Monday, October 15th 2018

GIGABYTE Z390 OC Guide Suggests Intel 9000 Series Processors Will Run Hot Even With Custom Watercooling

It seems that by the time NDA drops on Intel's latest and greatest mainstream processor platform, we will have known more about it than ever before with similar launches. GIGABYTE joined the club with the release of their Z390 overclocking (OC) guide specific to their AORUS-branded motherboards. This contains a lot of useful information in general, and we certainly recommend taking a look at it in the source linked in the full post. As it is, a few items in the guide caught our eye- in particular, a direct quote saying "As you can tell from the last screenshots, the CPU temperature of the i9-9900k is quite high. This is something that we've noticed on almost all the processors. For this reason we suggest you to use a custom water-cooling and adjust the TjMAX Temperature to 110°C."

The quote references their guide to achieve a stable 5 GHz overclock on all cores on the Core i9-9900K, which was cooled via a custom watercooled setup and a Vcore ranging from 1.3-1.4 V. GIGABYTE's internal testing thus indicates that these higher end, unlocked 9000-series CPUs will run incredibly hot if you wish to push them, and the soldered IHS may not be as effective in cooling these dense processors as we may have hoped. Indeed, with news of the 28-core Xeon using thermal paste for the IHS, it appears that Intel may be conflicted on optimal cooling when battling the Core Wars with AMD.
Source: Gigabyte Z390 OC Guide
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43 Comments on GIGABYTE Z390 OC Guide Suggests Intel 9000 Series Processors Will Run Hot Even With Custom Watercooling

#2
champsilva
We can now discard Gigabyte from our board choices, those fake vrms will blow.
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#3
M2B
Considering the new information we got I don't see any point at overclocking these new intel CPU's for an average user.
I expected much lower temperatures with decent cooling.
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#4
R-T-B
champsilva, post: 3923894, member: 164164"
We can now discard Gigabyte from our board choices, those fake vrms will blow.
Gigabyte makes some boards with decent VRMs. Admitedly, a lot of them are pretty subpar though.
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#5
mcraygsx
Those are indeed high temps, 92c is pretty high for merely 5.0Ghz OC. 10nm cant get here soon enough since 14nm is on its last leg.

Gigabyte recommends setting TjMAX to 110C so the CPU wont throttle?
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#6
cadaveca
My name is Dave
Prima.Vera, post: 3923883, member: 98685"
245W for the CPU ???????
Where do you see that?

If from that screenshot above, note the 1.5V.

Meanwhile the guide recommends 1.3V - 1.4V.
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#7
Camm
champsilva, post: 3923894, member: 164164"
We can now discard Gigabyte from our board choices, those fake vrms will blow.
GB's done some serious work with their VRM's for the Z390 refresh. Shrug.
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#8
champsilva
Camm, post: 3923938, member: 110377"
GB's done some serious work with their VRM's for the Z390 refresh. Shrug.
But bios is bad yet =p
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#9
Camm
champsilva, post: 3923947, member: 164164"
But bios is bad yet =p
OMG that thing is terrible. I don't care ALL that much since I spend maybe an hour in bios each build, but fark, can you make one any worse? lol..
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#10
randomUser
The VRM on this board is not good. It is only an average. The heatsinks are good on the other hand, but VRM requires active cooling and plastic parts make it worse.

Now for the cpu. I don't see where exactly does it state 1.5V as somebody mentioned. All i see is vCore being 1.27-1.28V
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#11
buggalugs
randomUser, post: 3923981, member: 176138"
The VRM on this board is not good. It is only an average. The heatsinks are good on the other hand, but VRM requires active cooling and plastic parts make it worse.

Now for the cpu. I don't see where exactly does it state 1.5V as somebody mentioned. All i see is vCore being 1.27-1.28V
It says Vcore max 1.488v on the right hand side.

This is some bullshit. I dont like hot running chips, and it runs 5Ghz anyway on stock voltage with less cores. Its not really worth the effort if its going to run that hot.

What kind of temps with stock voltage?
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#13
Zubasa
buggalugs, post: 3924006, member: 56431"
It says Vcore max 1.488v on the right hand side.

This is some bullshit. I dont like hot running chips, and it runs 5Ghz anyway on stock voltage with less cores. Its not really worth the effort if its going to run that hot.

What kind of temps with stock voltage?
The 1.488V can actually be Gigabyte's crap bios and their shitty LLC setting over compensating for Vdroop.
Or it can be the VDroop on this board is so bad that you must set 1.5V in the bios to get 1.3V load.
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#14
las
They won't run "hot" as 8700K did. A friend of mine is already testing two of the 9th gen CPU's and I've seen both under stress. Nothing to wory about here.
Solder seems to be pretty equal to liquid metal in terms of temp drop.

