Monday, August 20th 2018

NVIDIA Announces Partnerships With Multiple Studios to Bring RTX Tech to Gamers

(Update 1: Added the full 21 games list for RTX support.)

NVIDIA CEO Jensen Huang at the company's Koln event announced partnerships with multiple games studios. This is part of NVIDIA's push to bring real time ray tracing and NVIDIA's RTX platforms' achievements to actual games that gamers can play. These encompass heavy hitters such as Battlefield V (DICE), Hitman 2 (IO Interactive), Shadow of the Tomb Raider (Crystal Dynamics), Metro Exodus (4A Games) and Control (Remedy Entertainment).

However, not all games are made equal, and NVIDIA knows there are significant gaming experiences coming from other, smaller studios. That's why partnerships have been established with the studios developing games such as We Happy Few (Compulsion Games), Atomic Heart (Mundfish), Assetto Corsa Competizione (Kunos Simulazioni), just to name a few. Of course, RTX's nature as a technology depends on NVIDIA's push for the initial implementation wave, and the company will be looking to bring developers up to speed with all needed programming skills, needs and difficulties inherent to the adoption of any new development framework. However, that DICE have already implemented an Alpha Version of NVIDIA's RTX technology into Battlefield V is surely a good sign.

The full 21 games to feature RTX support as announced by NVIDIA follow:
  • Ark: Survival Evolved
  • Assetto Corsa Competizione
  • Atomic Heart (2019)
  • Battlefield V
  • Control
  • Dauntless
  • In Death
  • Enlisted
  • Final Fantasy XV
  • The Forge Arena
  • Fractured Lands
  • Hitman 2
  • Justice
  • JX3
  • Mechwarrior V: Mercenaries
  • Metro Exodus
  • PlayerUnknown's BattleGrounds
  • Remnant from the Ashes (2019)
  • Serious Sam 4: Planet Badass
  • Shadow of the Tomb Raider
  • We Happy Few
Source: Jensen Hunag Presentation, Koln
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99 Comments on NVIDIA Announces Partnerships With Multiple Studios to Bring RTX Tech to Gamers

#1
wiak
"there goes the nabourhood" :(
Posted on Reply
#2
RejZoR
Yay, more of the GameWorks stuff... I miss the days when tech was standardized under DirectX and we had shit that ran about the same on all cards. And we also had proper HW accelerated sound...
Posted on Reply
#3
Fluffmeister
Looks like they will have TrueAudio trumped pretty quick, although that was a low bar.
Posted on Reply
#4
Recus
"RejZoR said:
Yay, more of the GameWorks stuff... I miss the days when tech was standardized under DirectX and we had shit that ran about the same on all cards. And we also had proper HW accelerated sound...
But it is. Microsoft DXR.
Posted on Reply
#6
StrayKAT
Looks like Win10/DX12 will finally get some love.. (although it seems pretty popular already).


Not that it matters me (Vega user).
Posted on Reply
#9
oxidized
The only game i care about here is Atomic Hearts. The rest is fkn crap.
Posted on Reply
#10
cucker tarlson
That new quantum break-like game from remedy will be sick too.And neither of them is crap, they'll be great.
Posted on Reply
#11
StrayKAT
"cucker tarlson said:
That new quantum break-like game from remedy will be sick too.
Sidenote: Is Quantum Break good? I didn't even realize it was Remedy. Now I feel bad.
Posted on Reply
#12
oxidized
"cucker tarlson said:
That new quantum break-like game from remedy will be sick too.
I really don't count on it...Looks way too much like Quantum break, basically a mediocre game.
Posted on Reply
#13
cucker tarlson
"StrayKAT said:
Sidenote: Is Quantum Break good? I didn't even realize it was Remedy. Now I feel bad.
It was really good.
"oxidized said:
I really don't count on it...Looks way too much like Quantum break, basically a mediocre game.
lol,mediocre
Posted on Reply
#14
oxidized
"cucker tarlson said:
It was really good.

lol,mediocre
Mediocre, and i'm being kind.
Posted on Reply
#15
cucker tarlson
"oxidized said:
Mediocre, and i'm being kind.
I liked it a lot.
Posted on Reply
#16
oxidized
"cucker tarlson said:
I liked it a lot.
Fine, i'm not saying you shouldn't have, but it remains a mediocre game, there's nothing bad about liking not objectively good things, but at least one should be able to distinguish what one likes and what is objectively good. I like some mediocre games too, but i realize that.
Posted on Reply
#17
FordGT90Concept
"I go fast!1!11!1!"
"biffzinker said:
https://blogs.msdn.microsoft.com/directx/2018/03/19/announcing-microsoft-directx-raytracing/
DirectX Raytracing is just a framework for doing raytracing on GPU. It doesn't say how. DXR isn't going to replace dynamic lighting in games for decades. The cost-benefit isn't there. Developers would rather up the polygon count than spend an even bigger budget of cycles on lighting.

Just look at the RTX 20xx line up. 2080 Ti can do 10 Grays where 2070 can only do 6 Grays. Here's an article that shows the difference based on samples per pixel:
https://raytracey.blogspot.com/2010/04/comparing-path-tracing-image-quality.html

4K = 8,294,400 pixels
if targeting minimum 30 frames per second: 248,832,000 pixels per second to illuminate
RTX 2070 = 6 Gray = 24 samples/pixel

10 Gray = 40 samples/pixel

They both look like shit to me (first is grainy, second is blurry). And that's not even figuring in the latency this tech adds to generating frames.

