Ryzen however is an extremely young architecture, it hasn't really hit its stride. Next year with Zen 2 (with 7nm) is going to be what really allows Ryzen to stretch its legs and really fly. Mark my words here people, it will fly! Not only will it be able to clock as high as Intel chips (and probably even more so) can but unlike Intel it will be able to do so minus the major heat problem. Zen 2 with be the ultimate Intel killer, it will be the silver bullet that will put down the diseased dog that is Intel.
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#21
jboydgolfer
"Raevenlord said:
let's hope performance on that is slightly more predictable than the particular style of the artist whose name it follows.
id bet more than a few dollars that you'll never have another organic opportunity to squeeze in a Salvador Dali reference again ;)

nice article BTW.
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#22
hat
Enthusiast
@trparky speaks the truth. A lot of games really benefit from that high single thread performance cause they're coded like crap... (looks at 7 days to die)
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#23
trparky
What I also eventually see is that with Zen 2 it may force Intel to go back to the drawing board and build a new architecture from scratch. Why do I expect that to happen? Because I expect Zen 2 to positively wipe the floor with Intel. Zen 2 is proof positive of what can be done with a new architecture.
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#24
Jism
"Vya Domus said:
To be honest I have never seen any difference whatsoever overclocking the northbridge.
"CPU/NB"

It's responsible for L2 cache speed as well. You speed up the CPU drasticly by oc'ing the CPU/NB from 2400 up to 2800 or even if you have a good chip up to 3GHz.

Not to be confused with HTT (=FSB) or "HT LINK" which does not really do anything at all.
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#25
Vya Domus
"Jism said:
"CPU/NB"

It's responsible for L2 cache speed as well. You speed up the CPU drasticly by oc'ing the CPU/NB from 2400 up to 2800 or even if you have a good chip up to 3GHz.

Not to be confused with HTT (=FSB) or "HT LINK" which does not really do anything at all.
CPU Northbridge should affect L3 speeds.

CPU NB: CPU NorthBridge (should not be confused with NorthBridge chipset, such as the AMD 990FX chipset) – part of the CPU that has its own clock domain and voltage plane. CPU NB clock frequency determines the Memory controller and L3 cache speed. CPU NB has a notable impact on overall system performance.

https://www.amd.com/Documents/AMD_FX_Performance_Tuning_Guide.pdf
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