Thursday, February 27th 2020

CORSAIR Releases Updated CORSAIR ONE PRO i200 Compact Workstation-Class PC

CORSAIR, a world leader in high-performance gaming peripherals and enthusiast components, today announced the launch of the CORSAIR ONE PRO i200, the latest configuration of its most powerful workstation-class PC. The CORSAIR ONE PRO offers an unparalleled combination of cutting-edge performance and compact size, packing the immense rendering, encoding, and creative power of a full-size workstation-class desktop PC into a gorgeous and quiet small-form-factor that takes up less desk space than a laptop. This is made possible by the latest Intel 10th Gen Core X high-end desktop processor and GeForce RTX 2080 Ti graphics from NVIDIA, in conjunction with a full range of high-quality CORSAIR components, all cooled by a patented convection-assisted liquid cooling system.

The new CORSAIR ONE PRO i200 is powered by a 14-core, 28-thread Intel Core i9-10940X CPU and an NVIDIA GeForce RTX 2080 Ti graphics card, enabling incredible rendering, encoding, and visualization speeds. 64 GB of quad-channel CORSAIR VENGEANCE DDR4 memory handles even the most demanding multitasking and content creation tasks, while a 2 TB high-speed M.2 NVMe SSD provides high-capacity storage and ultra-fast load times. The CORSAIR ONE PRO's unique convection-assisted liquid cooling system channels hot air upwards and expels it through the roof of the chassis, enabling its powerful components to operate at consistently high performance despite a volume of just 12 liters - less than ¼ that of a typical workstation PC.
A CORSAIR SF750 PLATINUM small-form-factor PSU delivers high-efficiency power to the CORSAIR ONE PRO i200. The system offers multi-monitor productivity, perfect for VR development, with support for up to four 4K HDR displays including a VR-ready HDMI port on the easy-access front I/O panel. The CORSAIR ONE PRO's built-in RGB light pipes are preconfigured to offer visual confirmation of system temperatures at a glance, and are fully programmable via CORSAIR iCUE software's vast customization options.

For the creative professional searching for the power of a full workstation-class desktop PC in an amazingly small form-factor, the CORSAIR ONE PRO i200 is the ideal choice to create something amazing.
Availability and Warranty
The CORSAIR ONE PRO i200 is available immediately from the CORSAIR webstore.

The CORSAIR ONE PRO i200 is backed by a two-year warranty, alongside the CORSAIR worldwide customer service and technical support network.
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13 Comments on CORSAIR Releases Updated CORSAIR ONE PRO i200 Compact Workstation-Class PC

#1
Alien_Zero
wake me up when they start doing Ryzen CPU based PCs.........
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#2
bonehead123
I generally like and use many Corsair products, and this is a nice looking case, but $4500 for a rig based on a 3yr old chipset, NO USB-C on the front I/O, only 2TB of storage, and a lame 2yr warranty

so..n.O.t. happening... :mad:..:(..:cry:
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#3
Cheeseball
Not a Potato
Isn't this the rig JayzTwoCents modified into a Star Wars-theme? The one where he broke the Titan RTX but was able to repair it with shoddy soldering? :laugh:
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#5
repman244
Workstation with a standard core i CPU and a gaming GPU?
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#6
nickbaldwin86
repman244
Workstation with a standard core i CPU and a gaming GPU?
PerfectWave
in a workstation pc a 2080ti omg
depends on the work loads. a lot of work loads benefit from a "standard i core" it's a 14core i9, hardly standard. and a LOT of work loads do better on a RTX/GTX then on a Quadro card. again all based on the work loads. they must be targeting a market for this WAY over priced PC.
Posted on Reply
#7
xkm1948
No threadripper gen 3 is a big let-down. Even a 3950X would be miles ahead in most productivity situations. Otherwise I would see many labs picking these up for dedicated workstations.
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#8
kapone32
xkm1948
No threadripper gen 3 is a big let-down. Even a 3950X would be miles ahead in most productivity situations. Otherwise I would see many labs picking these up for dedicated workstations.
Are you sure about that I can't see a 16 core CPU beating a 24 core with the same nodes in productivity. I know the 3950 is no joke but neither is the 3960X. The only thing I lament about GEN 3 is no X399 support.
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#9
MxPhenom 216
ASIC Engineer
nickbaldwin86
depends on the work loads. a lot of work loads benefit from a "standard i core" it's a 14core i9, hardly standard. and a LOT of work loads do better on a RTX/GTX then on a Quadro card. again all based on the work loads. they must be targeting a market for this WAY over priced PC.
I was about to say. My friend who does CAD work for his business uses a GTX/RTX card instead. The software he uses runs better and sees no benefit to a quadro card. hell the company that develops the software he uses doesnt even recommend a quadro card
Posted on Reply
#10
nickbaldwin86
MxPhenom 216
I was about to say. My friend who does CAD work for his business uses a GTX/RTX card instead. The software he uses runs better and sees no benefit to a quadro card. hell the company that develops the software he uses doesnt even recommend a quadro card
Yes! I have been doing IT work for over 10 years now, at a number of companies that use a wide variety of CAD software. It all depends on the software and work loads. you can go to any CAD software website and see the "recommended hardware" the same way you can for any other software or video game. some do recommend Quadro, some do recommend Xeon CPUs. BUT the thing is most DO NOT! the old IT guy at the last place I worked had the same mindset as the above comments and bought these crazy overpriced HP Workstations with Xeon/Quadro combos, and the software the engineers were using didn't even recommend or benefit from having those components.

Personally I would consider the Core i9-10940X CPU to be a workstation CPU... you don't need a CPU like that for gaming
Posted on Reply
#11
aktpu
xkm1948
No threadripper gen 3 is a big let-down. Even a 3950X would be miles ahead in most productivity situations. Otherwise I would see many labs picking these up for dedicated workstations.
This is a itx rig, there are no threadripper mobos in itx format and considering socket size, there probably won't be
Posted on Reply
#12
repman244
nickbaldwin86
depends on the work loads. a lot of work loads benefit from a "standard i core" it's a 14core i9, hardly standard. and a LOT of work loads do better on a RTX/GTX then on a Quadro card. again all based on the work loads. they must be targeting a market for this WAY over priced PC.
14 cores...I could even call that sub-standard for a "powerful workstation", also no option for ECC RAM.

Of course it's all workload dependent, but you should get better software support with Quadros (better drivers). And if you use software which does benefit from Quadros/FirePro they stomp the gaming cards, and if required you get more VRAM which usually has ECC - but all this costs crazy money.
Posted on Reply
#13
nickbaldwin86
repman244
14 cores...I could even call that sub-standard for a "powerful workstation", also no option for ECC RAM.

Of course it's all workload dependent, but you should get better software support with Quadros (better drivers). And if you use software which does benefit from Quadros/FirePro they stomp the gaming cards, and if required you get more VRAM which usually has ECC - but all this costs crazy money.
A 14 core CPU is still a workstation proc before it is a gaming CPU... I mean yeah we can go back and forth and back and forth but it should be obvious that Corsair is going after a certain market here.

I doubt they are attempting to play in the HPE workstation or the Dell workstation towers that can be $10k to 15k in add ons alone.

I agree with everything you are saying but again it is all about the market they are aiming for and to claim that this isn't a workstation is not a very good claim. It isn't a gaming PC, though it could work well as one.
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