Monday, March 19th 2018

Nimbus Data Launches Their 100TB ExaDrive DC100 SSD

Nimbus Data, a pioneer in flash memory solutions, today announced the ExaDrive DC100, the largest capacity (100 terabytes) solid state drive (SSD) ever produced. Featuring more than 3x the capacity of the closest competitor, the ExaDrive DC100 also draws 85% less power per terabyte (TB). These innovations reduce total cost of ownership per terabyte by 42% compared to competing enterprise SSDs, helping accelerate flash memory adoption in both cloud infrastructure and edge computing.

"As flash memory prices decline, capacity, energy efficiency, and density will become the critical drivers of cost reduction and competitive advantage," stated Thomas Isakovich, CEO and founder of Nimbus Data. "The ExaDrive DC100 meets these challenges for both data center and edge applications, offering unmatched capacity in an ultra-low power design."
Optimized to Maximize Flash Storage Capacity and Efficiency
While existing SSDs focus on speed, the DC100 is optimized for capacity and efficiency. With its patent-pending multiprocessor architecture, the DC100 supports much greater capacity than monolithic flash controllers. Using 3D NAND, the DC100 provides enough flash capacity to store 20 million songs, 20,000 HD movies, or 2,000 iPhones worth of data in a device small enough to fit in your back pocket. For data centers, a single rack of DC100 SSDs can achieve over 100 petabytes of raw capacity. Data centers can reduce power, cooling, and rack space costs by 85% per terabyte, enabling more workloads to move to flash at the lowest possible total cost of ownership.

Plug-and-Play and Balanced Performance for Diverse Workloads
Featuring the same 3.5" form factor and SATA interface used by hard drives, the ExaDrive DC100 is plug-and-play compatible with hundreds of storage and server platforms. The DC100's low-power (0.1 watts/TB) and portability also make it well-suited for edge and IoT applications. The DC100 achieves up to 100,000 IOps (read or write) and up to 500 MBps throughput. This equally-balanced read/write performance is ideal for a wide range of workloads, from big data and machine learning to rich content and cloud infrastructure.

"The release of such a high capacity flash device that is fully compatible with HDD form factors opens up the opportunity to turbo charge big data platforms while at the same time improving reliability, significantly reducing device count, increasing data mobility, and lowering the TCO of multi-PB scale storage platforms," said Eric Burgener, research vice president of Storage at IDC. "Devices of this class will allow flash to cost-effectively penetrate a broader set of use cases outside of tier 0 and tier 1 applications."

Superior Reliability and Complete Data Protection
The ExaDrive DC100 is protected by an unlimited endurance guarantee for 5 years. By doing away with confusing drive-writes-per-day restrictions, the DC100 offers peace of mind, reduces hardware refresh cycles, and eliminates costly support renewals. Embedded capacitors ensure that buffered data is safely protected if there is a sudden power loss. Encryption, multiple ECC processors, and a secure-erase feature ensure data security. The DC100 offers a mean time between failures (MTBF) of 2.5 million hours.

Availability, Certifications, and Pricing
The ExaDrive DC series includes both 100 TB and 50 TB models. It is currently sampling to strategic customers and will be generally available in summer 2018. Nimbus Data has qualified the DC series in storage and server enclosures from major vendors. Pricing will be similar to existing enterprise SSDs on a per terabyte basis while offering 85% lower operating costs. Overall, the ExaDrive DC series will cost 42% less per terabyte over a 5-year period compared to existing enterprise SSDs. This TCO advantage factors in the superior endurance, balanced read/write performance, power savings, cooling savings, rack space savings, component reduction, and lower refresh costs.
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16 Comments on Nimbus Data Launches Their 100TB ExaDrive DC100 SSD

#1
Prima.Vera
LOL 100TB SSDs... And I'm still rocking with 4TB HDD :laugh::laugh::laugh::laugh::laugh:
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#2
kastriot
Lucky you i have 500GB HDD still for backup :p
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#3
natr0n
I could fit every redump set on that.
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#4
Drone
ExaDrive sounds misleading.

1 exabyte = 1 million terabytes
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#5
dj-electric
What humanity is capable of vs real life of ssd market
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#6
BadFrog
Drone, post: 3815521, member: 87818"
ExaDrive sounds misleading.

