Monday, January 7th 2019

NVIDIA G-SYNC now Supports FreeSync/VESA Adaptive-Sync Technology

NVIDIA finally got around to realizing that the number of monitors with VESA adaptive-sync overwhelmingly outnumber those supporting NVIDIA G-Sync, and is going ahead with adding support for adaptive-sync monitors. This however, comes with a big rider. NVIDIA is not immediately going to unlock adaptive-sync to all monitors, just the ones it has tested and found to work "perfectly" with their hardware. NVIDIA announced that it has found a handful of the 550+ monitor models in the market that support adaptive-sync, and has enabled support to them. Over time, as it tests more monitors, support for these monitors will be added through GeForce driver updates, as a "certified" monitor.

At their CES event, the company provided a list of monitors that they already tested and that fulfill all requirements. G-Sync support for these models from Acer, ASUS, AOC, Agon and BenQ will be automatically enabled with a driver update on January 15th.

Update: We received word from NVIDIA that you can manually enable G-SYNC on all Adaptive-Sync monitors, even non-certified ones: "For gamers who have monitors that we have not yet tested, or that have failed validation, we'll give you an option to manually enable VRR, too."

Update 2: NVIDIA released these new Adaptive-Sync capable drivers, we tested G-SYNC on a FreeSync monitor.
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228 Comments on NVIDIA G-SYNC now Supports FreeSync/VESA Adaptive-Sync Technology

#26
lynx29
SIGSEGV said:
enlighten me pls ;-)
Google it.
Posted on Reply
#27
Fatalfury
R0H1T said:
Is that so, must be why RTX cards are now gonna fly off the shelves oh wait :rolleyes:
it will. Once RTX 2060 & rtx 2050 ti are on the shelves.
Posted on Reply
#28
Mistral
Fatalfury said:
So its all over for AMD...
The only advantage AMD had ..........aaaandd its ..........Gone!!!
By the same level of logic, with this nVidia practically admits that it's been ripping clients off for years.

Fatalfury said:
it will. Once RTX 2060 & rtx 2050 ti are on the shelves.
Can't wait for all the RTX enabled games that an RTX 2050 will be able to run...
Posted on Reply
#29
FordGT90Concept
"I go fast!1!11!1!"
Looks like NVIDIA finally pulled their head out of their ass. I suspect their stock price tumbling had something to do with it.

NVIDIA says FreeSync may not 100% work with G-Sync and this statement is true because drivers have to be optimized for it to work right on most monitors. NVIDIA's drivers naturally lack the optimizations AMD did so...support is iffy...but if you have an NVIDIA card and a FreeSync monitor, no harm in trying it but your mileage will vary.
Posted on Reply
#30
john_
Well, this is something really positive. Unfortunately that "GSync compatible" logo, will drive prices up. Nvidia found a way, not only to make money, but also to narrow the price difference between good FreeSync monitors and Nvidia monitors. I only hope manufacturers keep two monitors in the market. One with the Nvidia Gsync compatible badge and the higher price to cover Nvidia's royalties and one at the same quality standards, only FreeSync logo and the correct, lower, price.
Posted on Reply
#31
FordGT90Concept
"I go fast!1!11!1!"
GSync compatible should be offered at no additional cost like FreeSync compatible is.
Posted on Reply
#32
beautyless
Glad, so now I'm willing to buy NVidia graphic.
Posted on Reply
#34
john_
FordGT90Concept said:
GSync compatible should be offered at no additional cost like FreeSync compatible is.
It's Nvidia. It will have a cost. And manufacturers will be willing to pay that extra cost, because it will be an extra assurance to the buyer that, not only this monitor is compatible with their card, but also that it offers top quality.
Posted on Reply
#35
Vayra86
OneMoar said:
HOLY SHIT I know it winter but did hell freeze over ?
The moment Intel announced they were going dedicated GPU and supporting VESA adaptive sync, I kinda knew this was going to happen.

