Tuesday, October 6th 2020

Intel to Debut 500-series Chipset with Core "Rocket Lake-S," Which Launches Late-Q1 2021?

Intel will debut its 500-series desktop motherboard chipset series with its 11th Gen Core "Rocket Lake-S" desktop processors. A leaked alleged roadmap slide possibly from a presentation targeting an Intel ecosystem partner, reveals that the 500-series chipset will debut no sooner than March 2021, which could also mean "Rocket Lake-S" chips themselves could launch around that time, since Intel tends to launch new processor generations alongside new chipsets that are compatible out of the box. Even the 9th Generation "Coffee Lake Refresh" was accompanied by new Z390 and B365 chipsets. That said, Socket LGA1200 motherboards based on the existing 400-series chipset are expected to be compatible with "Rocket Lake-S," with BIOS updates. 500-series chipset motherboards might also support older 10th Gen Core "Comet Lake-S" processors.

The roadmap slide reveals that "Rocket Lake-S" could debut with strictly client-segment chipsets, such as the Z590 targeting overclockers, H570 targeting premium desktops, B560 targeting mid-range desktops, and H510 for entry-level desktops. Later in April, Intel could debut the Q570 chipset for commercial desktops, and W580 for workstations. What sets the 500-series chipset apart from the 400-series, appears to be a standardization of PCI-Express Gen 4, at least for the main PEG slot. Certain premium 400-series chipset motherboards already come with preparation for PCIe Gen 4 PEG. The "Rocket Lake-S" processor sees the first IPC increase by Intel on the desktop platform in five years, as the 14 nm chips are expected to feature new "Cypress Cove" CPU cores, which are a back-port of "Willow Cove" for the older 14 nm process. The chips could also feature a Gen12 Xe iGPU.
Sources: HD-Tecnologia, VideoCardz
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18 Comments on Intel to Debut 500-series Chipset with Core "Rocket Lake-S," Which Launches Late-Q1 2021?

#1
DeathtoGnomes
almost right on time for a new board every so many years
Posted on Reply
#2
dicktracy
Rocket Lake and then Alderlake in the same year? RTX 3090 won’t be bottlenecked for long. :)
Posted on Reply
#3
_Flare
Rocket Lake has a "similar to Icelake" CPU, backported to a 14nm process, coupled with Gen12 graphics (most likely 10nm) wich should be on an other die on the same package.
It uses only big cores, so no atom or hybrid aproach.
Alder Lake is a kind of successor to Lakefield experiment done with 1 Icelake core coupled with a quad Tremont (atom) cluster, wich resulted in a bunch of missing features for the Icelake Core (like SMT and AVX) because afaik all OSes can only work with a hybrid-cpu only when the features are the same, but maybe that changes in the future.

videocardz.com/newz/intel-alder-lake-s-cpu-with-16-cores-and-32-threads-leaks-on-sisoftware-benchmark-website
The SiSoft Sandra screenshot shows 16 Cores and 24 Threads (the 32 Threads headline is likely wrong), wich suggests that somehow the 8 big cores are cappable of SMT, but the 2 little quadcore-clusters don´t.
The 10 time 1.25MB L2 is made of 1 for each (Golden Cove, newer than Tiger Lakes Willow Cove) big core and 1 time for each of the two gracemont (atom) quadcore-clusters.
So somehow the newer hybrid-cpu can use divergent featuresets for big and little, i guess some clever updates where inevitable for that to come real.
cdn.wccftech.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/12/2018_ArchitectureDay_RonakSinghal_FINAL-MB-page-017.jpg
For Gracemont vector performance update is noted, wich could be AVX but that would kind of contradict the mindset of a power and area efficient core design wich the atom line kind of stands for.
Posted on Reply
#4
Anymal
14nm? Not so little, very too late.
Posted on Reply
#5
Gungar
Anymal
14nm? Not so little, very too late.
Well, if Intel wasn't FAR behind their own schedule, Ryzen CPUs would have just been another FX series.
Posted on Reply
#6
Grigor
wonder how many core will be featured
Posted on Reply
#7
_Flare
yeah, looks like Golden Cove will be the first retail 10nm desktop core of intel, but Alder Lake seems to have pure big core options also. But for me thats all in distant furture.
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#8
Vayra86
Its okay Intel, you keep fiddling about doing as you do.

We'll just upgrade to Ryzen in the meantime, no harm done.
Posted on Reply
#9
john_
dicktracy
Rocket Lake and then Alderlake in the same year? RTX 3090 won’t be bottlenecked for long. :)
Just wait about 24 hours and we might get some benchmarks with Zen 3 from AMD's presentation.
Posted on Reply
#10
bonehead123
Sooooo

Exactly how many "++" symbols should we use this time when talking about da Rocket ???

Wouldn't it just be simpler to use 14nm "to the 2nd/3rd/4th etc power" indicators now instead, hahahaha ..:roll:..:D..:fear:
Posted on Reply
#11
BorisDG
My X299 will be still revelant next year. Interesting and cool :)
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#12
Bubster
another 6 months to wait for pci e gen 4...Intel is a badly run company...more fortune for AMD
Posted on Reply
#13
BorisDG
Bubster
another 6 months to wait for pci e gen 4...Intel is a badly run company...more fortune for AMD
It's pointless at that point. Why you even bother? Probably 2022/2023 you will see heavy usage.
Posted on Reply
#14
efikkan
bonehead123
Sooooo
Exactly how many "++" symbols should we use this time when talking about da Rocket ???
14nm, 14nm+ and 14nm++ denotes node iterations, not design iterations. Rocket Lake will still use 14nm++.
Posted on Reply
#15
geof40
Considering you can barely even find a 10900k it is right on time for next Christmas.
Posted on Reply
#16
B-Real
dicktracy
Rocket Lake and then Alderlake in the same year? RTX 3090 won’t be bottlenecked for long. :)
You mean Zen 3? :) If the leaks are true about the single thread uplift, well.... :D BTW, who on earth uses a 3090 in FHD? Except for nobody. :D
Posted on Reply
#17
DeathtoGnomes
efikkan
14nm, 14nm+ and 14nm++ denotes node iterations, not design iterations. Rocket Lake will still use 14nm++.
This kind of math does not add up to 10mm!
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