Wednesday, August 25th 2021

Intel Core i7-12700 Geekbenched, Matches Ryzen 7 5800X

Intel's upcoming Core i7-12700 (non-K) processor matches AMD's Ryzen 7 5800X in the Geekbench 5 benchmark. The i7-12700 is a locked 65 W TDP processor with 8 "Golden Cove" P-cores, and 4 "Gracemont" E-cores. 4 fewer E-cores, lower clocks, and lack of features such as Thermal Velocity Boost, is what differentiates the 12th Gen Core i7 from 12th Gen Core i9.

The Core i7-12700 allegedly scored 1595 points single-thread, along with 10170 points in the multi-threaded test. This puts it within 5% of the Ryzen 7 5800X in the single-threaded test (averaged from the Geekbench database), and within 2% in the multi-threaded. One has to consider that the i7-12700 lacks an unlocked multiplier, but should Intel 600-series chipset motherboards come with the same power-limit unlocks as the 400-series and 500-series; more performance can be squeezed out.
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73 Comments on Intel Core i7-12700 Geekbenched, Matches Ryzen 7 5800X

#1
ZoneDymo
guess geekbench cant see the eco cores? it indicating 8 cores and 16 threads?
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#2
Hossein Almet
If peak power consumption is below 100W and cheaper than the 5800X, I will consider.
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#3
silentbogo
"Matches" is the keyword, meaning they are still catching up. With supposed 125W TDP it has no technical advantages at all (we're yet to see any tangible benefits of Big-Little in desktops), so the only way to get back into the game is to lowball the price.
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#4
Dammeron
Oh wow, CPU that's gonna be ~1,5 years younger is gonna score better / offer better effieciency / cost less for the same performance (choose what You want).

What a surprise...
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#5
Jill Christine Valentine
S.T.A.R.S.
DammeronOh wow, CPU that's gonna be ~1,5 years younger is gonna score better / offer better effieciency / cost less for the same performance (choose what You want).

What a surprise...
Totally agree. Those should be compared to equivalent (the upcoming Zen 4) instead of the "old" Zen 3 if you want to have a fair comparison.
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#6
londiste
silentbogoWith supposed 125W TDP
Non-K models are usually 65W TDP.
Jill ValentineTotally agree. Those should be compared to equivalent (the upcoming Zen 4) instead of the "old" Zen 3 if you want to have a fair comparison.
Alder Lake will supposedly release at the end of this year. Zen4 CPUs will be released at the end of next year.
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#7
Fourstaff
Very good, etailers been bullying everyone with the pricing of AMD's chips. Hope competition comes back to take that ability off them.
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#8
watzupken
londisteNon-K models are usually 65W TDP.
Alder Lake will supposedly release at the end of this year. Zen4 CPUs will be released at the end of next year.
This is true, but the TDP don't mean anything nowadays, especially for Intel. I don't believe the chip will stay anywhere close to the 65W limit even after the boost period expires and under sustained load.

I am not sure if early benchmarks can utilise all the cores on Alder Lake because of the big/little core configuration, but current result don't look good at all. With 8 performance and 4 efficient cores, they are just keeping up with an 8 core 5800X is poor showing. The i7 should be competing with the Ryzen 9 5900X since it is the second highest end chip in Intel's range.
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#9
londiste
watzupkenThis is true, but the TDP don't mean anything nowadays, especially for Intel. I don't believe the chip will stay anywhere close to the 65W limit even after the boost period expires and under sustained load.
I have had several non-K Intel CPUs with 65W TDP. After the boost period expires they have stayed quite nicely at 65W. For non-K models motherboards seem to be more limited in how much they boost the PL2 and Tau, in my experience mostly the spec-ish 1.35x and 56s.
watzupkenThe i7 should be competing with the Ryzen 9 5900X since it is the second highest end chip in Intel's range.
Why? That depends entirely on the eventual price. 5900X is $550 CPU (and 5950X is an $800 CPU). Intel desktop range has been somewhat cheaper so far. Official prices have been $500 for 9900K, 10900K and $550 for 11900K. And everyone quite unanimously agrees that i9 is overpriced.

And for specific compared CPUs - 5800X is a $450 CPU. i7 11700/10700/9700 are $330.
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#10
docnorth
ZoneDymoguess geekbench cant see the eco cores? it indicating 8 cores and 16 threads?
Or maybe a version without economy cores at all?
watzupkenThis is true, but the TDP don't mean anything nowadays, especially for Intel. I don't believe the chip will stay anywhere close to the 65W limit even after the boost period expires and under sustained load.

I am not sure if early benchmarks can utilise all the cores on Alder Lake because of the big/little core configuration, but current result don't look good at all. With 8 performance and 4 efficient cores, they are just keeping up with an 8 core 5800X is poor showing. The i7 should be competing with the Ryzen 9 5900X since it is the second highest end chip in Intel's range.
Other benchmarks show the efficiency cores, this might be a CPU only with performance cores and/or restrained to Intel's official consumption values (cough cough).
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#11
ZoneDymo
docnorthOr maybe a version without economy cores at all?
doubt it, if anything the non-k sku's would go harder on eco cores, apart from that it would be pretty insane to still call something a 12700 if you remove the eco cores where the 12700k has 4 of them, that would be a lot of extra differences based on a letter being tagged on.