Until we have benchmarks with side by side comparisons of image quality and frame rate, we're not going to know if NVIDIA's venture into ray tracing made any sense whatsoever. It's smoke and mirrors right now. Raytracing is not new. The methods we use for lighting today were developed because they do the job at significantly lower hardware costs. I'm not convinced NVIDIA changed that paradigm. Any of these cards cost twice as much as your average gaming card.
Posted on Reply
#18
biffzinker
"FordGT90Concept said:
They both look like shit to me (first is grainy, second is blurry). And that's not even figuring in the latency this tech adds to generating frames.
Isn't that where the Tensor Cores come into play for a de-nosie algorithm (AI?)
Posted on Reply
#19
bug
"Recus said:
But it is. Microsoft DXR.
Bah, throwing facts at a perfectly good rant. This should be punishable by ban :D

"FordGT90Concept said:
DirectX Raytracing is just a framework for doing raytracing on GPU. It doesn't say how. DXR isn't going to replace dynamic lighting in games for decades. The cost-benefit isn't there. Developers would rather up the polygon count than spend an even bigger budget of cycles on lighting.

Just look at the RTX 20xx line up. 2080 Ti can do 10 Grays where 2070 can only do 6 Grays. Here's an article that shows the difference based on samples per pixel:
https://raytracey.blogspot.com/2010/04/comparing-path-tracing-image-quality.html

4K = 8,294,400 pixels
if targeting minimum 30 frames per second: 248,832,000 pixels per second to illuminate
RTX 2070 = 6 Gray = 24 samples/pixel

10 Gray = 40 samples/pixel

They both look like shit to me (first is grainy, second is blurry). And that's not even figuring in the latency this tech adds to generating frames.

Until we have benchmarks with side by side comparisons of image quality and frame rate, we're not going to know if NVIDIA's venture into ray tracing made any sense whatsoever. It's smoke and mirrors right now. Raytracing is not new. The methods we use for lighting today were developed because they do the job at significantly lower hardware costs. I'm not convinced NVIDIA changed that paradigm. Any of these cards cost twice as much as your average gaming card.
You nailed it. You figured out what Nvidia never noticed and now they are all doomed.

You see ray tracing every single time you watch a movie with CGI in it. Ever wondered why that is?
Posted on Reply
#20
FordGT90Concept
"I go fast!1!11!1!"
Tensor cores are just 4x4x4 matrix. Yes, it can denoise, but traditional rendering methods have no noise--noise is injected via AA to soften edges.

The machine in this video has 4xTesla V100
https://www.pcworld.com/article/3281332/components-graphics/nvidia-rtx-real-time-ray-tracing-demo-e3.html

NVIDIA provides this graph (presumably RTX 2080 Ti):


They don't say what resolution the demo is running at. It's also panning very slowly which reduces workload per frame. Author noticed frame rate dip with raytracing enabled. Remedy (developer of demo) likely didn't put the effort in to make traditional methods look almost as good as ray traced (e.g. they didn't even try to do reflections in water which I just saw that in Dishonored: Death of the Outsider...it was pretty...without ray tracing).


"bug said:
You see ray tracing every single time you watch a movie with CGI in it. Ever wondered why that is?
Pre-rendered on Linux server farms.
Posted on Reply
#21
Darmok N Jalad
"bug said:
Bah, throwing facts at a perfectly good rant. This should be punishable by ban :D


You nailed it. You figured out what Nvidia never noticed and now they are all doomed.

You see ray tracing every single time you watch a movie with CGI in it. Ever wondered why that is?
Per Wikipedia:
“CGI for films is usually rendered at about 1.4–6 megapixels. Toy Story, for example, was rendered at 1536 × 922. The time to render one frame is typically around 2–3 hours, with ten times that for the most complex scenes. This time hasn't changed much in the last decade, as image quality progressed at the same rate as improvements in hardware.”

Seems like we may still be a long way from games using it at high levels of detail, though maybe a cartoon-style game could pull it off?
Posted on Reply
#22
Divide Overflow
"Bring RTX Tech to Gamers"
Read as: Forcing game developers to implement NVIDIA proprietary code paths for all video cards. Performance penalty may apply.
Posted on Reply
#23
cucker tarlson
"oxidized said:
Fine, i'm not saying you shouldn't have, but it remains a mediocre game, there's nothing bad about liking not objectively good things, but at least one should be able to distinguish what one likes and what is objectively good. I like some mediocre games too, but i realize that.
You should realize that your opinion is the opposite of objective.It's subjectively mediocre,it's mediocre in your opinion.
Posted on Reply
#24
Prima.Vera
"Divide Overflow said:
"Bring RTX Tech to Gamers"
Read as: Forcing game developers to implement NVIDIA proprietary code paths for all video cards. Performance penalty may apply.
They cannot force a company to do anything. The can only "sponsor them (read: bribe)" heavely to implement those "features" into the game engines.
Posted on Reply
#25
FordGT90Concept
"I go fast!1!11!1!"
"Darmok N Jalad said:
Seems like we may still be a long way from games using it at high levels of detail, though maybe a cartoon-style game could pull it off?
That's not the way raytracing works. Light source -> bounces -> eye. What it bounces off of (be a highly detailed model or a matte colored wall) doesn't matter in terms of compute. All it changes is the information the ray carries.


I see what NVIDIA is trying to do: end the use of traditional lighting methods. But this is a problem because of backwards compatibility. They need a crapload of shaders to keep older games running while they also soak a crapload of transistors into RT and Tensor cores to raytrace and denoise it. Turing could be a lot better at either one. NVIDIA isn't wrong that we're at a branching point in computer graphics. Either we keep faking it until we make it or we start raytracing.
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