Tuesday, July 28th 2020

CES 2021 Cancelled, Online Virtual Expo in the Offing

The 2021 edition of the International CES has been cancelled, organizers CTA announced. The 2021 edition, like almost every other edition, was scheduled to take place between January 6-9, 2021. The CTA will now work to set up an "all digital experience" working with all its exhibitors. The show is now expected to only make a comeback in 2022, provided the COVID-19 situation improves. The pandemic still wreaks havoc across the globe, with most nations experiencing community spread. Mass vaccination before the turn of the year seems unlikely, with most vaccine developers yet to test their vaccine candidates.

"Amid the pandemic and growing global health concerns about the spread of COVID-19, it's just not possible to safely convene tens of thousands of people in Las Vegas in early January 2021 to meet and do business in person," CTA president and CEO Gary Shapiro said in a statement. Despite fears of the pandemic looming on exhibitors' and visitors' minds, the 2020 edition of CES drew more than 170,000 visitors and over 4,400 exhibitors (that's just for the official exhibitors, not counting the many more exhibiting in nearby locations).
Source: CES
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15 Comments on CES 2021 Cancelled, Online Virtual Expo in the Offing

#2
neatfeatguy
Loss of these events means loss of revenue for local businesses that thrived during them and welcomed them.

Local businesses that have grown accustomed to the business and rely on it, they'll start to vanish. Loss of jobs and income.
Posted on Reply
#3
nickbaldwin86
it is virtual for me every year. LOL

not sure how you can turn an event like this into a "virtual event" they going to send you all the hardware to look at in person?
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#4
PowerPC
Wow, they're canceling it really early. We still have more than 5 months until the next CES should be. I guess the US has some more problems with Covid, but still...

Covid won't be stopped. Herd immunity will eventually be the answer to it. You can't stop it anymore unless by some miracle vaccines against Coronaviruses are invented, which have been tried for many years before Covid and never worked. So I wouldn't hold my breath. It will just be herd immunity like we have with most other diseases.
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#5
W1zzard
Ah poor people in Vegas, even more revenue lost :(

and I really enjoyed the years I went to CES .. Computex is better though, so fingers crossed for 2021 Computex ^^
PowerPC
It will just be herd immunity like we have with most other diseases.
Like for the flu.. also, only early data, but Google: antibodies 3 months
PowerPC
Wow, they're canceling it really early
Good, rather make the final decision now, than invest $$ and it gets cancelled eventually. Actually I'm impressed that CTA aren't as greedy as everyone though they are
btarunr
all digital experience
I think a few companies tried something like this in June, as Computex replacement, total disaster
Posted on Reply
#6
Vayra86
PowerPC
Wow, they're canceling it really early. We still have more than 5 months until the next CES should be. I guess the US has some more problems with Covid, but still...

Covid won't be stopped. Herd immunity will eventually be the answer to it. You can't stop it anymore unless by some miracle vaccines against Coronaviruses are invented, which have been tried for many years before Covid and never worked. So I wouldn't hold my breath. It will just be herd immunity like we have with most other diseases.
Covid won't be stopped but will become easier to treat. We don't stop a lot of viruses, that's fine. Its about managing them, right now it seems that puzzle is far from complete. Patients are left with all sorts of mid to long term problems, even scars on the heart which can induce future heart rhythm failures. And that is just one of our organs.

Early on the prediction was several years before we would understand it proper. I think that prediction still stands. Herd immunity will be seasonal at best, and even that seems a stretch, its summer now.
Posted on Reply
#7
ssdpro
There isn't going to be herd immunity to covid19 if antibodies are dwindling in 4-8 weeks as has been found. It just has to be managed as even vaccines are only partially effective and that is if people even trust a rush job.
Posted on Reply
#8
PowerPC
W1zzard
Like for the flu.. also, only early data, but Google: antibodies 3 months
I don't obviously mean full immunity. But the problem will go away when the people die out that are most susceptible to this disease. The Flu wiped out whole populations when it first started infecting people. Now even if you get it, most will do just fine because people now have stronger immune systems against it in general through pretty much natural selection. Which is a kind of herd immunity. It doesn't mean that the flu is less dangerous than before.

So if it's not going to totally go away, it will be around just like the flu. Does this mean we all have to stop interacting and start canceling all big events? I know it sounds harsh to say let certain people to just die out, but this is how these things always went and it's not going to change now, unless we all stay home forever and cancel everything, which is kind of the direction it's going now.

