Monday, December 30th 2019

Intel 10th Gen Core "Comet Lake" Lineup and Specs Revealed

Ahead of a possible reveal in the sidelines of CES, followed by an early-Q2 2020 product-launch, company slides detailing Intel's 10th generation Core desktop processors in the LGA1200 package, codenamed "Comet Lake-S," leaked to the web courtesy Informatica Cero. They confirm that HyperThreading will play a key role, with Intel enabling it across the lineup. The range-topping Core i9 series will be 10-core/20-thread along with 20 MB of L3 cache. The Core i7 series will be 8-core/16-thread, along with 16 MB L3 cache. The all-important Core i5 series will be 6-core/12-thread, equipped with 12 MB of L3 cache. The Core i3 series will have two sub-tiers: i3-103xx series with 4-core/8-thread and 8 MB L3 cache; and i3-101xx series 4-core/8-thread with 6 MB L3 cache.

The Core i7 and Core i9 "Comet Lake" chips will feature native support for dual-channel DDR4-2933, while the Core i5 and Core i3 will make do with native DDR4-2667 support (memory overclocking possible). Besides core/thread counts, and cache size increases, Intel will dial up clock speeds across the board by as much as 300 MHz per SKU (vs. their 9th gen predecessor), and introduce Turbo Boost Max 3.0, which has been exclusive to its HEDT processors. The introduction of Turbo Boost Max 3.0 could also bring about modern favored-core capability (benefiting Windows 10 1909 and later). The classic Turbo Boost is also available. There's also a mysterious new feature called "Thermal Velocity Boost," with its own set of clock-speeds depending on core/thread load. The chips could also feature Modern Standby C10 power-state support (first to the desktop platform). Intel is said to have also added several new core and memory overclocking features on the K-SKUs.
Built on a 14 nm-class silicon fabrication node, and featuring the same IPC as "Skylake," the 10th generation Core "Comet Lake" series will rely on aggressive power-management to sustain 65 W TDP rating for most SKUs, but Intel's virtual barrier for 95 W as the TDP number for unlocked K SKUs ends with the 10 generation (the i9-9900KS already breaks that). The 10th generation Core K SKUs have a scorching 125 W TDP rating not just for the 10-core i9-10900K and 8-core i7-10700K, but also the 6-core i5-10600K. The table above details the various SKUs we could make out from the low image-quality slide screenshots.
Sources: Informatica Cero, VideoCardz
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82 Comments on Intel 10th Gen Core "Comet Lake" Lineup and Specs Revealed

#26
dj-electric
Intel has an issue with pricing stuff fair when they absolutely have the chance to.

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#27
Penev91
All the TDP numbers should be put in quotation marks or reported as 65-ish, 125-ish, etc. :)
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#28
Darmok N Jalad
I can see the IGP remaining so Intel can continue to fill OEM contracts. Apple, for example, will still leverage the IGP for streaming, even with a dGPU. I’m sure Intel will also have a KF edition, but the early announcement is for the OEM partners.

Crackong
lols the Thermal velocity Boost :roll:

Are we getting a new kind of boost every year?

2021 - Vector Unidirectional Boost
2022 - Space Continuum Boost
2023 - Quantum Entanglement Boost
Ludicrous Speed Boost
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#29
ensabrenoir
.....been away for a minute but never in my wildest dreams did i think the landscape would've changed this much. The next few years will be amazing though....when intel finally gets it right and then Amd responds.....definitely a great time for the pc community.
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#30
JackCarver
10c/20t@4.8GHz all core Turbo looks for me as a nice gaming CPU
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#31
E-curbi
The EVGA Z490 DARK and Maximus XII Apex 2dimm boards should be interesting with beefed-up VRM sections for 10c20t. :)

Wonder if we'll get 5000Mhz or 5200Mhz ddr4 from Gskill, possibly.

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#32
WHOFOUNDFUNGUS
2017 - We will fix Spectre/Meltdown
2018 - We will definitely fix Spectre/Meltdown
2019 - We will definitely for sure fix Spectre/Meltdown
2020 - Ooops!
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#33
ppn
Too bad we can't have 8 core icelake backport to 14nm. it would take 399 sq.mm on 14nm.
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#34
cucker tarlson
btarunr
Imagine paying upward of $400 for a locked processor in 2020.
To be fair those locked skus boost higher than 3900x or 3800x both single and all core.
If 3800x can sell at 400 and 3900x at 500 then 450 for 10900 would be a good middle ground.
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#35
E-curbi
ppn
Too bad we can't have 8 core icelake backport to 14nm. it would take 399 sq.mm on 14nm.
Rocket Lake Z495 12months from now. lol :)

