Friday, May 15th 2020

Thermalright Intros TY-121BP FDB Low Impedance Fans

Thermalright introduced the TY-121BP FDB, a 120 mm case fan optimized for circulation applications. Built in a standard 25 mm-thick 120 mm format with rubberized frame mounts. The package includes rubber bolts in addition to metal screws. The fan features a long life (>40,000-hours rated) fluid-dynamic bearing. Taking in 4-pin (PWM) input, it spins between 600 - 1,800 RPM pushing 25.76 CFM of air at its lowest speed, and 77.28 CFM at top speed, with up to 2.70 mm H2O air-pressure. The noise output proportionately ranges between 19 to 25 dBA. The fan is currently selling in single-piece packages priced at $20, multi-fan packs are also in the works.
Add your own comment

29 Comments on Thermalright Intros TY-121BP FDB Low Impedance Fans

#1
xvi
A fan that's optimized for high static pressure, but they don't mention the static pressure rating in the marketing release? Only CFM? :wtf:
I'm no rocket surgeon, but that fan pitch looks too aggressive to be optimized for static pressure.

Edit: It's not even listed on their website!
TY-121BP FAN Spec:

Dimension:L120 mm x W120 mm x H25 mm
Weight:140g
Rated Speed:600~1800 RPM±10%
Noise Level:19~25 dBA
Air Flow:25.76~77.28 CFM
Connector:4 Pin (PWM Fan connector)
Ampere:0.25A
Bearing Type : FDB Bearing
Posted on Reply
#2
Johnny05
I agree that looks like an air flow fan and not a static pressure fan.
Posted on Reply
#3
Assimilator
xvi
A fan that's optimized for high static pressure, but they don't mention the static pressure rating in the marketing release? Only CFM? :wtf:
I'm no rocket surgeon, but that fan pitch looks too aggressive to be optimized for static pressure.

Edit: It's not even listed on their website!
Standard Thermalright...
Posted on Reply
#4
freeagent
Still.. 77cfm from a little 120mm fan that does it quietly is decent. I wouldn't be surprised if it kept up with a similar Noctua.
Posted on Reply
#5
Chrispy_
xvi
A fan that's optimized for high static pressure, but they don't mention the static pressure rating in the marketing release? Only CFM? :wtf:
I'm no rocket surgeon, but that fan pitch looks too aggressive to be optimized for static pressure.
Good job derailing the thread. You mentioned static pressure out of the blue for some unknown reason (or did I miss it in the article?)
  1. They look like airflow-optimised fans
  2. The article says they are circulation fans for case airflow, not static-pressure fans.
Why, exactly, did you bring static pressure into this at all?
Posted on Reply
#6
CheapMeat
Come on dudes, reading comprehension skills matter.
Posted on Reply
#7
btarunr
Editor & Senior Moderator
Sorry for the confusion. One of the retailer sources mentioned this fan as high static pressure because Thermalright includes this exact fan with their AIO CLCs. I edited it later.
Posted on Reply
#8
Chrispy_
btarunr
Sorry for the confusion. One of the retailer sources mentioned this fan as high static pressure because Thermalright includes this exact fan with their AIO CLCs. I edited it later.
Aha! That explains a lot :)
Posted on Reply
#9
BMfan80
Dimensions: W94.8 mm x D70 mm x H77 mm
Fan Dimensions: W120 mm x D120 mm x H25.4 mm
Fan Speed: 600~1800 RPM±10%
Air Flow: 25.76~77.28 CFM
Air Pressure: 0.30~2.72 mm H2O
Noise Level: 19~25 dBA
Weight: 1178 g
Radiator:Aluminum
Warranty: 2 Years
Posted on Reply
#10
Vya Domus
Here's an easy way to tell if a fan is optimized for static or air flow : just look at the gaps between the blades, the bigger the gaps the worse the pressure generated and the better the airflow.
Posted on Reply
#11
Turmania
A bit expensive on par with noctuas. But can it beat the noctuas?
Posted on Reply
#13
theGryphon
www.dirac.co.jp/ty-121bp/