Last I dont think any cpu within alderlake will be launched without eco cores, its kinda what the entire new cpu design is about.
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#12
nguyen
FourstaffVery good, etailers been bullying everyone with the pricing of AMD's chips. Hope competition comes back to take that ability off them.
I was looking to buy 5900X at the beginning of the year and was told AMD distributor wanted retailers to sell Ryzen 5000 with bundles or nothing :kookoo:.
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#13
TheinsanegamerN
londisteI have had several non-K Intel CPUs with 65W TDP. After the boost period expires they have stayed quite nicely at 65W. For non-K models motherboards seem to be more limited in how much they boost the PL2 and Tau, in my experience mostly the spec-ish 1.35x and 56s.
Why? That depends entirely on the eventual price. 5900X is $550 CPU (and 5950X is an $800 CPU). Intel desktop range has been somewhat cheaper so far. Official prices have been $500 for 9900K, 10900K and $550 for 11900K. And everyone quite unanimously agrees that i9 is overpriced.

And for specific compared CPUs - 5800X is a $450 CPU. i7 11700/10700/9700 are $330.
Well rumors are pointing to the 12900k being a $650+ part. If those are true then the i9 will in fact be 5950x competition, or at least be at a major disadvantage to the 5900x.
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#14
SamSpend
Hossein AlmetIf peak power consumption is below 100W and cheaper than the 5800X, I will consider.
lower than 100w?I Think that is impossible
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#15
Mats
ZoneDymoguess geekbench cant see the eco cores? it indicating 8 cores and 16 threads?
The maximum thread count of 24 is probably for the 12900, I doubt the 12700 would have the same thread count. Comparing with Rocket Lake is not a good idea.
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#16
Tardian
MatsThe maximum thread count of 24 is probably for the 12900, I doubt the 12700 would have the same thread count. Comparing with Rocket Lake is not a good idea.
Intel Core i7-12700 non-K would offer 8 cores and 16 threads, a different configuration than the rumored i7-12700K CPU with 8 P-Cores, 4 E-Cores, and a total of 20 threads. This means that either the software is reading wrong values or Intel is now differentiating its K-series CPUs with higher specs.
The processor was reportedly running at 4789 MHz with a base clock at 2.1 GHz. An 8-core and 16-thread configuration suggests that Efficient Cores in this SKU are not enabled, so both clock speeds would be showing Performance Core frequencies.
videocardz.com/newz/intel-core-i7-12700-non-k-alder-lake-cpu-is-almost-as-fast-as-ryzen-7-5800x-in-leaked-geekbench-score
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#17
The Quim Reaper
ZoneDymoguess geekbench cant see the eco cores? it indicating 8 cores and 16 threads?
I doubt anything will until it's being run on Windows 11 with the new thread scheduler that Microsoft & intel have come up with for Alder-lake.
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#18
ZoneDymo
MatsThe maximum thread count of 24 is probably for the 12900, I doubt the 12700 would have the same thread count. Comparing with Rocket Lake is not a good idea.
The 12900 has 8 P-cores and 8 E-cores, 8 + 8 + 8 (hyperthreading on the P-cores) makes 24 threads.
The 12700 has 8 P-cores and 4 E-cores, 8 + 4 + 8 (hyperthreading on the P-cores) makes 20 threads, so yeah, wonder if it does not detect them for some reason.
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#19
Ellertis
I actually don't really trust there results, for one reason, even if Geekbench can't utilize the small cores, the big Golden cove cores should be more powerful, because of higher ipc and my guess almost same clocks at stock.
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#21
Punkenjoy
As some people reports, ADL do not have AVX512 on desktop and that mean have a bit slower total score than RKL. But the integer score is up by 10%. Far from the 19% promised but still.

We don't know if it's the final product or not yet.
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#22
Ellertis
I think something important to note is the power restriction : 65W vs 105W
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#23
Bomby569
It will all come down to pricing, unless you just want to shill for a company. I don't care you get's me the better value for my money, if it's Intel i'm fine with it.
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#24
freeagent
Haters gonna hate I guess. I am looking forward to new gen Intel. I might not buy it, but the choice is there as long as I have the money :D

If this was the bump they needed for progression, I cant fault them for trying.
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#25
Ellertis
freeagentHaters gonna hate I guess. I am looking forward to new gen Intel. I might not buy it, but the choice is there as long as I have the money :D

If this was the bump they needed for progression, I cant fault them for trying.
I'm even more pumped with their next Gen coves and impressive ipc increases in the coming years, along with tile based cpus and of course small cores for scaling multi threading
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