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AMD to Release Ryzen 7 3750X Processor?

AMD's latest Product Master guide (since taken down but immortalized in the interweb) has a surprise in store for AMD's Ryzen 7 desktop CPU lineup. Sandwiched in-between the Ryzen 7 3700X and the Ryzen 7 3800X, a new entry has reared its head, in the form of the Ryzen 7 3750X. The new CPU is specified to keep the same 105 W TDP of its elder sibling Ryzen 7 3800X, instead of keeping the Ryzen 7 3700X's 65 W TDP. Technically, this is possible to achieve in both pricing and performance: the Ryzen 7 3750X, if it ever is launched (it could be a specific release for system integrators or other interested parties outside the usual mainstream desktop suspects) could sport increased base clocks compared to the Ryzen 7 3700X's 3.6 GHz base / 4.4 GHz boost clocks... But not easily, considering the Ryzen 7 3800X starts at 3.9 GHz base / 4.5 GHz boost. It's possible to release the 3750X with a 200 MHz boost on base clocks and the same 4.4 GHz boost, but does it make any sense to do so?

It could - even if with some forced optimism - should AMD price it closer to the Ryzen 7 3700X than to the Ryzen 7 3800X. The $329 and $399 prices for those CPUs, respectively, leave a gap that could be filled by the Ryzen 7 3750X at around the $349 mark, for example. It's likely most users would be making the jump from the 65 W CPU than dropping less cash compared to the 3800X, so AMD's margins per sale would definitely improve. At the same time, this could be a way for AMD to cope with TSMC's 7 nm increase in lead-times and lower availability of CPUs by moving stock from the 65 W CPU to the pricier 3750X in parts that can actually run at those frequencies. Driving their lineup's ASP up ensures AMD can keep a steady stream of income should availability decline - less parts sold at a greater price can shore up some of the lost cash influx.

AMD Announces New Radeon Embedded E9000 Series GPU Models

The AMD Embedded business provides SoCs and discrete GPUs that enable casino gaming companies to create immersive and beautiful graphics for the latest in casino gaming platforms, which are adopting the same high-quality motion graphics and experiences seen in modern consumer gaming devices. AMD Embedded provides casino and gaming customers a breadth of solutions to drive virtually any gaming system. The AMD Ryzen Embedded V1000 SoC brings CPU and GPU technology together in one package, providing the capability to run up to four 4K displays from one system. The AMD Ryzen Embedded R1000 SoC is a power efficient option while providing up to 4X better CPU and graphics performance per dollar than the competition.

Beyond SoCs, AMD also offers embedded GPUs to enable stunning, immersive visual experiences while supporting efficient thermal design power (TDP) profiles. AMD delivers three discrete GPU classes to customers with the AMD Embedded Radeon ultra-high-performance embedded GPUs, the AMD Embedded Radeon high-performance embedded GPUs and the AMD Embedded Radeon power-efficient embedded GPUs. These three classes enable a wide range of performance and power consumption, but most importantly offer features that the embedded industry demands including planned longevity, enhanced support and support for embedded operating systems.

AMD Launches Ryzen 9 3900 and Ryzen 5 3500X Processors

AMD Tuesday expanded its 3rd generation Ryzen desktop processor lineup with two new product additions, the 12-core/24-thread Ryzen 9 3900, and the 6-core/12-thread Ryzen 5 3500X. Both chips are particularly interesting given their naming. The 3900 is a slightly subdued twin of the company's current flagship, the 3900X, with a small amount of clock speed traded off for a huge drop in TDP. This chip ticks at 3.10 GHz with 4.30 GHz boost, compared to 3.80/4.60 GHz frequencies of the 3900X. Its TDP, however, is rated at just 65 W, compared to 105 W of the 3900X. You get 512 KB of dedicated L2 cache per core, and 64 MB of L3 cache.

The Ryzen 5 3500X is another interesting part, in which the "X" makes a world of difference from the Ryzen 5 3500. Whilst the 3500 is a 6-core/6-thread part devoid of SMT, the 3500X is 6-core/12-thread (features SMT), has the same exact 3.60 GHz nominal clocks as the popular Ryzen 5 3600, but a slightly lower 4.10 GHz boost frequency, compared to 4.20 GHz of the 3600. The Ryzen 5 3500X is expected to be marginally cheaper than the 3600, at around $189, and is currently only being offered to OEMs and system integrators in China. The company hasn't finalized pricing for the 3900, yet.

New Information on Intel's Upcoming i9-9900KS Processor Outed - 127 W TDP

Intel's upcoming 5 GHz-on-all-cores Core i9-9900KS will certainly be a beast of a processor for the company - in more ways than one. The 8-core, 16-thread 5 5 GHz all-core turbo CPU will be Intel's best-performing consumer CPU for a while. The steps taken to ensure that have been the only ones Intel could do with their current CPU design and fabrication process - increase the TDP and improve all-core boost frequency, which should allow the CPU to perform incredibly well in peak performance.

