Saturday, May 22nd 2021

AMD Socket AM5 an LGA of 1,718 Pins with DDR5 and PCIe Gen 4

A reliable source with AMD and NVIDIA leaks, ExecutableFix has shared some interesting bits of early information on AMD's next-generation Socket AM5. Apparently this will be AMD's first mainstream-desktop socket that does away with pins on the processor package, shifting them to the motherboard, in a Land Grid Array (LGA) format. This won't be AMD's first client LGA, though, as it was the Quad FX platform from 2006, which used a pair of Socket F LGAs. Socket AM5 will have a pin-count of 1,718 pins, 18 more than Intel's upcoming Socket LGA1700, on which its 12th Gen Core "Alder Lake-S" is expected to be based.

AMD will give the I/O of its client desktop platform a major update, with the introduction of DDR5 memory. Socket AM5 processors are expected to feature a dual-channel DDR5 memory interface. With Intel "Alder Lake-S" implementing DDR5, too, you now know why every major memory manufacturer is unveiling their first DDR5 U-DIMM product development. Interestingly, the PCI-Express interface on Socket AM5 will remain PCI-Express 4.0, even though PCI-Express 5.0 is being rumored for "Alder Lake-S." The switch to PCI-Express 5.0 may not be significant from a graphics cards perspective immediately, but paves the way for next-gen M.2 NVMe SSDs with double the transfer-rates of current drives that use PCI-Express 4.0. AMD is developing the new 600-series chipset to do with its next-generation Socket AM5 processors.
Source: ExecutableFix (Twitter)
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138 Comments on AMD Socket AM5 an LGA of 1,718 Pins with DDR5 and PCIe Gen 4

#1
KarymidoN
lets just hope they can make enough of this so we can actually buy it atleast at MSRP
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#2
Caring1
I hope the pins are sturdier than Intel's.
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#3
srsbsns
PCIE 5.0 is for DirectStorage
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#4
cyberloner
KarymidoNlets just hope they can make enough of this so we can actually buy it atleast at MSRP
msrp IS FAKE now........ all price will UP
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#5
RealKGB
Oh crap.
Now there will be people who go "AMD TO INTEL SOCKET ADAPTER?!?!?!" more frequently.
Also, AMD, please make your socket pins more durable.
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#6
newtekie1
Semi-Retired Folder
Caring1I hope the pins are sturdier than Intel's.
LGA pins are LGA pins. At least they are less likely to get damaged than pins on the CPU. I'm so glad AMD is finally moving to LGA for their mainstream desktop processors.
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#7
erocker
*
newtekie1LGA pins are LGA pins. At least they are less likely to get damaged than pins on the CPU. I'm so glad AMD is finally moving to LGA for their mainstream desktop processors.
I find damaging socket pins easier. But 1718 pins on a PGA I'd probably end up messing up too.
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#8
Nanochip
One cooler mount for AM5 or LGA1700?
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#9
Xex360
Hopefully they'll make the CPUs more secure, it's annoying to have the CPU stuck to the cooler.
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#10
z1n0x
NanochipOne cooler mount for AM5 or LGA1700?
AMD=Intel, Illuminati confirmed.
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#11
watzupken
Xex360Hopefully they'll make the CPUs more secure, it's annoying to have the CPU stuck to the cooler.
I agree. If they can make a locking mechanism like what Intel is utilising now, that will be great to avoid mishaps when removing the cooler.

As to pin, I don't know how they can make it sturdier to be honest. First the pins are very fine, and at the same time, they are made with metal with high conductivity that also tends to be softer. Instead, I think one can exercise some care when handling them. I've DIYed and fixed a lot of computers for 2 over decades, and have not damaged the pin whether its an Intel or AMD processor used..
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#12
Soulander
DDR5 8gb = U$100
Ryzen 6600 = $400
Ryzen 6700 = $500-550
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#13
voltage
AMD = After other Manufacturers Do it. When will they be first to create their own new technology, Never!

They cant even come up with their own product naming scheme. :roll:
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#14
GoldenX
No word on heatsink compatibility...
voltageAMD = After other Manufacturers Do it. When will they be first to create their own new technology, Never!