Product Name / Product Model No.TY-121BP
JAN code0814256001526
Connector4-pin PWM
Fan Size / Weight(D)120 x (W)120 x (H)25mm / 140g
Bearing formatFluid bearings
Number of revolutions600 to 1,800 RPM
Maximum air volume77.28CFM
Maximum wind pressure (static pressure)2.72mm H2O
Maximum noise level25dBA
Package Size / Weight(W)150 x (H)180 x (D)30mm / 190g
Package contentsFan, taperscrew x4, rubber bush x4, peripheral conversion cable
Product WarrantySix years.
RemarksProduct specifications are subject to change without notice.


2.72mm H2O is surprisingly good.
Posted on Reply
#14
freeagent
Looks like it’s going to take on the NF-A12x25.
Nice to see them in the running again.
Posted on Reply
#15
Rx771
freeagent
Looks like it’s going to take on the NF-A12x25.
Nice to see them in the running again.
Thermalright's TY-12* has been launched for months, thermalright.com/product/ty-121bp/
But it's sucks, powerful enough but noisy.
Thermalright's fan going to take on the NF-A12x25 has been launched for years, it's TL-C12 thermalright.com/product/tl-c12/ . It's almost the same with A12x25, performance and sound.
Posted on Reply
#16
TheDeeGee
These are case fans, they simply copied the Noctua NF-S12A.

I use 5 of them.
Turmania
A bit expensive on par with noctuas. But can it beat the noctuas?
Not quite, the Noctua NF-S12A is 33,84 CFM at 600 RPM and 6.7 dB(A).
Posted on Reply
#17
mtcn77
theGryphon
www.dirac.co.jp/ty-121bp/

Product Name / Product Model No.TY-121BP
JAN code0814256001526
Connector4-pin PWM
Fan Size / Weight(D)120 x (W)120 x (H)25mm / 140g
Bearing formatFluid bearings
Number of revolutions600 to 1,800 RPM
Maximum air volume77.28CFM
Maximum wind pressure (static pressure)2.72mm H2O
Maximum noise level25dBA
Package Size / Weight(W)150 x (H)180 x (D)30mm / 190g
Package contentsFan, taperscrew x4, rubber bush x4, peripheral conversion cable
Product WarrantySix years.
RemarksProduct specifications are subject to change without notice.

2.72mm H2O is surprisingly good.
Wait until you see the ring reinforced rotor fans.
Is this even real!
Posted on Reply
#18
Rx771
TheDeeGee
These are case fans, they simply copied the Noctua NF-S12A.
:laugh: Of course TY-121BP is case fan, and please check Thermalright's the other product, TA120, which fan's shape it used is the same with TY-121BP. Tell me which "case fan" got enough air pressure to pass through the densely fins, don't tell me sucks S12A can.
TY-121BP's shape has been for years, check when Macho120 was launched. It's improved by X-silent 120, this shape even can pass through the 27mm radiator. And then check your proud S12A, is it can?
Posted on Reply
#19
_UV_
Cranky5150
Noctuas all day for me good sir...
I never used Noctua fans or other products, because sometimes cost matters a lot, and i have (for myself in usage and spare) several Thermalright (from 2010-12), about 50 Scythe (gentle typhoons, most of their other products have pretty bad longevity, even under 3 years in soft environment) and old 30-40 Glacialtech (dual ball bearings from 2005-8 still working fine) of all sizes from 80x80 to 140x140. And i either using them myself or install to clients and friends, so we talking about several hundreds of fans.
Posted on Reply
#20
ty_ger
What do they mean when they market it as a "Low Impedance" PWM fan? They are saying that it will drag down the PWM signal and wreak havoc on the PWM controller and its ability to manage multiple daisy-chained fans and/or pumps? That sounds like a terrible feature. PWM is supposed to be high impedance and there is never a reason why low impedance would be better.

