Thursday, August 20th 2020

Ampere's Launch Edges Closer: NVIDIA "PG133A" Board Gets RRA Certification

That Ampere's launch is edging closer is sort of a lapalissian truth; as time advances, a new consumer gaming graphics card from NVIDIA becomes ever more likely. However, we are now witnessing what amount to be the final steps in NVIDIA's preparation for launch of their next-generation RTX 3000 series. NVIDIA has submitted with the Korean National Radio Research Agency (RAA) their PG133A board design for certification, which is being pegged as the one that's been in numerous leaks already, with that fancy PCB and cooling solution.

Such certification is one of the last steps before a product comes to market, and timing seems to be inline with the #ultimatecountdown teaser that NVIDIA has been spearheading, the results of which should be clear by August 31st. It remains to be seen if the Founders' Edition will feature the leaked cooler across all products, of if NVIDIA will be staggering its design (maybe re-purposing that of last year's RTX 2000 series) for lower-tier SKUs in order to shave costs.
Source: VideoCardz
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27 Comments on Ampere's Launch Edges Closer: NVIDIA "PG133A" Board Gets RRA Certification

#1
watzupken
"However, we are now witnessing what amount to be the final steps in NVIDIA's preparation for launch of their next-generation RX 3000 series. "

Should be RTX, not RX.
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#2
TheDeeGee
I wonder how well this design will cool, and what the noise levels are.

Having the VRMs on it's own heatsink is a good thing.
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#3
Vya Domus
TheDeeGeeHaving the VRMs on it's own heatsink is a good thing.
VRMs don't dissipate little heat, below 15-20W at worst.
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#4
Turmania
Out of curiosity, why does an american company have to register a product in Korea?
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#5
Naito
TurmaniaOut of curiosity, why does an american company have to register a product in Korea?
To allow it to be sold in the region?
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#6
DuxCro
TurmaniaOut of curiosity, why does an american company have to register a product in Korea?
Probably because nothing is made these days in USA
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#7
StefanM
TurmaniaOut of curiosity, why does an american company have to register a product in Korea?
It's a radio license to make sure the device doesn't disturb other electronics, this is required in many countries.

Check out: rra.go.kr/en/index.do
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#8
FreedomEclipse
~Technological Technocrat~
TheDeeGeeI wonder how well this design will cool, and what the noise levels are.

Having the VRMs on it's own heatsink is a good thing.
Normally yes and even more so if the heatsink is a triple slot like those Asus StriXX cards. if not, so long as the VRM has its own heatsinks and there is always good airflow then it will be ok.
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#9
Dammeron
Separate power delivery PCB - and here I was hoping for a short, watercooled card... I hope it's not connected to the main card with a soldered cord, like it was with 2060.
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#10
Parn
Rumors are that Ampere cards are quite power hungry. This could be the reason why the VRM requires its own dedicated cooling?
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#11
_JP_
Cleaning dust and exchanging TIM on this will be fun...
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#12
jesdals
I like the design, fear that I am not going to like the price.... $ 2000 for the RTX 3090 :S
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#13
DuxCro
I sold my RTX 2060 Super yesterday. Now i am on HD 4850 512MB GDDR3 until RTX 3000 comes out. Needed a break from gaming anyways. Hoping to get RTX 3080.:clap:
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#14
Xaled
Nvidia has been doing too much leaks. Looks like like Navi is coming strong
DuxCroI sold my RTX 2060 Super yesterday. Now i am on HD 4850 512MB GDDR3 until RTX 3000 comes out. Needed a break from gaming anyways. Hoping to get RTX 3080.:clap:
You may need to sell 4 or 5 2060Ss to get an RTX 3080 .. ( if the rumours of a 2000$ 3090 price are turn to be true )
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#15
phanbuey
The cooling looks absolutely terrible. I know they had a very talented team of engineers design this, but It's basically 1 fan to cool the GPU side of things. If the gpu on this gets even remotely close to how hot the 2x or 1x series get than that cooler would fail.

They have 1 fan fighting against the PCB and some side fins with no direct airflow to cool the main PCB portion of the card. Unless the PCB fan is doing most of the cooling on the GPU...

This is one of those "wait to read reviews before buying" products for sure.
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#16
ObiFrost
DuxCroI sold my RTX 2060 Super yesterday. Now i am on HD 4850 512MB GDDR3 until RTX 3000 comes out. Needed a break from gaming anyways. Hoping to get RTX 3080.:clap:
Burnout or other reasons? Cos I'm having a hard time defeating addiction lol.
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#17
ymbaja
DuxCroI sold my RTX 2060 Super yesterday. Now i am on HD 4850 512MB GDDR3...
Hey I’ve got one of those - might be the 1GB version though. Had to oven bake that sucker like 10 times so far but it’s still kicking.:D
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#18
Frick
Fishfaced Nincompoop
I got VIA flashbacks from the headline.
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#19
BiggieShady
phanbueyThey have 1 fan fighting against the PCB and some side fins with no direct airflow to cool the main PCB portion of the card. Unless the PCB fan is doing most of the cooling on the GPU...
PCB is short and heat sink with all pipes and fins extends to allow second fan unrestricted flow, only one fan fights against PCB as opposed to both fans doing so... so there's a win, downside would be crammed VRM section that requires special cooling treatment
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#20
phanbuey
BiggieShadyPCB is short and heat sink with all pipes and fins extends to allow second fan unrestricted flow, only one fan fights against PCB as opposed to both fans doing so... so there's a win, downside would be crammed VRM section that requires special cooling treatment
Makes sense... so heatsink 2 is actually doing the large majority of the cooling.
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#21
AltCapwn
phanbueyMakes sense... so heatsink 2 is actually doing the large majority of the cooling.
They just aren't using a typical intake - exhaust cooling setup. But yeah I'm curious to see the temp graph for those cards.
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#22
DStealth
pci-e cables plugged on the short side isn't the brightest idea for already 30cm card too...let alone the cooling :)
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#23
Chrispy_
_JP_Cleaning dust and exchanging TIM on this will be fun...
I think anyone who bought a 20-series FE will not make that mistake again.
  • Near-impossible disassembly that requires breaking seals and reglueing parts back together
  • Extremely dense fin stack that clogs up with dust exceptionally quickly
  • No idle fan stop, coupled with extremely high idle-RPM of 1500RPM that is not just audible, but louder than some of the compeition at load!
Yeah, Nvidia have lost their reputation for making good coolers.
The 900-series and 10-series blowers were excellent (for blowers) and a decent reference blower is important because the AIB's don't bother.
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#24
ZoneDymo
ymbajaHey I’ve got one of those - might be the 1GB version though. Had to oven bake that sucker like 10 times so far but it’s still kicking.:D
I used an HD6950 till like 2 years ago and that is now sitting in my sister's PC.
My mother has an HD4650 in it and working just fine.
And a friend is using still and HD7950 as her gaming card to this day :P

Just solid stuff all around really, very reliable.
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#25
BiggieShady
phanbueyMakes sense... so heatsink 2 is actually doing the large majority of the cooling.
There's still much speculation for some reason, and we should know more this close to launch... people are guessing, for example this image from reddit
This shows two pcb-s and two heatsinks (gpu and power delivery) ... it may be right given the position of the power connectors. Foreground heatsink doesn't have to be in two parts though (it may cool gpu with the help of the second fan given the size of power pcb).
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