Wednesday, November 13th 2019

AMD Radeon Pro 5000M Series Mobile GPUs Bring High-Performance AMD RDNA Architecture to Apple's New 16-inch MacBook Pro

AMD today announced that the latest Apple MacBook Pro features the new AMD Radeon Pro 5500M and 5300M mobile GPUs. AMD Radeon Pro 5000M series are the first 7 nm discrete mobile GPUs for professional users, leveraging industry-leading process technology and powerful AMD RDNA architecture to provide groundbreaking levels of graphics performance for video editing, 3D content creation and macOS-based game development.

AMD Radeon Pro 5000M series mobile GPUs are built upon the all-new AMD RDNA architecture, designed from the ground up for superior performance, scalability and power efficiency. The new GPUs include up to 8 GB of high-speed GDDR6 memory with up to 192 GB/s memory bandwidth - double the bandwidth of GDDR5 - and also deliver up to 4.0 TFLOPS of single-precision floating-point (FP32) performance. The GPUs are optimized for today's top professional content creation applications and compute-intensive image rendering workloads, delivering breathtaking, ultra-smooth, high-framerate visuals on the MacBook Pro Retina display.
"Today's high-end creative professionals want the freedom to bring their ideas to life in the office or on the road without technology getting in their way," said Scott Herkelman, corporate vice president and general manager, Radeon Technologies Group at AMD. "The Radeon Pro 5000M series GPUs provide MacBook Pro users with the horsepower and unmatched visual fidelity allowing them to focus on unleashing their creativity and delivering amazing results."

AMD Radeon Pro 5000M products join the AMD Radeon RX 5500 series graphics products announced in October 2019. AMD Radeon RX 5500M gaming GPUs and the new AMD Radeon RX 5300M gaming GPUs are expected to be available in systems from other notebook manufacturers this quarter.

For more information about the MacBook Pro visit www.apple.com/macbook-pro.
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42 Comments on AMD Radeon Pro 5000M Series Mobile GPUs Bring High-Performance AMD RDNA Architecture to Apple's New 16-inch MacBook Pro

#2
TheGuruStud
londiste
https://www.amd.com/en/graphics/radeon-apple-5000m-series
50W TDP but seems they had to make some concessions in clock speeds to fit in it:
- 5500M up to 1300MHz
- 5300M up to 1250MHz
I wonder how they won't spontaneously combust, anyway. Current models have the CPU dying from overheating. Who needs heatsinks and fans? Not apple!

It's all part of the master plan. Buy a $2k+ laptop and it fails in 1-2 yrs = you can buy another! This has been going on for several years, now. There's so many hardware defects. Even if it's under warranty, you're at fault and they tell you to buy a new one.
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#3
lynx29
TheGuruStud
I wonder how they won't spontaneously combust, anyway. Current models have the CPU dying from overheating. Who needs heatsinks and fans? Not apple!

It's all part of the master plan. Buy a $2k+ laptop and it fails in 1-2 yrs = you can buy another! This has been going on for several years, now. There's so many hardware defects. Even if it's under warranty, you're at fault and they tell you to buy a new one.
can confirm, laptops are a terrible investment. worst decision i ever made was my gtx 1070 laptop.
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#4
phanbuey
lynx29
can confirm, laptops are a terrible investment. worst decision i ever made was my gtx 1070 laptop.
Yeah for high performance it's a huge waste of money.

Better to have a laptop to go screw around and do light work in coffee shops and for business trips, and a big production / gaming machine at home that you can keep upgrading.

If you travel alot / in the military then a laptop might be the only choice -- even then I still think I would try and sneak a cheapo desktop.
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#5
lynx29
phanbuey
Yeah for high performance it's a huge waste of money.

Better to have a laptop to go screw around and do light work in coffee shops and for business trips, and a big production / gaming machine at home that you can keep upgrading.

If you travel alot / in the military then a laptop isn't a bad investment.
yep, I got the gtx 1070 laptop for grad school which lasted 2 years. but it just holds no re-sale value, especially mine since it overheats at stock bios lol
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#6
kapone32
One should never buy a laptop for gaming, The heat envelope for high end CPUs and GPUs will be affected by the lack of dissipation of heat. That is why I went with a AMD APU based laptop as it can game fine at 720P. As there is no Discrete GPU the heat envelope can be covered by a cooling fan tray.
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#7
lynx29
kapone32
One should never buy a laptop for gaming, The heat envelope for high end CPUs and GPUs will be affected by the lack of dissipation of heat. That is why I went with a AMD APU based laptop as it can game fine at 720P. As there is no Discrete GPU the heat envelope can be covered by a cooling fan tray.
oh my gaming laptop works great, with mods.