The question that remains, of course, is how long the CPU will actually be able to keep its 5.0 GHz all-core frequency when it's engaged. The 127 W TDP as outed by an ASUS BIOS is a monstrous amount for an 8-core CPU, and I don't envy the heatsinks that will have to keep it in check. All in all, this seems to be nothing more than a CPU binned for Intel's purposes of becoming the best CPU for gaming and "home user relevant applications".

Intel's Energy-Efficient Core i9-9900T Pops up on Geekbench 4

We originally covered Intel's work on the (more) energy-efficient version of their Core i9-9900 processor back in January. However, it seems that the company has improved the i9-9900T's performance before final release. Initial specifications for the processor were expected to deliver a 1.70 GHz base clock (down from 3.60 GHz of the original i9-9900K), with 1~2 core Turbo Boost frequency down to 3.80 GHz. However, the Geekbench benchmarks show a different story, one that's much more appealing to users: Intel managed to keep the 35 W TDP target, but base clocks stand at a much more interesting 2.1 GHz and much improved Boost clocks of 4.4 GHz.

This is good news, as performance is sure to be better than initially expected. However, this seems like a necessary move from Intel - AMD's Ryzen 3000 processors would be staring hungrily to Intel's 9900T otherwise (and likely still are). The eight cores, 16 threads, 16 MB of cache and Intel UHD Graphics 630 are kept from the original part. The test scores pitting it against an Intel i9-9900KS show an expected drop in performance compared to the faster processor. The Core i9-9900T has an Intel-set pricing of $439.

AMD Readies Ryzen 9 3950X 16-core Processor to Awestrike Crowds at E3

When AMD launched its Ryzen 9 3900X 12-core/24-thread processor at its Computex 2019 keynote, our readers commented on the notable absence of a 16-core SKU, given that a "Matisse" multi-chip module with two 8-core "Zen 2" chiplets adds up to that core-count. Some readers noted this could be a case of AMD holding back its top performing part in the absence of competition in the segment from Intel. It turns out, the company was saving this part up for an E3 2019 unveiling.

The Ryzen 9 3950X maxes out "Matisse" MCM with 16 cores, 32 threads via SMT, a staggering 64 MB of L3 cache (72 MB including the 8 MB of total L2 cache), and a stunning 105-Watt TDP figure that's unchanged from the company's TDP for the 3900X. The Ryzen 9 3950X is clocked at 3.50 GHz, with a maximum boost frequency of 4.70 GHz. The company is yet to reveal its price, but given that the $499 price-tag has already been taken by the 3900X, one could expect an even higher price. It remains to be seen if the 3950X will launch alongside the rest of the series on 7/7.

Cryorig to Launch Graphene-Coated C7G CPU Cooler?

As of yet unannounced, it seems that Cryorig may be preparing to launch a graphene-coated version of their popular low-profile C7Cu cooler. Cryorig's own website has a product page up for the part, which makes use of graphene's qualities in both durability, lightness and thermal conductivity to increase performance in the part of the market it arguably matters the most - small form factor. This could signal an improvement in heat dissipation capabilities for this small cooler. The C7 Cu version, in full copper, has a 115W TDP specification, so perhaps the C7G will improve in that front.

The C7G FAQ isn't uploaded as of yet, which speaks to the unannounced nature of the product. The only thing we have to go by, for now, is the image for the product on Cryorig's product page, and the users' manual, which while not giving away much in terms of specifications, but does show that there are a pair of mounting clips included for users to mount their 90 mm fans - whether in 14 mm or 25 mm depth.

Lenovo Launches New ThinkPad Laptops Based on New AMD Ryzen PRO processors

Lenovo has released a trio of new Windows 10 laptops based on new, 2nd generation AMD Ryzen PRO processors, in their famous ThinkPad form factor. There are two models that are part of the T series of ThinkPads, while one is part of X series. For reminding, the T series is the flagship line that offers the best balance between ruggedness, features, processing power, and portability in a 14 or 15-inch unit, while the X series focuses on portability.

The new ThinkPads use the second generation of AMD Ryzen PRO processors, which are 12nm improvements of the previous 14nm Ryzen Family. They carry the 3000 name branding but are similar to the 2000 series of desktop CPUs.

Cooler Master Unveils TR4 Edition Variants of MasterLiquid ML RGB Series AIO Coolers

Cooler Master unveiled TR4 Edition variants of its MasterLiquid ML RGB line of all-in-one liquid CPU coolers, which include the ML240 RGB TR4 Edition and the ML360 RGB TR4 Edition. As the names suggest, these coolers support AMD socket SP3r2 aka TR4, and are designed for Ryzen Threadripper processors. The ML240 RGB TR4 Edition with its 240 mm x 120 mm radiator is recommended for models with 180W TDP, while its bigger sibling with a 360 mm x 120 mm radiator is recommended for 250W models, including the 32-core Threadripper 2990WX. Both models feature a designed pump-block with an enlarged rectangular copper base for better coverage of the Threadripper IHS, and retention module for the TR4 socket. The company logo on the pump-block and the included fans come with RGB LED lighting. Both models go on sale on 14th March, the company didn't reveal pricing.

