Wednesday, August 12th 2020

Philips Launches the 279C9 Monitor: 27" 4K, IPS, 60 Hz, FreeSync, DisplayHDR 400

MMD announces the new Philips 279C9 LCD display, a 27" (68.47 cm) monitor. The Ultra HD Philips 279C9 monitor features a Zero Bezel design, which eliminates the surrounding frame resulting in an expansive picture and simultaneously enables seamless multi-monitor set-ups.

Nowadays everyone is used to work with multiple devices connected, which means that ports are a key feature that cannot be missed. The Philips 279C9 includes a USB Type-C connector, which allows users to transfer data at a super-speed and charge the laptop at the same time (up to 65 W). The monitor also features one DisplayPort, two HDMI and four USB 3.2 ports. The IPS panel chosen for this model gives extra-wide viewing angles of 178/178 degrees, allowing for a clear and bright image from almost every angle.
Moreover, IPS displays ensure remarkably crisp images with vivid colors, making them ideal not only for viewing and editing photos, movies and for web browsing, and the VESA-certified DisplayHDR 400 support, this monitor reproduces every detail. A great and fuller color palette will enrich the vision and make every image more engaging, with deeper and more nuanced blacks, and peak brightness up to 400 nits. The Philips 279C9 also supports AMD FreeSync technology for effortlessly smooth gameplay without stutter or tearing, while also supporting SmartImage game mode for picture enhancement.

When working, there are three major aspects that we should always take care of: keep a correct posture, reduce eye fatigue and take some rest. The Philips 279C9 makes working hours as comfortable as possible starting from its base: the SmartErgoBase is a unique tilt, swivel, pivot and height-adjustable stand that provides maximum flexibility to the user and delivers ergonomic display comfort, allowing the display to be positioned easily as needed.

To ease the physical strains of a long workday, the display also features LowBlue Mode for easy-on-the-eyes productivity and Flicker-Free technology for less eye-fatigue. The Philips 279C9 will be available end of August with an MSRP of £439 / 489 Euros.
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19 Comments on Philips Launches the 279C9 Monitor: 27" 4K, IPS, 60 Hz, FreeSync, DisplayHDR 400

#1
medi01
75Hz max blows it somewhat.
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#2
Xex360
medi01
75Hz max blows it somewhat.
Unfortunately DP2 is yet to launch and monitor manufacturers are stupid and don't want to use HDMI2.1.
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#3
TheLostSwede
Xex360
Unfortunately DP2 is yet to launch and monitor manufacturers are stupid and don't want to use HDMI2.1.
You going to cover the licensing costs? HDMI isn't free, unlike DP.
Posted on Reply
#4
Chomiq
Xex360
Unfortunately DP2 is yet to launch and monitor manufacturers are stupid and don't want to use HDMI2.1.
Phillips is delaying launch of hdmi 2.1 displays until there's actual hardware out that can use it, which means late 2020 or early 2021.
Posted on Reply
#5
Xex360
Chomiq
Phillips is delaying launch of hdmi 2.1 displays until there's actual hardware out that can use it, which means late 2020 or early 2021.
Yeah... Don't understand this ridiculous situation, no GPU has HDMI2.1 even the 1200$ 2080ti hell even professional cards.
TheLostSwede
You going to cover the licensing costs? HDMI isn't free, unlike DP.
Granted for this product I agree, but those stupidly expensive monitors that cost more than a far superior 55" OLED, those look silly.
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#6
Nater
Man I hate marketing departments. What is the definition of "zero bezel design" anyways? There's gotta be a quarter inch all the way around that screen.
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#7
Mysteoa
Nater
Man I hate marketing departments. What is the definition of "zero bezel design" anyways? There's gotta be a quarter inch all the way around that screen.
Because it is not plastic bezel but glass. I have 2 monitors like this and the bezel is around 5mm. They can't remove it entirely, it is needed for structural reasons.
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#8
tomc100
So why don't new monitors have DP 2.0?
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#9
theonek
tomc100
So why don't new monitors have DP 2.0?
And what will you get more from dp2.0? Except higher refresh rate in 4k resolution, otherwise picture will be the same as others type of monitor inputs....
Posted on Reply
#10
TheLostSwede
Nater
Man I hate marketing departments. What is the definition of "zero bezel design" anyways? There's gotta be a quarter inch all the way around that screen.
This site is metric, so please stop using antiquated measurements outside of your tribal village.
tomc100
So why don't new monitors have DP 2.0?
Because there are no display driver ICs with DP 2.0 yet? Also, no benefit whatsoever in this case.