In fact, ever since FreeSync got launched people said it would happen at some point.

john_ said:
It's Nvidia. It will have a cost. And manufacturers will be willing to pay that extra cost, because it will be an extra assurance to the buyer that, not only this monitor is compatible with their card, but also that it offers top quality.
No, they are certifying and testing older monitors mostly. Its as much free as FreeSync is. And the article says they will also enable the option on non-certified FreeSync monitors...
Posted on Reply
#36
londiste
Candor said:
400 tested and 12 passed?
I'm not sure what to think about this.
Nvidia is trying to maintain some type of minimum acceptable quality on these. I am willing to bet they will only go after anything that has LFC support.
They are not in a rush and probably will slowly go over potential candidates for GSync Compatible status over time.
The monitors from the announcement are not new and some of these are from years ago so this will not be just new monitors that have a chance.

Ths lists for both manufacturers are:
- https://www.nvidia.com/en-us/geforce/products/g-sync-monitors/specs/ - 62 GSync monitors plus 12 GSync Compatible from the announcement.
- https://www.amd.com/en/products/freesync-monitors - 568 FreeSync monitors

Looking closer a the FreeSync monitors - filtering by LFC Yes will cut the list down to 330. And there is a lot of bullshit spec monitors listed. 48-75 Hz is not a valid LFC range, not even with the newer reduced AMD spec that has proven to be problematic. Original was FreeSync range at 2.5x, updated one is 2.0x (that AMD acknowledges in some places but not others).
Among these FreeSync monitors with LFC there are 40 with DisplayPort input, 118 with HDMI input and 172 with both. Unknown if Nvidia will be able to support FreeSync over HDMI but they probably will not even if they can, at least not officially - note the DisplayPort Adaptive Sync messaging all over the announcement.
- out of 40 monitors with DisplayPort are all proper LFC support
- out of 172 monitors with both inputs almost all are OK by spec, 11 (17 by HDMI input) are in the likely problematic 2.0-2.5 range.
- out of 118 monitors with HDMI support only 8 have LFC support.

Altogether 201 potential suspects for Nvidia to potentially make GSync Compatible.
That is honestly less than I expected.
Posted on Reply
#37
OneMoar
There is Always Moar
unless your framerates have wild swings really gsync does you no good over VESA adaptive sync/freesync especially at <85hz
I expected this to happen _eventually_ but this is kind of out of left field
Posted on Reply
#38
Vayra86
I'm quietly laughing as well at all those people paying premium on Gsync right now... especially those I've warned not to that did it anyway :)

Fatalfury said:
it will. Once RTX 2060 & rtx 2050 ti are on the shelves.
At 360-370 EUR a pop... yeah right :D
Posted on Reply
#39
stimpy88
A customer friendly move from nGreedia... A customer backlash, and VESA calling time on your tricks can really be a good thing, aye? Now try and drop those insane prices, and you might have a serious PR win on your hands.

I'm in the market for a new monitor, and was looking at a G-Sync monitor, but did not care much for paying the nGreedia tax... I wonder if we will see a drop in the price of these monitors, before G-Sync is completely gone from the market?

So, thank you AMD, for successfully lobbying VESA to include support variable refresh rates in it's standards, nGreedia must really hate you right about now...

sam_86314 said:
Perfect timing, since I just got a QHD 144Hz FreeSync monitor.

Makes me wonder how no one figured out how to force FreeSync support on Nvidia cards since it was just a software switch.
It was blocked in the nGreedia driver.
Posted on Reply
#40
ZoneDymo
Fatalfury said:
So its all over for AMD...
The only advantage AMD had ..........aaaandd its ..........Gone!!!
obvious troll comment, still there is one other advantage, and that is that AMD is AMD and not Nvidia, which is a plus in my book.
Posted on Reply
#41
stimpy88
john_ said:
Well, this is something really positive. Unfortunately that "GSync compatible" logo, will drive prices up. Nvidia found a way, not only to make money, but also to narrow the price difference between good FreeSync monitors and Nvidia monitors. I only hope manufacturers keep two monitors in the market. One with the Nvidia Gsync compatible badge and the higher price to cover Nvidia's royalties and one at the same quality standards, only FreeSync logo and the correct, lower, price.
I'm not really sure what your saying here? Are you actually saying that you still want to pay more money for a logo on a monitor that performs exactly the same function as one without the logo, and $100-$200 cheaper? You do realise that G-Sync is now doing exactly the same job, just with the nGreedia chip and it's royalties enabling/allowing variable refresh rate support in the nGreedia driver? The writing was on the wall for Greed-Sync ever since AMD successfully lobbied VESA to include it as a standard in the latest DisplayPort specifications... A fool and his money, and all that...