Temp spikes are also gone. 8700K spiked instantly under load (before delid). Solder is a huge step forward here. Temp variance across cores are low too.
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#15
dj-electric
IMHO so far with 9th gen experience - high AVX OC is not the best option possible.
I truly believe that a healthy OC to 9th gen system is to separate AVX with an offset, because otherwise you might miss a potentially superb core frequency for all the non-AVX needs.
Posted on Reply
#16
buggalugs
Zubasa, post: 3924018, member: 30988"
The 1.488V can actually be Gigabyte's crap bios and their shitty LLC setting over compensating for Vdroop.
Or it can be the VDroop on this board is so bad that you must set 1.5V in the bios to get 1.3V load.
Yea probably, It says ES too for engineering sample, maybe Gigabyte has a bunch of ES CPUs and the production ones are better, hopefully.
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#17
Gungar
mcraygsx, post: 3923914, member: 151421"
Those are indeed high temps, 92c is pretty high for merely 5.0Ghz OC. 10nm cant get here soon enough since 14nm is on its last leg.

Gigabyte recommends setting TjMAX to 110C so the CPU wont throttle?
And what will happened with 10nm? 3 watts less power consumption? xD
Posted on Reply
#18
GWComputers
champsilva, post: 3923894, member: 164164"
We can now discard Gigabyte from our board choices, those fake vrms will blow.
Are you kidding?! Gigabyte is one of the best motherboard manufacturers in the World together with MSI and ASUS and i'm talking professionally. Working with these companies since early 2000 and only these 3 are solid. All the other brand except EVGA are a joke compared. In thousands and thousands of Gigabyte motherboards only 2 of them had some problems and i repeat "some" because they still work.
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#19
GinoLatino
With those temperatures, I wonder how long those CPU will last to the regular consumer...

Gungar, post: 3924035, member: 163163"
And what will happened with 10nm? 3 watts less power consumption? xD
Luckily we got our trusty CPU engineer to save the day... xD
Posted on Reply
#20
randomUser
GWComputers, post: 3924078, member: 165223"
Are you kidding?! Gigabyte is one of the best motherboard manufacturers in the World together with MSI and ASUS and i'm talking professionally. Working with these companies since early 2000 and only these 3 are solid. All the other brand except EVGA are a joke compared. In thousands and thousands of Gigabyte motherboards only 2 of them had some problems and i repeat "some" because they still work.
I do think he was not refering to breakdown chance of a motherboard.
He's talking about VRM design.

Well he might also not be correct, because gigabyte has really nice VRM boards here and there in every generation. And i must say, every manufacturer does too.
They all have crap motherboards and good motherboards.

The new GB Z390 boards going up from Elite have a decent VRM design because they are not just doubling the count of components (as in fake phases), they are actually using smart doublers.
The same cannot be told about Master board, it has a doubler, but it's not smart. In anyway, Z390 GB boards are almost 12 phases. Almost is because it's not true 12 phase but doubled 6, but it's arguably better than true 8 phase.

The only thing i am dissapointed about GB is that they did not use ISL99227 power stages as they did with their Z370 gaming 7 board.
They would have zero problems passively cooling the VRM even with the i9-9900k.

ISL99227 are being used in AsRock Z390 phantom gaming ITX tho, which is awesome, but low phase count will have harder time running big guys.
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#21
B-Real
las, post: 3924019, member: 111974"
They won't run "hot" as 8700K did. A friend of mine is already testing two of the 9th gen CPU's and I've seen both under stress. Nothing to wory about here.
Solder seems to be pretty equal to liquid metal in terms of temp drop.

Temp spikes are also gone. 8700K spiked instantly under load (before delid). Solder is a huge step forward here. Temp variance across cores are low too.
We will see in the reviews. At least Intel got the idea if they sell their CPUs expensive as hell, they should use soldering. Anyway, their prices are horror (nextgen is more expensive than CL) and even more horror (production problems).
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#22
John Naylor
The reason Intel stopped using solder was that they "didn't need it". While we skipped IB, all the CPUs we've installed and OC'd since hit the voltage wall before they hit the temperature wall. In any case, like every other generation, we'll wait till the 2nd / 3rd stepping CPUs / Boards arrive before doing any builds.
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#23
GAR
Honestly, next CPU of mine will be the 10 core Ryzen 2800X
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#24
wolar
Gigabyte's motherboards are subpar - even their "high end" - for a really long time and they do not seem to get better at all,
i just advice friends to avoid them altogether.
Posted on Reply
#25
R-T-B
wolar, post: 3924492, member: 147350"
Gigabyte's motherboards are subpar - even their "high end" - for a really long time and they do not seem to get better at all,
i just advice friends to avoid them altogether.
Their bios is certainly somewhat poor. Some of their upper tier motherboards are actually the best in the VRM department though, so I would not call them "subpar" there.
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