DP 2.0 is also quite complex www.anandtech.com/show/14590/vesa-announces-displayport-20-standard-bandwidth-for-8k-monitors-beyond
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#11
Vayra86
Another fake HDR monitor. Yay
Posted on Reply
#12
Nater
TheLostSwede
This site is metric, so please stop using antiquated measurements outside of your tribal village.
As soon as TPU starts referring to it as a 68.47cm monitor in the lead, sure. :D

Even on my fancy LG Ultragear Ultrawide with "slim bezel"....sure the plastic is less than 2mm all the way around...but the actual screen stops on the glass another 8mm past that! Only one I can think of off the top of my head that comes close to their "slim bezel" claim is the Dell Infinity Edge screens (i think is what they're called)
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#13
Chrispy_
4K at 27" is just the wrong pixel density for a desktop monitor. about 160% scaling is what you need and both 150% and 175% scaling look like garbage.
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#14
TheLostSwede
Chrispy_
4K at 27" is just the wrong pixel density for a desktop monitor. about 160% scaling is what you need and both 150% and 175% scaling look like garbage.
Time to invest in some glasses. Been using my 27" 4k screen for around four years by now and I'm on 125% scaling which is just fine. I do have glasses though, but that's because I have astigmatism...
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#15
Caring1
Vayra86
Another fake HDR monitor. Yay
This one actually meets the minimum criteria and is certified.
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#16
Vayra86
Caring1
This one actually meets the minimum criteria and is certified.
The VESA HDR spec is broken to the core, its an industry effort and has no relation to what HDR is supposed to be. Stay. Away.

300-400 still offer shit black levels, 300-400 can't even get the contrast steps visualized that are bare necessity for any sort of HDR to begin with. Any backlight can do 350cd/m2 and most can do 400cd/m2, its bog standard but still enough for a sticker.

Then you get 600. Unless that comes with lots of local dimming zones or FALD you get brightness levels you really don't want to sit close to. And along with that, your black levels also rise along with it, so you again lack the required contrast steps UNLESS the local dimming is done right.

Then 1000. 1000 nit backlight spikes. Try looking into the sun for a split second - that's what you're spending money on. Doctor's advice: don't look at the sun. And again, same stuff applies as with 600; the result all hinges on a good implementation of the backlight and local dimming.


OLED: has zero problems achieving HDR because of its low black point and near infinite contrast ratio. It doesn't get bright. It just gets really perfect blacks, giving us lots of wiggle room for all the required contrast steps on top of black, without having to look into super bright lights. 200cd/m2 is enough for OLED, which is close to the 180 that is often recommended for indoors and perfectly calibrated panels. This is a value you can look at all day with minimal eye strain. And hey... no VESA bullshit stickers required.

This should not come as a surprise. Monitor and TV land is full of this nonsense. You get twenty stickers with every product and 18 of them serve to hide inferior panel characteristics. The VESA HDR sticker is yet another one, no matter the number it has. The industry wants to keep selling those inferior panels to us because OLED is out of reach. Its just that simple.
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#17
stimpy88
It's like the exact same identical monitors keep getting released again and again and again. OK, I concede that the case and the brand on it differs slightly each time...

But the same old specs which almost nobody wants anymore, even my 9 year old cousin picked out a 144Hz monitor for gaming on with no input from an adult, just based on how it looked playing Fortnight in the store!

Oh, and while I'm at it, why do these awful monitors keep supporting some VESA HDR "standard" that simply does not work or offer a tangible benefit to the user?
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#18
kiriakost
There is no more Philips brand, some one from Asia just using the logo.
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#19
Chrispy_
Vayra86
[VESA HDR spec rant]
Yep. I have an HDR1000 freesync TV with "FULL local dimming" which turns out to be 50 backlight zones. I guess that's ten columns and five rows. How is a 10x5 resolution in any way "high definition"? I can clearly make out big rectangular patches of brightness on a dark background :\

Given that this is one of the 'better' options for LCD HDR right now, I'm pretty much taking a hard pass on HDR unless it's OLED. I've seen the Asus 384-zone FALD in the flesh and yeah, it's better but you can't un-see the fact that 384 patches isn't a good match for the 8.3million individiual pixels. Maybe 38400 backlight zones would be enough that I'd stop caring...
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