They cant even come up with their own product naming scheme. :roll:
You are using AMD64 right now, even on an Intel CPU.
Ignorant shills...
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#15
mclaren85
I don't think the pins quality depends on Intel or AMD. It depends on board manufacturer.
But.. I have never understood why they abandon PGA socket?
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#16
windwhirl
voltageWhen will they be first to create their own new technology, Never!
The x86-64 specification was AMD's work.

No need to shill on a news piece about a socket change.
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#17
DeathtoGnomes
Its a shame they are gonna use PCI4, if intel does go PCI5, AMD will be under the gun to push it too.
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#18
ZoneDymo
aww, I liked them being PGA just to differentiate, oh well
voltageAMD = After other Manufacturers Do it. When will they be first to create their own new technology, Never!

They cant even come up with their own product naming scheme. :roll:
like Intel using "glue" for their upcoming cpu's you mean?
or how Nvidia has adopted freesync?
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#19
DeathtoGnomes
ZoneDymoor how Nvidia has adopted freesync?
I must have missed that article.
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#20
silentbogo
Caring1I hope the pins are sturdier than Intel's.
RealKGBAlso, AMD, please make your socket pins more durable.
Tell that to foxconn. Also, it's helluvalot more pins, so if LGA1150 is easy to mess up, then this gold-plated bristle on a whooping 1718 pins is going to be even thinner and even less durable.

Now it's definitely a good time to get that IR rework station I was putting on a backburner for half-a-decade. Intel devotees have already developed some caution when installing CPUs yet still manage to f#$% it up every once in awhile, but with AMD moving to LGA I expect socket replacements to become my new thing ))) Already ordered a little batch of 115x and older AMx/FMx. By the time this new platform releases I'll have just enough time to practice and hone my skills :pimp:
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#21
ZoneDymo
DeathtoGnomesI must have missed that article.
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nvidia_G-Sync

"However, G-Sync compatible monitors that can utilize AMD's FreeSync can also be found.[10]"

"At CES 2019 Nvidia announced that they will support variable refresh rate monitors with FreeSync technology under a new standard named G-Sync Compatible. All monitors under this new standard have been tested by Nvidia to meet their baseline requirements for variable refresh rate and will enable G-Sync automatically when used with an Nvidia GPU.[14] However, users with any Freesync monitor, including those that are not officially certified may choose to enable the G-Sync option in the Nvidia Control Panel.[15] Unlike G-Sync, G-Sync Compatible displays are only compatible with the GTX 10-series and onwards. [16]"
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#22
Fouquin
silentbogoTell that to foxconn. Also, it's helluvalot more pins, so if LGA1150 is easy to mess up, then this gold-plated bristle on a whooping 1718 pins is going to be even thinner and even less durable.

Now it's definitely a good time to get that IR rework station I was putting on a backburner for half-a-decade. Intel devotees have already developed some caution when installing CPUs yet still manage to f#$% it up every once in awhile, but with AMD moving to LGA I expect socket replacements to become my new thing ))) Already ordered a little batch of 115x and older AMx/FMx. By the time this new platform releases I'll have just enough time to practice and hone my skills :pimp:
I would be surprised if pin pitch decreases. More likely package sizes will just increase. Neither AMD nor Intel have been pushing for sub-1mm pin pitch for their LGA sockets. It's just impractical to make manufacturing that much more difficult. So in essence nothing will change for anyone doing socket repairs. If you've handled Socket F/C32, G34, 4094, 1567, 2011, 2066, 3647, 115x and friends, and still managed to get through than don't expect that things will be worse.
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#23
Tom Yum
Xex360Hopefully they'll make the CPUs more secure, it's annoying to have the CPU stuck to the cooler.
I've never had that issue if I run the PC for 5 minutes before hand to heat the thermal paste or gum up, power down, disconnect the heatsink and give the heatsink a slight twist before lifting off. If you let the thermal paste cool then yeah, it can be like glue, likewise if you don't twist the heatsink first to break any vacuum seal.
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#24
silentbogo
FouquinI would be surprised if pin pitch decreases. More likely package sizes will just increase.
Maybe, maybe not. More pins still means higher chance of messing it up. The only reason you don't see it on server and workstation boards that often is because normally you have at least semi-skilled people performing the assembly, all under an immense pressure of f#$%ing up very expensive board. Introduce it to gen. pop., and you get human factor in all its glory.
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#25
las
srsbsnsPCIE 5.0 is for DirectStorage
No. DS works on 3.0 and up.
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