Monday, March 8th 2021

Intel "Lunar Lake" Microarchitecture Hits the Radar, Possible "Meteor Lake" Successor

Intel published Linux kernel driver patches that reference a new CPU microarchitecture, codenamed "Lunar Lake." The patch comments refer to "Lunar Lake" as a client platform, and VideoCardz predicts that it could succeed "Meteor Lake." the microarchitecture that follows "Alder Lake," which was recently announced by Intel.

Targeting both mobile and desktop platforms, "Alder Lake" will herald a new 1,700-pin LGA socket for the client desktop, and debut hybrid CPU cores on the form-factor. Expected to be built on a newer silicon fabrication node, such as the 10 nm SuperFin, the chip will combine high-performance "Golden Cove" big cores, with "Gracemont" low-power cores. Its commercial success will determine if Intel continues to take the hybrid-core approach to client processors with future "Meteor Lake" and "Lunar Lake," or whether it will have sorted out its foundry woes and build "Lunar Lake" with a homogeneous CPU core type. With "Alder Lake" expected to debut toward the end of 2021 and "Meteor Lake" [hopefully] by 2022, "Lunar Lake" would only follow by 2023-24.
Sources: VideoCardz, OSOUL.org (Driver Patch)
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11 Comments on Intel "Lunar Lake" Microarchitecture Hits the Radar, Possible "Meteor Lake" Successor

#1
INSTG8R
Vanguard Beta Tester
This Big/Little approach is a real dice roll for Intel but apparently they’re feeling lucky.
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#2
LutinChris
So many Lake in just three years without anything new. Intel is now an imitator company (like they used to call AMD, except now Intel copies AMD and Apple. intel also became a silicon refresh expert!
Thanks to competition (AMD & Apple) for real innovation in the CPU market which is now more interesting for customers.
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#3
ZoneDymo
INSTG8R
This Big/Little approach is a real dice roll for Intel but apparently they’re feeling lucky.
I like the idea though, it will.require a lot of coordination with the OS but imagine alllll those background tasks being done on the little cores, heck maybe entire (small) programmes running on them.
I just don't know yet what those little cores are equivalent to in terms of speed.
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#4
INSTG8R
Vanguard Beta Tester
ZoneDymo
I like the idea though, it will.require a lot of coordination with the OS but imagine alllll those background tasks being done on the little cores, heck maybe entire (small) programmes running on them.
I just don't know yet what those little cores are equivalent to in terms of speed.
Exactl!y!The OS will probably need a significant update to handle it but yeah, your example is the “ideal” if it works
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#5
CheapMeat
I really hope it's successful. I like the idea and approach on desktop too.
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#6
Vayra86
LutinChris
So many Lake in just three years without anything new. Intel is now an imitator company (like they used to call AMD, except now Intel copies AMD and Apple. intel also became a silicon refresh expert!
Thanks to competition (AMD & Apple) for real innovation in the CPU market which is now more interesting for customers.
What is the use of linking a game comparison that loads the GPU, to compare CPUs and bring it to an Intel topic?

You're so off the mark... And you're correct otherwise, but how does that video illustrate anything?

If anything it shows Intel now offers i7 perf in an i3 package... Isn't that progress?
LutinChris
Thanks to competition (AMD & Apple) for real innovation in the CPU market which is now more interesting for customers.
Also missing where Intel is copying Apple. Big.little was borrowed from ARM and Intel's entire problem is that they can't really copy AMD yet. If they had, say 5 years ago, they'd have a product now that could compete in enterprise/server.
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#7
Tartaros
INSTG8R
This Big/Little approach is a real dice roll for Intel but apparently they’re feeling lucky.
Works fine in arm, I don't see why it shouldn't on x86 and is pretty much what has been on computing since its dawn. Getting a general use cpu to function similar to that to handle certain tasks at a lower energy consumption and/or reduced speed is nothing new, that's what a microcontroller is.
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#8
INSTG8R
Vanguard Beta Tester
Tartaros
Works fine in arm, I don't see why it shouldn't on x86 and is pretty much what has been on computing since its dawn. Getting a general use cpu to function similar to that to handle certain tasks at a lower energy consumption and/or reduced speed is nothing new, that's what a microcontroller is.
Yes but Windows would have to “learn” how to use it properly. It’s definitely gonna need a different CPU scheduler optimized to use the Big/Little properly. I’m sure it’s not difficult but it’s definitely a completely “new” way of doing things in the PC space.
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#9
Tartaros
INSTG8R
Yes but Windows would have to “learn” how to use it properly. It’s definitely gonna need a different CPU scheduler optimized to use the Big/Little properly. I’m sure it’s not difficult but it’s definitely a completely “new” way of doing things in the PC space.
At some point they had to do it. Even we might get better use for multithreading now.
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#10
INSTG8R
Vanguard Beta Tester
Tartaros
At some point they had to do it. Even we might get better use for multithreading now.
I agree if it works right it will be definite “leap” for desktop,PCs For laptops it would be ideal for power/battery life and thermals which has always been their shortcoming.
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#11
Wirko
INSTG8R
Yes but Windows would have to “learn” how to use it properly. It’s definitely gonna need a different CPU scheduler optimized to use the Big/Little properly. I’m sure it’s not difficult but it’s definitely a completely “new” way of doing things in the PC space.
Microsoft has had good learning tools at their disposal for more than a year now: the SQ1/SQ2 and the 8cx.
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