...if rumors become reality.
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#36
eidairaman1
The Exiled Airman
Zubasa
Windows does have the habit of shoveling the work load around the threads faster than the boost algorithm can keep up.
It is true even on 1909, the difference is Windows now juggles the workload within a CCX / CCD for AMD.
As for Intel I am not sure, but most people that got the 9900K just manual OC all the cores so no one really cared about how the boost worked.
For X299 most people got it for multi-threaded work loads so again no one really cared about the favorite core boost.
How to fix, junk w10 for linux
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#37
newtekie1
Semi-Retired Folder
Wouldn't it be interesting if the i3-10350K ended up being a 6c/6t part?

btarunr
Imagine paying upward of $400 for a locked processor in 2020.
Considering the vast majority of people don't overclock, it make senses.
Posted on Reply
#38
AusWolf
TesterAnon
And they are still selling locked CPUs, they just never learn.
I always buy the locked variants for 2 reasons:
1. You can save a significant amount of money buying a locked CPU with a B-series motherboard compared to its unlocked equivalent with a Z-series,
2. I run a m-ITX system, so heat (or the lack of) is more important for me than a few extra MHz - especially for gaming, where the GPU matters more anyway.

To the article: It looks like Intel is pushing hard in the core count race, but does nothing really interesting otherwise. I only use about 60-70% of my i7-7700 in literally every game I play, so I guess Comet Lake will be another generation to skip - or maybe it's time to consider AMD again.
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#39
jabbadap
newtekie1
Wouldn't it be interesting if the i3-10350K ended up being a 6c/6t part?

Considering the vast majority of people don't overclock, it make senses.
Not sure I would like that, unlocked 4c/8t sounds just better for the consistence: i9 10c/20t, i7 8c/16t, i5 6c/12t and i3 4c/8t.

Just have a feeling that those unlocked chips are pushed to the limit already... OC of cpus is a bit dying breed. More limiting factor for those locked CPUs is that low TDP rating, pair them with lower end board and you get a very throttling piece of personal calculator.
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#40
Turmania
I'm disappointed that Intel could not sort out its 10nm process for desktop users.I'm very disappointed with both companies on their TDP ratings.Which honestly should be investigated by the authorities in the U.S. it may even lead to lawsuit which I support against both companies. I would prefer taking turbo boost out.Find a middle ground from base clock to max turbo boost all cores. Let the cpu run with that and adjust tdp to new base speed. If a user wants to overclock then he can at his own liking.
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#41
_Flare
I´m not sure why i can read more than others. I made adjustments to the TPU Chart.
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#42
xorbe
i7 8700K demoted to i3, lol.
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#43
_Flare
i5-10600K has similarities with the i7-8700K, yes.
i3-10320 has similarities with i7-6700.
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#44
chodaboy19
For the two top SKUs i9-10900K and i9-10900 is there a significant difference in real world performance? How much headroom is there to overclock the unlocked K-version? (especially on air cooling)

For the first time it seems that getting the non-K version might save you the headache of overclocking to gain 200MHz?
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#45
londiste
chodaboy19
For the two top SKUs i9-10900K and i9-10900 is there a significant difference in real world performance? How much headroom is there to overclock the unlocked K-version? (especially on air cooling)
For the first time it seems that getting the unlocked version might save you the headache of overclocking to gain 200MHz?
125W vs 65W is a big difference. While K model power limit handling on motherboards varies, non-K models are usually handled per spec - 65W with short spike to 81W at the beginning of load.
Single-core or few-core load will not be much different but the heavier the load the more non-K model will fall behind due to lowered clocks.
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#46
ppn
i77700 demoted to i310100, and not surprising if $99 i3 - 8 threads pulls ahead of 9400F that struggles with only 6, despite being real cores.
Posted on Reply
#47
londiste
ppn
i77700 demoted to i310100, and not surprising if $99 i3 - 8 threads pulls ahead of 9400F that struggles with only 6, despite being real cores.
4c8t and 6c/6t Intel CPUs give pretty much the same performance in games.
7700K tends to pull ahead of 9400F thanks to higher clock speeds, not the extra threads. 9600K that runs largely the same clock speeds as 7700K is largely identical in performance.

I can say the same from personal experience as well, went from i7-6700K to i5-8400 and gaming performance is almost identical.
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#48
BArms
Why are Intel dragging their feet on PCIe 4.0? SSD's are already right at the bandwidth limit that 3.0 x4 can provide.
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#49
PanicLake
The fact that they still have the "premium" K unlocked version is ... something.
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#50
E-curbi
xorbe
i7 8700K demoted to i3, lol.
:D

My poor i3 8086K Special 40year Anniversary Edition i3, lolol. :roll:

Intel's silly product stacking - flagship promotional marketing. lol

NO IPC improvements since the 8700K/8086K, just adding cores +2 then +2 more along with additional internal factory reclocks since 2017. :laugh:

...they gotta do what they gotta do. :rolleyes:
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