Sunday, December 3rd 2017

Intel "Glacier Falls" Platform Likely Gets a Computex Unveil, Also B365 Chipset

Intel's 9th generation re-branding of its "Skylake-X Refresh" HEDT processors could have a rather short lifespan in the company's product-stack of just three quarters. Intel is planning to launch its next HEDT platform, codenamed "Glacier Falls," which succeeds the current "Basin Falls Refresh." "Glacier Falls" could launch around late-Q2/early-Q3, with unveils slated for Computex 2019 (June). These details are part of a slide leak from an internal presentation from motherboard manufacturer GIGABYTE.

The slide revealing "Glacier Falls" also mentions two new mainstream-desktop platform chipsets, the B365 Express and the H310C Express. There is no information on what sets these apart from the current B360 and H310, respectively. We predict their entry is necessitated by stronger CPU VRM requirements to support 9th generation Core 6-core and 8-core processor SKUs that are known to pull up to 140 Watts of power (unrelated to TDP, which is calculated on the basis of nominal clock speed and not Turbo Boost). There's also a faint possibility of Intel giving the B365 CPU overclocking support to compete with the value proposition of AMD's B450.
Source: Komachi Ensaka (Twitter)
Add your own comment

16 Comments on Intel "Glacier Falls" Platform Likely Gets a Computex Unveil, Also B365 Chipset

#1
lynx29
This is like those x299 mobos right? with no integrated gpu? hmm. if the cheapest Glacier Falls chip beats a 9900k I might go for it. prob around $699 guessing? will prob be my last silicon build ever so I intend to go all out, unl;ess 7nm AMD impresses me in benches, but eh... all the ram issues I had with 2700x... I'm not 100% confident in AMD just yet.
Posted on Reply
#2
silentbogo
btarunr said:
There is no information on what sets these apart from the current B360 and H310, respectively.
22nm for both. Otherwise - the same thing.
Posted on Reply
#3
lynx29
Ah, I don't know what HEDT means, lol welp nm

looks like Intel is drowning in their own mismanagement if it's 22nm... looks like 7nm AMD CPU and GPU in winter 2019 is my next and final silicon build after all, I am tired of waiting around
Posted on Reply
#4
ShurikN
lynx29 said:
Ah, I don't know what HEDT means, lol welp nm

looks like Intel is drowning in their own mismanagement if it's 22nm... looks like 7nm AMD CPU and GPU in winter 2019 is my next and final silicon build after all, I am tired of waiting around
22nm is for the chipset not the CPUs. It's perfectly fine to make those on inferior nodes.
Posted on Reply
#5
silentbogo
lynx29 said:
looks like Intel is drowning in their own mismanagement if it's 22nm...
It's a PCH, dude, not a CPU. Fun fact - AMD is on 55nm.
Posted on Reply
#6
lynx29
silentbogo said:
It's a PCH, dude, not a CPU. Fun fact - AMD is on 55nm.
oh wow, hmm I might do this then as long benches and price line up at the right time for me
Posted on Reply
#7
lexluthermiester
ShurikN said:
22nm is for the chipset not the CPUs. It's perfectly fine to make those on inferior nodes.
Smaller, not inferior..

silentbogo said:
Fun fact - AMD is on 55nm.
Last time it was discussed, it was 32nm. Could be wrong though.
Posted on Reply
#8
silentbogo
lexluthermiester said:
Last time it was discussed, it was 32nm. Could be wrong though.
Nope, last time I said that AsMedia has moved to 32nm fab not too long ago, but so far the only products on this node are SATA/USB controllers and display interface ICs.
Older AMD chipsets (AM3 and FM2[+]) were made by Global Foundries on 32nm too.
Not sure about the upcoming 300500-series from AMD. Could be 32nm.
Posted on Reply
#10
B-Real
lynx29 said:
This is like those x299 mobos right? with no integrated gpu? hmm. if the cheapest Glacier Falls chip beats a 9900k I might go for it. prob around $699 guessing? will prob be my last silicon build ever so I intend to go all out, unl;ess 7nm AMD impresses me in benches, but eh... all the ram issues I had with 2700x... I'm not 100% confident in AMD just yet.
LOL. You must be the most unlucky person in the world. Memory issues?

Don't be the enemy of your own wallet. Probably for 700$, really? :D
Posted on Reply
#11
Vayra86
lynx29 said:
This is like those x299 mobos right? with no integrated gpu? hmm. if the cheapest Glacier Falls chip beats a 9900k I might go for it. prob around $699 guessing? will prob be my last silicon build ever so I intend to go all out, unl;ess 7nm AMD impresses me in benches, but eh... all the ram issues I had with 2700x... I'm not 100% confident in AMD just yet.
Why though? Just so you don't have an IGP for when your dedicated GPU says poof?