What I do is remove the back cover, place it directly on a 6 fan laptop cooler with a little tape so it doesn't slide. Then I set BIOS to no turbo boost on CPU, which doesn't really matter in most games anyway. I get around 70 celsius on both cpu and my gtx 1070 in all games, except witcher 3 which hits around 78 celsius, still not bad. I get 90 fps as well no issue as my laptop screen is overclocked to 90hz. honestly I like my laptop, but it's not exactly portable. I mean I can travel with it, then set up a permanent desk area. which worked great for me cause I travel periodically to visit friends for 1-2 months at a time, and grad school was back and forth and then breaks back and forth, etc. so I didn't need fully mobile anyway.

but yeah I would never do it again.

@R-T-B sure you don't want to buy my gtx 1070 laptop? I give you discount fren ;) three niner!
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#8
Khonjel
Desktops are like work trucks while laptops are like luxury cars.

Btw @R-T-B what's up with @lynx29 tagging you every post? You guys a couple or sth?
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#9
lynx29
Khonjel
Desktops are like work trucks while laptops are like luxury cars.

Btw @R-T-B what's up with @lynx29 tagging you every post? You guys a couple or sth?
I tagged him in like 4 posts my entire time on this site, what you smokin bro? He showed interest in buying my laptop in the past is all.
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#10
Cheeseball
Not sure about you guys, but my G5 5587 (i7 8750H & GTX 1060 Max-Q) has been doing pretty well. It was thermal throttling with earlier BIOS versions, but 1.09 to 1.11 addressed the slow fan speeds. I can play PUBG at competitive settings pushing 90 FPS. Borderlands 3 also runs pretty good with a mix of medium to high settings at 60 to 80 FPS.

I can't play any 3D games on battery though, but Visual Studio and MATLAB work just fine when mobile.
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#11
lynx29
Cheeseball
Not sure about you guys, but my G5 5587 (i7 8750H & GTX 1060 Max-Q) has been doing pretty well. It was thermal throttling with earlier BIOS versions, but 1.09 to 1.11 addressed the slow fan speeds. I can play PUBG at competitive settings pushing 90 FPS. Borderlands 3 also runs pretty good with a mix of medium to high settings at 60 to 80 FPS.

I can't play any 3D games on battery though, but Visual Studio and MATLAB work just fine when mobile.
Lot of us here like to game at 144hz though, but if 60hz is fine with you that is great and yeah a 1060 is fine for 60hz 1080p and lower a couple settings.
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#12
Cheeseball
lynx29
Lot of us here like to game at 144hz though, but if 60hz is fine with you that is great and yeah a 1060 is fine for 60hz 1080p and lower a couple settings.
Sometimes I dock the laptop to my Dell S2419HGF (144 MHz with FreeSync) through Thunderbolt 3/USB-C, so I can push for more frames if needed. When traveling I just settle with 60 FPS since I'll be mostly working anyways.
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#13
kapone32
lynx29
oh my gaming laptop works great, with mods.

What I do is remove the back cover, place it directly on a 6 fan laptop cooler with a little tape so it doesn't slide. Then I set BIOS to no turbo boost on CPU, which doesn't really matter in most games anyway. I get around 70 celsius on both cpu and my gtx 1070 in all games, except witcher 3 which hits around 78 celsius, still not bad. I get 90 fps as well no issue as my laptop screen is overclocked to 90hz. honestly I like my laptop, but it's not exactly portable. I mean I can travel with it, then set up a permanent desk area. which worked great for me cause I travel periodically to visit friends for 1-2 months at a time, and grad school was back and forth and then breaks back and forth, etc. so I didn't need fully mobile anyway.

but yeah I would never do it again.