1 exabyte = 1 million terabytes
I love the marketing department of tech companies. I remember not to long ago, they were marketing "gaming" into their products and most recently RGB and up charging customers. :kookoo:
Posted on Reply
#7
newtekie1
Semi-Retired Folder
I'm interested on how they achieve this size. I assume this can't be a single controller design.
Posted on Reply
#8
D.Crepit
These types of press releases
are worthless without the price.

Eventually, you expect stuff like this to be
released. You need the price to decide
if and when its "main streamable".
Posted on Reply
#9
BadFrog
newtekie1, post: 3815618, member: 20670"
I'm interested on how they achieve this size. I assume this can't be a single controller design.
"The ExaDrive DC-series SSDs are based on Nimbus’ proprietary architecture, featuring four custom NAND controllers and a management processor. The drives use 3D MLC NAND flash memory made by SK Hynix in proprietary packaging. Nimbus does not disclose the ECC mechanism supported by the controllers, but keeping in mind that we are dealing with a 3D MLC-based device, it does not need a very strong ECC for maximum endurance. "

https://www.anandtech.com/show/12541/unlimited-5-year-endurance-100-tb-ssd

Looks to be 4

D.Crepit, post: 3815620, member: 152099"
These types of press releases
are worthless without the price.

Eventually, you expect stuff like this to be
released. You need the price to decide
if and when its "main streamable".
Will be available in Summer 2018. This won't be mainstream anytime soon for us mere mortals. The Samsung 15 tb SSD (PM1633a) sells for a cool $10k, I can only imagine what the 100tb Exadrive will MSRP for this summer $50K+ :kookoo:
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#10
CheapMeat
I wonder how many daughter PCB stacks it has, probably three. I'd honestly not mind if 3.5" SSDs for consumers came out, especially with QLC NAND. A lot of people have the bay devices or chassis with 3.5" HDDs in them, so like mentioned here for enterprise, it could be a nice drop in over time. Of course not necessarily 100TB....not enough* kidneys for that.
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#11
Loosenut
2 kidneys and the left testy...

Can you imagine the ROI for a Burst miner on this?
Posted on Reply
#12
lemonadesoda
It makes no sense to have just one of these... since I can do better (cheaper and failsafer) by having 4 or 5 smaller drives on a RAID 5. Therefore, this is designed for implementing in at least a 4 way RAID setup. Mind boggles at the cost :kookoo:
Posted on Reply
#13
lexluthermiester
lemonadesoda, post: 3815753, member: 29805"
It makes no sense to have just one of these... since I can do better (cheaper and failsafer) by having 4 or 5 smaller drives on a RAID 5. Therefore, this is designed for implementing in at least a 4 way RAID setup. Mind boggles at the cost :kookoo:
Your statement suggests implementation in consumers sectors. That's not the focus of the drive. It is intended for data center drive arrays, web servers and many other enterprise-level multi-drive deployment scenarios. No one but the very wealthy would entertain using something this expensive in a personal system.
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#14
CheapMeat
lemonadesoda, post: 3815753, member: 29805"
It makes no sense to have just one of these... since I can do better (cheaper and failsafer) by having 4 or 5 smaller drives on a RAID 5. Therefore, this is designed for implementing in at least a 4 way RAID setup. Mind boggles at the cost :kookoo:
Yeah, as lex mentioned, it's for enterprise and without a doubt they'd be buying multiples of them with all kinds of redundancy schemes.
Posted on Reply
#15
Brusfantomet
for these kind of storage the interface seems like a slight bottleneck, at 500 MB/s it will take close to 140 days, or over 4 months of constant writing to fill it up.

Then again, if you need massive space, medium access speed and low power usage its maybe the correct product?
Posted on Reply
#16
lemonadesoda
CheapMeat"
[quote=lexluthermiester"][quote=the article "][quote=jack and jill"][quote=Einstein"]A table, a chair, a bowl of fruit and a violin; what else does a man need to be happy?
[/quote][/quote][/quote][/quote]
CheapMeat"
[quote=lexluthermiester"][quote=the article "][quote=jack and jill"][quote=Einstein"]
[/quote][/quote][/quote][/quote]What's that expression? No sht sherlock.

Brusfantomet, post: 3815869, member: 104119"
for these kind of storage the interface seems like a slight bottleneck, at 500 MB/s it will take close to 140 days, or over 4 months of constant writing to fill it up.

Then again, if you need massive space, medium access speed and low power usage its maybe the correct product?
Does not compute! Please recalculate.
Posted on Reply
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