Or are they using terrible marketing to describe some other physical attribute as "low impendance"? Like, it has low impedance to airflow? Let's hope they aren't that dim.
Posted on Reply
#21
Chrispy_
ty_ger
What do they mean when they market it as a "Low Impedance" PWM fan? They are saying that it will drag down the PWM signal and wreak havoc on the PWM controller and its ability to manage multiple daisy-chained fans and/or pumps? That sounds like a terrible feature. PWM is supposed to be high impedance and there is never a reason why low impedance would be better.

Or are they using terrible marketing to describe some other physical attribute as "low impendance"? Like, it has low impedance to airflow? Let's hope they aren't that dim.
The only rational explaination for the word impedance is that the hub and hub support struts are small and thin, offering lower impedance to the airflow.

As you say, low electrical impedance would be bad. As, thinking about it, would acoustic impedance. You'd want high acoustic impedance to keep noises in your case from escaping past the fan to the oustide.
Posted on Reply
#22
mtcn77
ty_ger
What do they mean when they market it as a "Low Impedance" PWM fan? They are saying that it will drag down the PWM signal and wreak havoc on the PWM controller and its ability to manage multiple daisy-chained fans and/or pumps? That sounds like a terrible feature. PWM is supposed to be high impedance and there is never a reason why low impedance would be better.

Or are they using terrible marketing to describe some other physical attribute as "low impendance"? Like, it has low impedance to airflow? Let's hope they aren't that dim.
Low impedance means it is a case fan, not a radiator fan.
Posted on Reply
#23
ty_ger
mtcn77
Low impedance means it is a case fan, not a radiator fan.
Their marketing department is completely clueless if that is what they mean. Very misleading. Also, it makes it so that anyone who knows anything about electronics will actively avoid this fan; stupid marketing.
Posted on Reply
#24
mtcn77
ty_ger
Their marketing department is completely clueless if that is what they mean. Very misleading. Also, it makes it so that anyone who knows anything about electronics will actively avoid this fan; stupid marketing.
Well, there is a market for anything.
High impedance fans don't cater to the noise consciencious market. There is no relativite ground in this measure. If it is high impedance, you have the turbulence.
Also, high impedance destroys the image of the coolers. Once you push more air, the flow cross-section becomes turbulent and a competitive noise race with blade servers starts. Very funny to notice this, it totally limits fan preferences.
Posted on Reply
#25
ty_ger
mtcn77
Well, there is a market for anything.
High impedance fans don't cater to the noise consciencious market. There is no relativite ground in this measure. If it is high impedance, you have the turbulence.
Also, high impedance destroys the image of the coolers. Once you push more air, the flow cross-section becomes turbulent and a competitive noise race with blade servers starts. Very funny to notice this, it totally limits fan preferences.

I think that you are somehow missing the point. I have zero interest in the information you provided and am not arguing anything about airflow. It's really funny that you think that is what high impedance or low impedance means. I mean, it doesn't even say that anywhere on the graphs you provided, but somehow that is already what it means to you. I sure hope that this terminology hasn't already caught on with others; otherwise confusion is unavoidable.

Using the term "low impedance" or "high impedance" to describe a PWM fan's air flow is STUPID. That's the problem.

Couldn't they use any other term? What's wrong with static pressure or CFM or any other already available measure of airflow?

PWM is an electronic feature. High impedance, or low impedance, is an electronic design characteristic. Stating "Low impedance PWM fan" literally states that it uses a low impedance PWM circuit; which is electrically terrible for this purpose. Literally. Like, you know, this is English, and that is what they wrote. That's also terrible; to destroy the meaning of words. Electrical impedance is very important ... why devalue it by using it to describe airflow?

Can't they use any other less misleading marketing terminology?
Posted on Reply
Add your own comment