@R-T-B sure you don't want to buy my gtx 1070 laptop? I give you discount fren ;) three niner!
I completely get your user scenario If you travel alot and are a true gamer. The issue for me is the fact that you have to use those fan arrays and still your CPU is in the 70s. The reason I say that a laptop for gaming is no go for me is because you can build a nice SFF PC that will give you peak performance without the heat issues. A 15-17" screen even at 1440P is not very difficult for a decent GPU like to 1070 to run well. Not that you can get a 1440P screen of that size but 1080P for sure. The cost is the other thing I look at. A Good Gaming focused laptop starts around $1200 Canadian and goes up from there. For $1200 I could build a killer SFF PC. In fact I could build a TR4 system (1st or 2nd Gen) for that amount of money (I can't believe the 1900X is $149 US on Amazon). One thing a laptop would be good for is all of the streaming goodness that is available like Netflix, Youtube, DAZN, DC Universe and my new favorite DIsney + but the WIFI card would have to up to snuff.
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#14
IceShroom
Just as I suspected, 24CU new Navi GPU went to Apple. I have pretty suspicion that 30CU Navi10 will also goto Apple.
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#15
dgianstefani
The hate against laptops is primarily coming from people who don't know how to properly shop for laptops, or configure them once owned.

I get it, desktops are hard to fuck up and easy to build with minimal effort. It's unlikely you'll have a bad experience building a desktop, while there are many shit laptops out there.

I own a Razer Blade 240hz, 9750h, 2070.

6 core turbo locked at 4ghz while gaming.
RTX 2070 hitting between 1700 and 1875mhz while gaming.

180 Average FPS in R6 Siege with settings mostly at ultra.
200 Average FPS in War thunder all settings ultra.
120+ fps on any typical AAA game with min low never going below 90.

The fans are audible but by no means a jet engine and the surface temps don't go above 30c so it's comfortable to game on.

Get a proper laptop after doing research.
Tune the CPU voltage with Throttlestop.
Set your own voltage curve with MSI afterburner for your GPU.
Profit.

Mine has a few extra mods like conductonaut and 32GB ram kit with better timings than stock but same mhz.

The laptop also gets a solid 5-6 hours of battery life which is very useful.
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#16
medi01
Great to see AMD returning to discrete mobile GPU market.
NV turned it into "no, thanks" market.
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#17
R-T-B
Khonjel
You guys a couple or sth?
No, I am not a sith.
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#18
phanbuey
dgianstefani
The hate against laptops is primarily coming from people who don't know how to properly shop for laptops, or configure them once owned.

I get it, desktops are hard to fuck up and easy to build with minimal effort. It's unlikely you'll have a bad experience building a desktop, while there are many shit laptops out there.

I own a Razer Blade 240hz, 9750h, 2070.

6 core turbo locked at 4ghz while gaming.
RTX 2070 hitting between 1700 and 1875mhz while gaming.

180 Average FPS in R6 Siege with settings mostly at ultra.
200 Average FPS in War thunder all settings ultra.
120+ fps on any typical AAA game with min low never going below 90.

The fans are audible but by no means a jet engine and the surface temps don't go above 30c so it's comfortable to game on.

Get a proper laptop after doing research.
Tune the CPU voltage with Throttlestop.
Set your own voltage curve with MSI afterburner for your GPU.
Profit.

Mine has a few extra mods like conductonaut and 32GB ram kit with better timings than stock but same mhz.

The laptop also gets a solid 5-6 hours of battery life which is very useful.
So you do all that on a $2600 laptop or...




With a $400 alienware 240hz monitor, you now have a rig thats quite a bit faster and $1100 cheaper ($1500 vs 2600), and is fully upgrade-able when new GPUs and CPUs release; with a much bigger screen.

And you still have $1100 to spend on a decent work ultrabook that's sleek and looks professional.

The problem with gaming laptops isn't when they're new (i loved my 17" alienware) - it's when they get to be about 1.5-2 years old and you realize what could have been your upgrade path if you got a gaming rig and invested the other $1100 into something else.
Posted on Reply
#19
Darmok N Jalad
TheGuruStud
I wonder how they won't spontaneously combust, anyway. Current models have the CPU dying from overheating. Who needs heatsinks and fans? Not apple!

