Thursday, June 28th 2018

Prices of First-gen AMD Threadrippers Drop Like a Rock

Intel's strategy against AMD's unexpected doubling in core-counts of its Ryzen Threadripper HEDT processors has been that of a headless chicken in a room painted Vantablack. It announced a 28-core processor that would require you to buy a new motherboard; and is frantically working on a 22-core processor for the existing LGA2066 platform. It's looking like AMD isn't in a mood to walk into Intel's core-count trap, and could hit Intel where it hurts the most - pricing. The top-dog 32-core part has already reared its head on German web-stores, seeking a little over 1,500€, just 500€ more than the price its previous-generation 16-core flagship, the Threadripper 1950X launched at. At 1,500€-ish, AMD could end up disrupting Intel's entire >10-core lineup that's priced between $1199 to $1999, currently occupied by 12-core, 14-core, 16-core, and 18-core SKUs.

AMD may not spare Intel's sub-$1000 Core X lineup, either. Prices of first-generation Ryzen Threadripper processors are seeing a dramatic drop, with the flagship Threadripper 1950X being priced under 650€. Prices of the 12-core Threadripper 1920X have slipped to just under 550€. The Core i9-7900X, meanwhile, continues to command a touch over 880€. The drop in prices of first-gen Threadrippers is likely retailers trying to clear out inventories to make room for 2nd generation Threadrippers. It could also be a prelude to AMD announcing more affordable 12-core and 16-core Threadrippers based on the 2nd generation "Zen+" architecture.
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77 Comments on Prices of First-gen AMD Threadrippers Drop Like a Rock

#1
neko77025
I have been eyeballing A Ryzen 1700 as A upgrade to A few PCs I have running (as in dropping 3x pcs for ESXi VMs) .. but not sure if I am try to talk my self into or out of getting A 1950x .

1700
Pros
Cheaper, only 65w, all I really need to replace 3computers and only need 2 sticks of ram to get up and running

cons
Not as cool ?
-----
1950x
Pros
More core for ea VM or more VMs, More PCIe Lans for VMs, faster clocks per VM

Cons
Cost $$$(Ram/ MB / CPU / Cooling / Overall) , Overkill, 180w
....


Hmm now after that thinking maybe 2700x will be my best bet.

Arg
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#2
Konceptz
neko77025 said:
I have been eyeballing A Ryzen 1700 as A upgrade to A few PCs I have running (as in dropping 3x pcs for ESXi VMs) .. but not sure if I am try to talk my self into or out of getting A 1950x .

1700
Pros
Cheaper, only 65w, all I really need to replace 3computers and only need 2 sticks of ram to get up and running

cons
Not as cool ?
-----
1950x
Pros
More core for ea VM or more VMs, More PCIe Lans for VMs, faster clocks per VM

Cons
Cost $$$(Ram/ MB / CPU / Cooling / Overall) , Overkill, 180w
....


Hmm now after that thinking maybe 2700x will be my best bet.

Arg
I recently built 2 ESXi hosts for clients, one using TR and the other using a 1800. Honestly you cant go wrong either way but if I were you, i'd wait for the Ryzen 2700 (i think?) if its still coming or go threadripper if you need the PCI lanes.
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