Monday, February 11th 2019

Palit and EVGA GeForce GTX 1660 Ti Cards Pictured

As we inch closer to the supposed 15th February launch of the GeForce GTX 1660 Ti, pictures of more AIC partner branded custom-design cards. The first two of these are from Palit and EVGA. Palit is bringing two very compact cards to the table under its StormX banner. These cards appear to be under 18 cm in length, and use an aluminium fin-stack cooler that's ventilated by a single 100 mm fan. There are two grades based on factory-overclock. The base model ticks at 1770 MHz boost, while the OC variant offers 1815 MHz boost.

EVGA's GTX 1660 Ti lineup includes two cards under its XC brand, with both cards being under 20 cm in length, but are 3 slots thick. Both cards appear to be using the same 3-slot single-fan cooling solution as the company's RTX 2060 XC. Once again, we see two variants based on clock-speeds, with the "Black" variant sticking to 1770 MHz boost, and the XC version slightly dialing up that frequency. Based on the 12 nm "TU116" silicon, the GTX 1660 Ti is rumored to feature 1,536 CUDA cores based on the "Turing" architecture, but lacking in RTX technology. The SKU succeeds the GTX 1060 6 GB.
Sources: VideoCardz 1, 2
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10 Comments on Palit and EVGA GeForce GTX 1660 Ti Cards Pictured

#1
lexluthermiester
Now we know they're real. Benchmark testing should be incoming soon.
Posted on Reply
#2
neatfeatguy
lexluthermiester said:
Now we know they're real. Benchmark testing should be incoming soon.
fixed!
Posted on Reply
#3
bonehead123
lexluthermiester said:
Now we know they're real
But.... are they really real, or are they just some really slick CAD renders of what they want you to think you are really seeing via some really new, slick image-tag code inserted into the internets for our viewing pleasure ???

thinky 'bout it :D
Posted on Reply
#4
Manu_PT
bonehead123 said:
But.... are they really real, or are they just some really slick CAD renders of what they want you to think you are really seeing via some really new, slick image-tag code inserted into the internets for our viewing pleasure ???

thinky 'bout it :D
Lost the plot xD
Posted on Reply
#6
bug
Anyone else agrees a three slot solution has no place on a mid-range card?
For me it's enough to cross those models off my list when shopping for a 2060 (and I'm not paying the asking price for EVGA's top-tier, two slot card).
Posted on Reply
#7
Assimilator
bug said:
Anyone else agrees a three slot solution has no place on a mid-range card?
For me it's enough to cross those models off my list when shopping for a 2060 (and I'm not paying the asking price for EVGA's top-tier, two slot card).
There are some constraints that PC chassis manufacturers cannot ignore, regardless of how compact their designs are, and one of them is the ATX format. Most people buying these cards will have either full ATX or mATX motherboards, and no other expansion cards, which means a 3-slot-wide card is more likely to fit in their systems than a 30-cm-long card will. So this is IMO a smart move by EVGA.
Posted on Reply
#8
lexluthermiester
Assimilator said:
There are some constraints that PC chassis manufacturers cannot ignore, regardless of how compact their designs are, and one of them is the ATX format. Most people buying these cards will have either full ATX or mATX motherboards, and no other expansion cards, which means a 3-slot-wide card is more likely to fit in their systems than a 30-cm-long card will. So this is IMO a smart move by EVGA.
This is true to a point, however there are many that do have cards like sound cards, capture cards, bootable storage cards, etc. and a three slot coolers would greatly limit those options.
Posted on Reply
#9
Chloe Price
I wouldn't mind that it uses three slots. Though would be just useless since I'd put a waterblock on it.
Posted on Reply
#10
bug
Assimilator said:
There are some constraints that PC chassis manufacturers cannot ignore, regardless of how compact their designs are, and one of them is the ATX format. Most people buying these cards will have either full ATX or mATX motherboards, and no other expansion cards, which means a 3-slot-wide card is more likely to fit in their systems than a 30-cm-long card will. So this is IMO a smart move by EVGA.
Maybe so, but every other 2060 compact design is a 2 slot solution.
Posted on Reply