Tuesday, February 26th 2019

Thermalright HR-22 Plus Black Heatsink Pictured

Thermaltake is ready with an all-black version of the HR-22 Plus CPU heatsink. This monstrosity, pictured next to a 350 ml soda can for scale, can handle processors with up to 65 W TDP without needing a fan, and over 200 W with up to two 120 mm fans mounted in push-pull fashion. The black variant features anodized aluminium fins and nickel-plated copper fins. The fin-stack consists of 35 large indented and punched fins through which eight 6 mm-thick copper heat pipes pass, which indirectly pull heat from a nickel-plated copper base. Measuring 150 mm x 120 mm x 159 mm (LxWxH), the heatsink alone weighs 1.12 kg. The company didn't reveal pricing or availability, but apparently this variant is available in China.
Sources: Jobx (ChipHell forums), FanlessTech
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29 Comments on Thermalright HR-22 Plus Black Heatsink Pictured

#1
lynx29
I have been waiting over a year for the NH-D15 Noctua to be in all black, but no luck. No news either. Sucks.
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#2
Xzibit
Whats with the fan arrangement in the Fractal Case.
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#3
eidairaman1
The Exiled Airman
It's Thermalright, not thermaltake @btarunr
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#4
lynx29
lets get a temp review soon, that thing looks beast. EK Vardar fan on that baby, see what she can do ^^
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#5
Zodiaq22
It looks cool but LGA775 support in 2019? Why ?...
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#6
GloryToYou
Visually, it kooks like a le grande macho. How is it different?

Edit: It has the exact same dimensions as a le grande macho.
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#7
cucker tarlson
GloryToYou said:
Visually, it kooks like a le grande macho. How is it different?

Edit: It has the exact same dimensions as a le grande macho.
I think it's all black. Cause releasing a different color of the same thing is news now.
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#8
xvi
Some quick googling found an article from 2018:
The company didn’t reveal pricing or availability, but apparently this variant is available in China.
Another found the silver version available for in China for 699 Yuan (~$104.46 USD?).

Skimming old reviews, they seem to say something along the lines of "Outperformed by much cheaper coolers, but it looks cool"
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#9
Topforum
GloryToYou said:
Visually, it kooks like a le grande macho. How is it different?

Edit: It has the exact same dimensions as a le grande macho.
Le Grand Macho has 7 heat pipes.
This one has 8 heat pipes.
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#10
SetsunaFZero
Zodiaq22 said:
It looks cool but LGA775 support in 2019? Why ?...
one Mount plate can support 775/115X because the mounting holes spacing isn't much different
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#11
londiste
lynx29 said:
lets get a temp review soon, that thing looks beast. EK Vardar fan on that baby, see what she can do ^^
xvi said:
Skimming old reviews, they seem to say something along the lines of "Outperformed by much cheaper coolers, but it looks cool"
Compared to denser heatsinks at higher fan speeds it will lose but it is not the goal. The point of this cooler is efficiency at low airflow. Considerable area and large gaps between fins/plates. At the same time this arrangement does not scale well with a lot of airflow - high fan speeds. This heatsink is at its best fitted with a low-speed quiet fan - at 300-500 rpm its cooling capabilities are impressive.
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#12
kastriot
It will be interesting in +10 years from now to see 3-5nm chiplets with 32-256-512? cores with low freq 1-3GHz and passive cooling.
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#13
las
Hmm, I'm worried about RAM clearance.
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#14
Chloe Price
las said:
Hmm, I'm worried about RAM clearance.
See where the base is? RAM clearance would maybe cause a problem with only quad channel rigs.
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#15
Valantar
londiste said:
Compared to denser heatsinks at higher fan speeds it will lose but it is not the goal. The point of this cooler is efficiency at low airflow. Considerable area and large gaps between fins/plates. At the same time this arrangement does not scale well with a lot of airflow - high fan speeds. This heatsink is at its best fitted with a low-speed quiet fan - at 300-500 rpm its cooling capabilities are impressive.
Yeah, that fin spacing is definitely not meant for a high-speed fan setup - nor the fact that its sides are open. While it's probably entirely possible to run a NH-D15 passive on a 65W CPU, the question becomes how quickly heat soak sets in and things start getting hot - which is where large air gaps in between fins promote convection cooling and keep heat soak at bay. If this was meant for balls-to-the-wall cooling with fast fans, the design would need both more (denser) fins and closed-off sides to ensure the air isn't simply dissipating out the sides of the heatsink.

Different solutions for different uses. IMO, this is quite interesting, as 65W CPUs these days are quite impressive.
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#16
natr0n
You made a mistake not thermaltake it's thermalright.
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#17
zo0lykas
It's a joke? 8 pipes on each side, over 1kg beast, and only 200w?
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#18
notb
Zodiaq22 said:
It looks cool but LGA775 support in 2019? Why ?...
HR-22 was released in 2013. LGA775 was still pretty popular back then.
zo0lykas said:
It's a joke? 8 pipes on each side, over 1kg beast, and only 200w?
This heatsink is sold without fans, so they don't tell you what max TDP it can handle (other than the 65W in passively cooled systems).
They can only tell you that if you provide a decent airflow (they mention a 120mm fan) it'll be fine for at least 200W.
And the more airflow you provide, the more heat it can dissipate, obviously.

