Wednesday, July 15th 2020

iiyama Announces GB3466WQSU Red Eagle Monitor: 34", 3440x1440, 144Hz, HDR400, 1500R

Japanese monitor maker iiyama has recently announced the GB3466WQSU Red Eagle gaming monitor, this monitor is quite similar to the GB3461WQSU which was released by iiyama a few months ago. The GB3466WQSU is a high-end gaming monitor with almost all the features you could want, a 3440x1440 resolution, 144Hz refresh rate with FreeSync Premium Pro support, VA panel, and 1500R curve. The VA panel comes with a typical brightness of 400 cd/m² scoring it HDR400 certification along with a typical static contrast of 3000:1.

The included monitor allows for height (110 mm), and tilt (-5°, +20°) adjustment or can be mounted to any VESA compatible stand using the 100 x 100 mm mount. The monitor features x2 HDMI and x2 DisplayPort but you will want to use DisplayPort as HDMI caps out at 100Hz, a basic dual port USB 3.0 hub is also included. The monitor features dual 3 W speakers and a 3.5 mm jack for all your audio needs. The monitor measures 808 mm x 441.5 mm x 256 mm and comes in at 10.9 kg, the monitor is currently available to pre-order for 429.99 GBP (~540 USD) with delivery expected July 24th.
Source: iiyama
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13 Comments on iiyama Announces GB3466WQSU Red Eagle Monitor: 34", 3440x1440, 144Hz, HDR400, 1500R

#1
kayjay010101
Ah, the HDR400 certification, otherwise known as "This monitor accepts HDR signals but using HDR on this monitor provides zero visual benefit over SDR".

The rest actually seems to be not too bad of a deal. 21:9 1440p 144Hz with FreeSync for <$550 is absolutely not something to scoff at.
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#2
BoboOOZ
Looks very good.

For HDR, frankly, I'm not sure I would want 1000 nits on a monitor that I'm sitting only 50cm from, anyway. 400 is more than I would personally use.
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#3
halcyon
BoboOOZ
Looks very good.

For HDR, frankly, I'm not sure I would want 1000 nits on a monitor that I'm sitting only 50cm from, anyway. 400 is more than I would personally use.
1000 nits at a bunch of pixels level is different from 1000 nits at whole screen level.

That's the whole point of HDR (initially).

Too bad, this can only do 400 cd/m2 and even that only at full (whole) screen brightness.

Then again, for this price in 2020, that's all we can buy :-D
Posted on Reply
#4
BoboOOZ
halcyon
1000 nits at a bunch of pixels level is different from 1000 nits at whole screen level.
I would argue that a 2 cm diameter 1000 nit disc of light in a dark image would be really bad for your eye because it wouldn't trigger the pupillary reflex as strongly, and at such a short distance it could affect your retina, at least in time.

I really think that HDR 1000 is not a great idea for monitors, not without some serious caveats, at least.
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#5
Mistral
BoboOOZ
For HDR, frankly, I'm not sure I would want 1000 nits on a monitor that I'm sitting only 50cm from, anyway. 400 is more than I would personally use.
I like my eyes too...
Posted on Reply
#6
kayjay010101
BoboOOZ
I would argue that a 2 cm diameter 1000 nit disc of light in a dark image would be really bad for your eye because it wouldn't trigger the pupillary reflex as strongly, and at such a short distance it could affect your retina, at least in time.

I really think that HDR 1000 is not a great idea for monitors, not without some serious caveats, at least.
HDR1000 is pretty much necessary to actually see the difference in HDR. HDR400 has pretty much the same dynamic range as SDR, and can in a lot of monitors even look worse than SDR. You need a higher peak brightness to see the added dynamic range. Now HDR content isn't whatever you're describing (who is watching a 2cm disc of white light on a dark image?), it's just normal content where dark shadows and bright skies would have more detail. Now if you sit all day in a dark room with HDR1000 turned on you're guaranteed eye damage, but you're pretty much also guaranteed it with HDR400 or SDR for that matter. CNET said it best in this article: HDR done right isn't necessarily any brighter than non-HDR overall, it just has flashes of bright highlights and a more realistic treatment of real-world bright and dark areas in general.

Also, HDR400 can actually make the image look considerably worse, as blacks are crushed. HDR400 doesn't have local dimming, which means the backlight is cranked up to max, which crushes blacks. HDR1000 doesn't have this issue. With HDR400, at best you gain a bit of color and some brighter highlights than SDR, but you gain no extra contrast and lose a lot in blacks.
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#7
BoboOOZ
kayjay010101
snip...
who is watching a 2cm disc of white light on a dark image?
snip...
CNET said it best in this article: HDR done right isn't necessarily any brighter than non-HDR overall, it just has flashes of bright highlights and a more realistic treatment of real-world bright and dark areas in general.
It seems to me, though, that we're describing the same thing. Explosions, eruptions, flashes of light which appear rarely in action games and movies ;)
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#8
kmetek
G-Sync compatibile?
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#9
mtcn77
This is good. It is either going to be a narrow spectrum quantum dot display, or bright in order to preserve color definition in contrast with ambient reflections.
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#10
nickbaldwin86
kmetek
G-Sync compatibile?
for double the cost... no this is free sync, says in the article
Posted on Reply
#11
Slizzo
nickbaldwin86
for double the cost... no this is free sync, says in the article
Not what he asked.

Since this is Freesync @kmetek , it should work with G-Sync compatibility.
Posted on Reply
#12
nickbaldwin86
Slizzo
Not what he asked.

Since this is Freesync @kmetek , it should work with G-Sync compatibility.
yeah I realize that but until tested who really knows. I wouldn't buy it hoping for it to compatible, should wait for proper reviews or NVidia to put it on their list of compatible monitors for Gsync, not a forum post.
Posted on Reply
#13
Slizzo
nickbaldwin86
yeah I realize that but until tested who really knows. I wouldn't buy it hoping for it to compatible, should wait for proper reviews or NVidia to put it on their list of compatible monitors for Gsync, not a forum post.
It’s Freesync Premium, barring any weird issues it should work fine. No I can’t guarantee that, but I’ve yet to see a good freesync monitor not work with G-Sync. Al he has to do is enable g-sync compatibility in driver.
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