It's all part of the master plan. Buy a $2k+ laptop and it fails in 1-2 yrs = you can buy another! This has been going on for several years, now. There's so many hardware defects. Even if it's under warranty, you're at fault and they tell you to buy a new one.
I think there are a few things at play here. One, Apple went too thin for the CPUs they included. I think part of the problem is Intel’s failure to deliver 10nm for this long. Apple appears to have made compromises based on what they had to work with. AMD also did them no favors with Vega too. Things don’t look all that much better from Intel either. Apple needs to thicken MBP or transition to their own SOC.
Posted on Reply
#20
Khonjel
Darmok N Jalad
I think there are a few things at play here. One, Apple went too thin for the CPUs they included. I think part of the problem is Intel’s failure to deliver 10nm for this long. Apple appears to have made compromises based on what they had to work with. AMD also did them no favors with Vega too. Things don’t look all that much better from Intel either. Apple needs to thicken MBP or transition to their own SOC.
Why dafuq do they need to thin and lighten a laptop that's designated as Pro? I can understand with MB Air or the plain MB (do anyone even buy those).
Posted on Reply
#21
Darmok N Jalad
Khonjel
Why dafuq do they need to thin and lighten a laptop that's designated as Pro? I can understand with MB Air or the plain MB (do anyone even buy those).
I don’t mind the goal, but it shouldn’t get in the way of function. Same is true with the terrible butterfly keyboard, but Apple saw the light and abandoned that with this new model.
Posted on Reply
#22
dgianstefani
phanbuey
So you do all that on a $2600 laptop or...




With a $400 alienware 240hz monitor, you now have a rig thats quite a bit faster and $1100 cheaper ($1500 vs 2600), and is fully upgrade-able when new GPUs and CPUs release; with a much bigger screen.

And you still have $1100 to spend on a decent work ultrabook that's sleek and looks professional.

The problem with gaming laptops isn't when they're new (i loved my 17" alienware) - it's when they get to be about 1.5-2 years old and you realize what could have been your upgrade path if you got a gaming rig and invested the other $1100 into something else.
It's cool how you're recommending used parts in a comparison to a new RRP.

Add $300 for a new 2080, more if you don't want a shitty model.

Add $100 for a good keyboard and mouse.

Take away IO like thunderbolt 3.

Compare the power draw and form factor of a bronze rated 350w system to a unibody laptop with a 180w psu that delivers approximately the same performance. (good luck getting more than 150fps on a ryzen 5 with cheap ram in cpu bound games).

Bottom line is a two system setup is not comparable to a single system that can do it all.

What you pay is what you get.

Also a black unibody machine that looks like a mbp clone can hardly be described as unprofessional.

The blade is basically a mbp but with upgradability, better specs, a good cooling system and a high refresh display. Oh and nice other things like WiFi 6 and such.
Posted on Reply
#23
phanbuey
dgianstefani
It's cool how you're recommending used parts in a comparison to a new RRP.

Add $300 for a new 2080, more if you don't want a shitty model.

Add $100 for a good keyboard and mouse.

Take away IO like thunderbolt 3.

Compare the power draw and form factor of a bronze rated 350w system to a unibody laptop with a 180w psu that delivers approximately the same performance. (good luck getting more than 150fps on a ryzen 5 with cheap ram in cpu bound games).

Bottom line is a two system setup is not comparable to a single system that can do it all.

What you pay is what you get.

Also a black unibody machine that looks like a mbp clone can hardly be described as unprofessional.

The blade is basically a mbp but with upgradability, better specs, a good cooling system and a high refresh display. Oh and nice other things like WiFi 6 and such.
It's just a quick build available and on amazon...

Im sitting on a 5.1ghz 6 core and 2080ti with a 1440 ultrawide for the same price as as that RRP. (and wifi 6, because that';s a $40 drop-in upgrade for a desktop with a better antenna)...

You do pay for what you get, but basically you paid almost double for current-gen performance crammed into an mpb body with no upgrade path (and yes that ryzen 5 @ 4.2 will get more fps than your laptop hex locked to 4ghz even with that ram).
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#24
dgianstefani
Anytime I want more gpu performance all I have to do is plug my laptop into its gpu dock on the desk that also gives me a bunch of extra IO or use my desktop. Not sure why, but you seem to think money is the only factor in choosing a system. Some of us have enough money to buy what we want and benefit from it.

In a year or two I'll sell my blade for around 1500, and replace it with something better. Meanwhile your 2080ti will have depreciated to around a third of its RRP.
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