Btw. I'm not against things like masks for a period just to flatten the curve for the hospitals. I even think we should have mandatory periods like that for everybody whenever we're above a certain number of infections (above hospital capacity, basically). But anything that goes beyond that like canceling events is not going to change things in the long run. It's wishful thinking at best, fearmongering at worst.
Posted on Reply
#9
Dave65
We will all be dead by then..
Posted on Reply
#10
Tomorrow
W1zzard
Like for the flu.. also, only early data, but Google: antibodies 3 months
Not only that - Sweden's national experiment that has costed them 5x as much lives as all other Scandinavian contries combined has shown that even there less than 10% of people had immunity. Coupled with the immunity lasting a short period and all talks of some sort of herd immunity are pure BS.
Posted on Reply
#11
Vayra86
PowerPC
I don't obviously mean full immunity. But the problem will go away when the people die out that are most susceptible to this disease. The Flu wiped out whole populations when it first started infecting people. Now even if you get it, most will do just fine because people now have stronger immune systems against it in general through pretty much natural selection. Which is a kind of herd immunity. It doesn't mean that the flu is less dangerous than before.

So if it's not going to totally go away, it will be around just like the flu. Does this mean we all have to stop interacting and start canceling all big events? I know it sounds harsh to say let certain people to just die out, but this is how these things always went and it's not going to change now, unless we all stay home forever and cancel everything, which is kind of the direction it's going now.

Btw. I'm not against things like masks for a period just to flatten the curve for the hospitals. I even think we should have mandatory periods like that for everybody whenever we're above a certain number of infections (above hospital capacity, basically). But anything that goes beyond that like canceling events is not going to change things in the long run. It's wishful thinking at best, fearmongering at worst.
I get what you're saying and feel much the same way about it. But this is not much like the flu in every other way than it being a virus, too with temporary antibody counters. The ramifications of getting it are long lasting, whereas with the flu, you just feel better at some point. Chronic lack of energy for prolonged periods of time and several forms of organ damage are lasting effects. So its not just the weak that die, its the entire population, young AND old that will take a major hit to general health and therefore future prosperity. Lost generation, or even generations is what we're looking at. The more this virus can infect, the bigger the impact, which is a global increase in healthcare requirements along with a reduction in capable workforce.

So at this point in time, cancelling events is most certainly the better option, and will remain so going forward in the near future. It really is a lot better to avoid this virus if you have the opportunity. For me personally the limit to that prevention is when it has psychological impact in the sense of social needs. Mass events are not among those needs, to me, but that is different for everyone. Still, things to consider, its good to be realistic about it, but I would suggest not to underestimate it.
Posted on Reply
#12
Frick
Fishfaced Nincompoop
So not actually cancelled, just moved to a different venue.
Posted on Reply
#13
kiriakost
neatfeatguy
Loss of these events means loss of revenue for local businesses that thrived during them and welcomed them.

Local businesses that have grown accustomed to the business and rely on it, they'll start to vanish. Loss of jobs and income.
The ones trading Pop-corn and hotels ?

Either way even CES it has to adjust as we do all worldwide.
Consumers wallets are half empty, and even finding food these days this is is tough goal.
Posted on Reply
#14
EarthDog
I'm really going to miss CES/Vegas... one of my favorite places to be. It's a grind for most media going from hotel to hotel to meet as many contacts as possible, but damn is it a blast!
Posted on Reply
#15
PowerPC
Vayra86
I get what you're saying and feel much the same way about it. But this is not much like the flu in every other way than it being a virus, too with temporary antibody counters. The ramifications of getting it are long lasting, whereas with the flu, you just feel better at some point. Chronic lack of energy for prolonged periods of time and several forms of organ damage are lasting effects. So its not just the weak that die, its the entire population, young AND old that will take a major hit to general health and therefore future prosperity. Lost generation, or even generations is what we're looking at. The more this virus can infect, the bigger the impact, which is a global increase in healthcare requirements along with a reduction in capable workforce.

So at this point in time, cancelling events is most certainly the better option, and will remain so going forward in the near future. It really is a lot better to avoid this virus if you have the opportunity. For me personally the limit to that prevention is when it has psychological impact in the sense of social needs. Mass events are not among those needs, to me, but that is different for everyone. Still, things to consider, its good to be realistic about it, but I would suggest not to underestimate it.
Thanks for the balanced answer and I'm with you on most everything you said.

There's just the thing that all people don't seem to have the same ramifications from getting it. I doubt that all people get long-lasting damage if many don't even get symptoms. From what I understand, the long-lasting damage comes only when you get a bad lung infection from it. I guess getting a lung infection is never good, but yea, Covid make you more susceptible to that. And the people that die, die because of the severe lung infections when the body can't deal with it anymore. But people's bodies seem to handle it very differently. That's why herd "immunity" will eventually help us, even if canceling events for years to come won't. I don't doubt we will beat Covid eventually, I just doubt that it will cost any fewer lives in the long run, if we overreact.
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