There are no clockspeed or platform advantages to be had for gaming on HEDT... These CPUs don't run better because they lack one. All you get is paying premium for a different segment without extracting any advantage out of it. Quad channel RAM, more PCIE lanes, etc. It has no use except for them warm fuzzy HEDT feels, or something :D

Higher core counts always cost clock speeds, in one way or another. Coffee Lake dodges that bullet by just running hot. Very hot. Even under solder. Glacier won't be running less hot doing 5 Ghz because they say its a Glacier ;)

Patience, young gwasshoppa...
Posted on Reply
#12
phanbuey
Vayra86 said:
Why though? Just so you don't have an IGP for when your dedicated GPU says poof?

There are no clockspeed or platform advantages to be had for gaming on HEDT... These CPUs don't run better because they lack one. All you get is paying premium for a different segment without extracting any advantage out of it. Quad channel RAM, more PCIE lanes, etc. It has no use except for them warm fuzzy HEDT feels, or something :D

Higher core counts always cost clock speeds, in one way or another. Coffee Lake dodges that bullet by just running hot. Very hot. Even under solder. Glacier won't be running less hot doing 5 Ghz because they say its a Glacier ;)

Patience, young gwasshoppa...
That's why it's called Glacier Falls, which is what happens when a glacier evaporates and then re-condenses in the atmosphere.
Posted on Reply
#13
R0H1T
silentbogo said:
Nope, last time I said that AsMedia has moved to 32nm fab not too long ago, but so far the only products on this node are SATA/USB controllers and display interface ICs.
Older AMD chipsets (AM3 and FM2[+]) were made by Global Foundries on 32nm too.
Not sure about the upcoming 300-series from AMD. Could be 32nm.
x370 was on 55nm, the node for latest gen's not been confirmed (officially) AFAIK, though the slides at launch said that there's some power savings ~
https://www.anandtech.com/show/12233/amd-tech-day-at-ces-2018-roadmap-revealed-with-ryzen-apus-zen-on-12nm-vega-on-7nm/8
Posted on Reply
#14
silentbogo
R0H1T said:
x370 was on 55nm, the node for latest gen's not been confirmed (officially) AFAIK, though the slides at launch said that there's some power savings ~
My bad, I meant to say "upcoming 500-series", cause the latest flood of new chipsets and parts even makes me very confused. Fixed my post.
400-series was also 55nm, as far as I know. I think the only difference between x470 and x370 is that AsMedia figured out the kink in their initial design, which caused those chips to run hot and fail on rare occasions. That's very typical for AsMedia.
I'm hoping that at some point in the future AMD will drop their partnership with AsMedia, and either outsourced everything to Renesas or went back to designing their own chipsets.
Posted on Reply
#15
efikkan
We still know very little about Intel's upcoming Cooper Lake-S, other than it sharing the platform with Ice Lake-S and it should bring "architectural improvements".

Vayra86 said:

There are no clockspeed or platform advantages to be had for gaming on HEDT... These CPUs don't run better because they lack one. All you get is paying premium for a different segment without extracting any advantage out of it. Quad channel RAM, more PCIE lanes, etc. It has no use except for them warm fuzzy HEDT feels, or something :D
There is certainly an overlap between mainstream and HEDT where you can question the usefulness of HEDT, but it all comes down to usage. For purely gaming, a good 6-core is more than plenty, unless you're doing dual streams. I would argue that Intel's 8- and perhaps 10-core HEDT CPUs doesn't deserve to exist, I would start the HEDT lineup on 12 cores.

But HEDT have a number of advantages, not only a wide selection of core configurations, also memory bandwidth, PCIe lanes, more efficient cache, AVX-512 and dual FMAs, better featured chipsets, etc. which do have significant benefits for various workloads, including heavy encoding, CAD, modeling, programming, VMs etc. These do have little to no benefit for gaming though, but Intel's HEDT lineup have the benefit over Threadripper of being good enough for gaming, making them an excellent choice for (semi-)professionals who also want to do some gaming.

My largest annoyance with HEDT is the overlap between i7/i9 and Xeon-W. In my opinion these platforms should be merged.
Posted on Reply
#16
lexluthermiester
efikkan said:
My largest annoyance with HEDT is the overlap between i7/i9 and Xeon-W. In my opinion these platforms should be merged.
Gotta disagree with this. Intel bin's them out for many reasons. Things are fine the way they are.
Posted on Reply
Add your own comment