Thursday, May 6th 2021

Kingston Technology DDR5 Overclockable Modules One Step Closer to Reaching Market

Kingston Technology Company, Inc., a world leader in memory products and technology solutions, today announced it has sent overclockable DDR5 modules to its motherboard partners to begin qualification on the next-generation memory platform. Kingston engineered its DDR5 modules with a preset XMP profile, but also enabled our motherboard partners to manually adjust the power management integrated circuit (PMIC) beyond the 1.1 V DDR5 spec, thus allowing maximum flexibility to overclock. Kingston expects to ship its DDR5 solutions in Q3.

Memory validation requires cooperation of the entire computing ecosystem, and Kingston has forged close ties with the leading motherboard manufacturers and chipset makers throughout its 33-year history. This step continues the critical process of bringing leading high-performance and overclockable memory solutions to market later this year.
For over three decades, Kingston has meticulously engineered and has 100% tested every cell on every chip on every module. The methodical testing combined with a lifetime warranty and unmatched customer service has made Kingston the largest third-party memory manufacturer in the world, with over 80% market share. Kingston has also been a longtime member of JEDEC, the governing entity for the microelectronics industry. For over a decade, Kingston has held a seat on the JEDEC board as well, helping set the standards for which all manufacturers follow.
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13 Comments on Kingston Technology DDR5 Overclockable Modules One Step Closer to Reaching Market

#1
ixi
Yes, please! Can't wait to get hands on ddr5.
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#2
PilleniusMC
Oh man, DDR5 is going to be fun, though I won't have my hand on the overclockable UDIMMs... but I am planning on using it for a home server, which is going to be fun.
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#3
Octopuss
I guess I don't understand. What's the big deal? You can overclock any memory just fine.
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#4
PilleniusMC
OctopussI guess I don't understand. What's the big deal? You can overclock any memory just fine.
DDR5 base tech throws a lot of concepts we currently have overboard, so it is a bit special as the transparent on die ECC needs to keep up.
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#5
docnorth
Finally, more and more positive news about DDR5.
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#6
Gungar
The famous DDRX modules that Kingston never produced! Marketing is really magical!
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#7
Wirko
PilleniusMCDDR5 base tech throws a lot of concepts we currently have overboard, so it is a bit special as the transparent on die ECC needs to keep up.
DDR5 is also always registered (buffered), and the buffers need to keep up, too. They also add a little latency.
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#8
PilleniusMC
WirkoDDR5 is also always registered (buffered), and the buffers need to keep up, too. They also add a little latency.
Huh, I actually didn't see that in the specification before, and comparing to older versions I can also not seem to find it... could you point me to where I can find that info, because it'd actually interest me.
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#9
Wirko
PilleniusMCHuh, I actually didn't see that in the specification before, and comparing to older versions I can also not seem to find it... could you point me to where I can find that info, because it'd actually interest me.
en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/DDR5_SDRAM

"All DDR5 DIMMs are registered"
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#10
PilleniusMC
Wirkoen.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/DDR5_SDRAM

"All DDR5 DIMMs are registered"
I can only find info on the RCD on RDIMM and LRDIMM module specifications for DDR5 aside from Wikipedia (so Rambus, Montage, Micron, and so on). And on Wikipedia that claim is missing citation, so it feels a bit weird. But it seems this is a situation where information got lost on the way, because the original info seems to come from something Rambus published, which was talking about RDIMMs and LRDIMMs for servers.
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#11
Wirko
PilleniusMCI can only find info on the RCD on RDIMM and LRDIMM module specifications for DDR5 aside from Wikipedia (so Rambus, Montage, Micron, and so on). And on Wikipedia that claim is missing citation, so it feels a bit weird. But it seems this is a situation where information got lost on the way, because the original info seems to come from something Rambus published, which was talking about RDIMMs and LRDIMMs for servers.
I see. Several sources mention UDIMMs, and the maximum unbuffered module size is known - it's 128 GB. So Wikipedia is conditionally right, which means wrong.

www.anandtech.com/show/15912/ddr5-specification-released-setting-the-stage-for-ddr56400-and-beyond
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#12
Dave65
Wonders what pricing will be..
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#13
Prima.Vera
Looking forward for those 8GHz modules as promised...
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