Any logical/sane person would be thanking AMD for saving them hundreds of dollars, and removing a false, proprietary "standard" from the market, that only still exists due to greed. It just would not have been possible for nGreedia to have kept G-Sync going after DisplayPort 1.4 and HDMI 2.1 were released, which has happened, and monitors are already for sale on the market. You also have to remember that the monitor manufacturers also have to pay nGreedia for that shiny G-Sync logo, so why should they, and why should I, when it literally does nothing on the latest tech?
Posted on Reply
#42
Metroid
I have a Samsung 28 inch ue590 freesynch compatible and it is not on nvidia compatible monitors, matter of fact only 12 monitors from 400 tested, what a bull is that?

That is a way of saying, "hey we support freesynch but only the monitors we have got some money back from manufactures we have chosen so.
Posted on Reply
#43
john_
Vayra86 said:
No, they are certifying and testing older monitors mostly. Its as much free as FreeSync is. And the article says they will also enable the option on non-certified FreeSync monitors...
It's in Nvidia's best interest to offer it with a cost. It will make them money and I bet they think they diserve that money being those who brought Adaptive Sync to PCs and also will narrow somehow the price difference between top FreeSync monitors and GSync monitors. And again, this is Nvidia. They never lose the chance to make money. Of course we disagree, but that's just my opinion. Manufacturers on the other hand will gladly pay a small amount if that can move their models to the top of the list of possible monirtors to buy, that Nvidia owners have in their minds.
stimpy88 said:
Are you actually saying that you still want to pay more money for a logo on a monitor that performs exactly the same function as one without the logo, and $100-$200 cheaper?
Never said that.
Posted on Reply
#44
kieguru
Fatalfury said:
So its all over for AMD...
The only advantage AMD had ..........aaaandd its ..........Gone!!!
Not really, I'd say AMD's biggest advantage currently is pricing. I've seen an RX 570 for £130 new, fantastic price for 1080p with pretty close, if not the same scores as a 3gb 1060 @ £200.
Posted on Reply
#45
BigDaddy_Jeff
Acer XFA240 and Acer XF240H is the same monitor right? I did the research and the spec is exactly the same.

FYI, i owned the XF240H
Posted on Reply
#46
londiste
Metroid said:
I have a Samsung 28 inch ue590 freesynch compatible and it is not on nvidia compatible monitors, matter of fact only 12 monitors from 400 tested, what a bull is that?

That is a way of saying, "hey we support freesynch but only the monitors we have got some money back from manufactures we have chosen so.
U28E590D? Freesync range 40-60Hz. Sorry but when we look at variable refresh rate, this is a bullshit monitor. Samsung added FreeSync on this just for the nice logo and so they could say it supports it.
Posted on Reply
#47
FordGT90Concept
"I go fast!1!11!1!"
londiste said:
Nvidia is trying to maintain some type of minimum acceptable quality on these. I am willing to bet they will only go after anything that has LFC support.
They are not in a rush and probably will slowly go over potential candidates for GSync Compatible status over time.
The monitors from the announcement are not new and some of these are from years ago so this will not be just new monitors that have a chance.