I've seen people pairing 100W CPUs with a HR-02 (basically 3/4 of HR-22) and just strong, directed airflow in a case (without any fans on the heatsink itself)
kastriot said:
It will be interesting in +10 years from now to see 3-5nm chiplets with 32-256-512? cores with low freq 1-3GHz and passive cooling.
You can build a 256-core ARM cluster today. Why wait until x86 CPUs become so slow? Let's hope they don't. :)
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#19
Valantar
zo0lykas said:
It's a joke? 8 pipes on each side, over 1kg beast, and only 200w?
Look at the number of fins. The Be Quiet Dark Rock 4 has 51 fins in the same height, that's nearly 50% more. Number of fins = area available to dissipate heat, which is directly proportional to cooling capacity. The difference is that the DR4 includes a fan and is optimised for use with a fan; this is optimised for passive cooling/indirect airflow, hence the larger gaps between the fins. The denser the fins, the more restriction to airflow, after all.
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#20
notb
Valantar said:
Look at the number of fins. The Be Quiet Dark Rock 4 has 51 fins in the same height, that's nearly 50% more. Number of fins = area available to dissipate heat, which is directly proportional to cooling capacity. The difference is that the DR4 includes a fan and is optimised for use with a fan; this is optimised for passive cooling/indirect airflow, hence the larger gaps between the fins. The denser the fins, the more restriction to airflow, after all.
Exactly. A heatsink with dense fins will trap hot air inside (bad passive cooling) and block incoming airflow.
If someone has a dense heatsink, I suggest blowing on it at the next occasion. Hardly anything will go through.

CM 212 is universally praised for excellent performance. No magic there. It has 57 fins. It's one of the most dense consumer heatsinks you can find today. But it needs a fairly strong airflow to work.
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#21
bonehead123
notb said:
CM 212 is universally praised for excellent performance. No magic there. It has 57 fins. It's one of the most dense consumer heatsinks you can find today. But it needs a fairly strong airflow to work.
Tru dat :)

I used a 212 years ago, fitted with 2 Corsair AF120's, neveranottaproblemo.... it kept my 4790K/4GHZ running at a steady 38c no matter what task I threw at it.

The only reasons I changed to AIO liquid cooler was for asthetic reasons (I grew tired of looking at the huge hunk of fins), and I built a rig in a huge case (TT900) that demanded something different...
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#22
Wavetrex
Sneaky Pepsi ad :laugh:

But no, massive air coolers are a thing of the past. If one needs more than normal TDP, they should go with water.
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#23
Valantar
Wavetrex said:
Sneaky Pepsi ad :laugh:

But no, massive air coolers are a thing of the past. If one needs more than normal TDP, they should go with water.
After recently replacing the AIO (Enermax LiqTech TR4) on my partner's workstation due to it clogging entirely within a year, I beg to differ. And that's coming from someone with a full custom loop in their main PC. I agree that most large air coolers are a bit silly (I'm of the opinion that motherboards larger than ITX are useless for >80% of PC builders), but they definitely have their use. And there are plenty of bad AIOs out there. Of course, not everyone mixes metals like Enermax does, and some have more effective anti-corrosion additives, but in general, AIOs are ... not ideal. Sure, lots of good ones, but I really came to appreciate the practicality of a big air cooler after the hassle of that failed AIO. Easy to mount, fewer possible points of failure, and far more quiet. That Enermax cooler had a lot more cooling capability than the U14S that's currently living in that workstation, but that doesn't help much when it clogs, forcing all 12 cores to throttle to 500MHz to avoid thermal shutdown.

In a well-designed case, this could do an excellent job keeping a normal CPU cool entirely passively, and it's not even that big. That's not bad.
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#24
Wavetrex
So because one OEM made some bad design decisions, you conclude that AIO's are bad. Kappa.

Valantar said:
and far more quiet.
So one single 12cm fan spinning at insane speeds under load is quieter than 2x14cm spinning at moderate to low speeds?

Again, you have a sample of one, which you had bad luck with. Noisy, clogging, etc.

I'll put my sample of one on the other side of the balance: Corsair H115, which is whisper quiet (I can't even hear the pump at all), cools well, had no issue whatsoever in almost 3 years of 24/7 operation.
Also provides airflow to the case, as it's front mounted, reducing the need for yet more fans.
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#25
bonehead123
Wavetrex said:
So because one OEM made some bad design decisions, you conclude that AIO's are bad. Kappa.


So one single 12cm fan spinning at insane speeds under load is quieter than 2x14cm spinning at moderate to low speeds?

Again, you have a sample of one, which you had bad luck with. Noisy, clogging, etc.

I'll put my sample of one on the other side of the balance: Corsair H115, which is whisper quiet (I can't even hear the pump at all), cools well, had no issue whatsoever in almost 3 years of 24/7 operation.
Also provides airflow to the case, as it's front mounted, reducing the need for yet more fans.
I will add my sample of 1 to yours, as I use the 115i also, and have not had any problems with it whatsoever in over 1.5 yrs of near constant use, and I bought it used, so it's been in service longer than that.

It did not come with fans, so I chose to equip it with 2x Corsair 140SP's as intakes and 2x 140AF's on the other side....all of which normally run at around 800-1000-ish rpms and are inaudible to me in my mostly soundproofed home office...

But my case is so big that even moderate airflow is enough for all but the most extreme setups, and I have my CPU, Ram, & GPU all overclocked...
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