Ths lists for both manufacturers are:
- https://www.nvidia.com/en-us/geforce/products/g-sync-monitors/specs/ - 62 GSync monitors plus 12 GSync Compatible from the announcement.
- https://www.amd.com/en/products/freesync-monitors - 568 FreeSync monitors

Looking closer a the FreeSync monitors - filtering by LFC Yes will cut the list down to 330. And there is a lot of bullshit spec monitors listed. 48-75 Hz is not a valid LFC range, not even with the newer reduced AMD spec that has proven to be problematic. Original was FreeSync range at 2.5x, updated one is 2.0x (that AMD acknowledges in some places but not others).
Among these FreeSync monitors with LFC there are 40 with DisplayPort input, 118 with HDMI input and 172 with both. Unknown if Nvidia will be able to support FreeSync over HDMI but they probably will not even if they can, at least not officially - note the DisplayPort Adaptive Sync messaging all over the announcement.
- out of 40 monitors with DisplayPort are all proper LFC support
- out of 172 monitors with both inputs almost all are OK by spec, 11 (17 by HDMI input) are in the likely problematic 2.0-2.5 range.
- out of 118 monitors with HDMI support only 8 have LFC support.

Altogether 201 potential suspects for Nvidia to potentially make GSync Compatible.
That is honestly less than I expected.
LFC has nothing to do with it. Most likely NVIDIA phoned FreeSync monitor manufacturers and asked them to send whatever monitors they're willing to send for apative sync compatability testing and those manufacturers only sent 12 monitors. These are likely all relatively new monitors that the manufacturer is still producing so getting it Gsync compatibility tested gives them another selling point against the competition.

stimpy88 said:
I wonder if we will see a drop in the price of these monitors, before G-Sync is completely gone from the market?
Not likely unless NVIDIA is abandoning G-Sync modules altogether. G-Sync modules do have technical advantages over VESA VRR so they will likely be able to sell the remaining stock at MSRP even with VESA VRR options available.

stimpy88 said:
So, thank you AMD, for successfully lobbying VESA to include support variable refresh rates in it's standards, nGreedia must really hate you right about now...
NVIDIA is a VESA member too. I wouldn't be surprised if they were supportive of the adaptive sync standard knowing how pathetic G-Sync monitor sales were. Their hardware didn't support VRR until now because they were trying to recoup R&D costs. They knew it would eventually happen though--especially where TVs are concerned.

londiste said:
U28E590D? Freesync range 40-60Hz. Sorry but when we look at variable refresh rate, this is a bullshit monitor. Samsung added FreeSync on this just for the nice logo and so they could say it supports it.
4K is difficult to drive for video cards and, if you do some searching, there's a lot of non-LFC 4K monitors out there with 30~60 Hz range because GPUs can solidly deliver that range at 4K. Manufacturers wouldn't bother certifying it if there wasn't any demand for it.
Posted on Reply
#48
renz496
ShurikN said:
You do know I'm talkin about proprietary hardware, right?
And if by all the time you mean a handful of games, then sure...
lol handful of games? the market share between PhysX and Havok is pretty much even right now with slight edge towards havok. that is not handful.
Posted on Reply
#49
stimpy88
john_ said:
Never said that.
OK, but what does this mean then...?
"I only hope manufacturers keep two monitors in the market. One with the Nvidia Gsync compatible badge and the higher price to cover Nvidia's royalties and one at the same quality standards, only FreeSync logo and the correct, lower, price."

Are you saying that you want people "confused" in to spending more money for a badge that is totally meaningless on the latest monitors? If not, then I simply do not understand what you are trying to say?
Posted on Reply
#50
Vayra86
john_ said:
It's in Nvidia's best interest to offer it with a cost. It will make them money and I bet they think they diserve that money being those who brought Adaptive Sync to PCs and also will narrow somehow the price difference between top FreeSync monitors and GSync monitors. And again, this is Nvidia. They never lose the chance to make money. Of course we disagree, but that's just my opinion. Manufacturers on the other hand will gladly pay a small amount if that can move their models to the top of the list of possible monirtors to buy, that Nvidia owners have in their minds.
You can think whatever you prefer to think, but please just read the damn article because it says existing monitors have been certified. Do you really believe those will now get a price increase pushed by Nvidia? You realize that would hit the FreeSync part of the deal as well?

You're not making any sense.
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