Intel Rolls Out the 4 GHz Pentium Gold G5620 Processor

Intel rolled out its first Pentium-branded processor with 4.00 GHz clock-speed, the Pentium Gold G5620 (retail SKU: BX80684G5620). The chip replaces the G5600 on top of the entry-level product stack. Based on the 14 nm "Coffee Lake" microarchitecture, it packs a 2-core/4-thread CPU clocked at 4.00 GHz without Turbo Boost. 256 KB of L2 cache per core and 4 MB of shared L3 cache are also offered. The integrated graphics solution is Intel's workhorse UHD Graphics 630, with 24 execution units. The dual-channel DDR4 integrated memory controller supports up to 64 GB of DDR4-2400 memory. The chip's TDP is rated at 65W. Pricing is up in the air, with retail channel shortages expected to swing the chip on both sides of the $100-mark. Availability is slated for early-March, 2019.

Intel Core i9-9990XE OEM-only, Even Then it's a Lottery

In a sign of just how arid the DIY retail channel has become for Intel, Tom's Hardware reports that the new socket flagship LGA2066 HEDT processor model Intel sneaked into its product-stack, the Core i9-9990XE, is restricted to the OEM/SI (system integrator) channel. Even to OEMs, ordering a tray of i9-9990XE chips isn't as simple as ordering other chips, such as the i9-9900K. Apparently, Intel has been running secret online auctions that are OEM-only, for these chips. OEMs get to bid on the per-chip price in n-unit tray quantities.

Workstation integrator Puget Systems was able to score itself some i9-9990XE inventory at USD $2,300 per chip. Puget Systems last week received its first batch of chips from Intel, and released performance benchmarks. At this price, the i9-9990XE is being sold at a 21% premium over the retail-channel SEP price of the i9-9980XE, and a whopping 65% premium over the i9-9940X. Intel can't shake off comparisons between the i9-9990XE and the i9-9940X because both chips are 14-core/28-thread with 19.25 MB shared L3 cache, with the i9-9990XE only offering significantly higher clock-speeds, but at an astounding TDP of 255W. The i9-9990XE was shown beating the 18-core i9-9980XE in a variety of HEDT-relevant benchmarks.

Akasa Turing is an Art Deco Fanless "Bean Canyon" NUC Case

Akasa Turing is the company's latest fanless cases for Intel "Bean Canyon" NUC family, which embeds 8th generation Core "Coffee Lake" processors. Designed for living rooms or corner offices, the Turing is a carbon-black monolith with its aluminium body doubling up as heatsink for the processor. Fins and ridges of the body panel curve in an almost Art Deco style. You can either orient the case vertically, or sideways. The case can handle SoCs with TDP of up to 28 W without needing fans. Front panel connectivity includes a pair of USB 3.1 type-A, an IR receiver, and headset jack, while the rear panel is designed for most "Bean Canyon" boards. Akasa will reveal pricing very soon.

Intel Readies Energy-efficient 35-Watt Core i9-9900T Processor

Intel succeeded in bringing down the TDP of its 8-core/16-thread "Coffee Lake-Refresh" silicon all the way down to a staggering 35 W, from its currently rated 95 W, which in real-world usage easily exceeds 110 W, given Turbo Boost, and other performance enhancements enabled by DIY motherboards. The new Core i9-9900T achieves its TDP with a combination of significantly lower clock-speeds, and an aggressive on-die power-management system. Its nominal-clock is down to 1.70 GHz from 3.60 GHz of the original i9-9900K, while 1~2 core Turbo Boost frequency is down to 3.80 GHz from 5.00 GHz of the original. The all-core Turbo clock-speed could be as low as 3.30 GHz. Intel hasn't tinkered with the L3 cache amount, which is still set at 16 MB, and the UHD 630 iGPU retains its EU count and clock-speeds. The chip features its 4-character product code of QQC0.

Be Quiet Unveils Six New Products at CES 2019

Be Quiet invited us to its product unveil suite on the sidelines of CES 2019. The company unveiled six new products, most of which are variations or improvements of existing products in the company's stack. The lineup begins with Dark Base 700 White Edition, limited-edition (3,000 units) ATX mid-tower. The case combines all-white interiors with mostly-white exteriors, black mesh accents along the sides, with RGB LED embellishments, and clear tempered glass. The case retains the remaining feature-set from the Dark Base 700, and is expected to be priced at 189.95€.

Also shown here is a Dark Rock Slim 120 tower-type CPU cooler with a single fan. This cooler is rated to handle thermal loads of up to 180 W (TDP), and hence only supports mainstream-desktop CPU sockets such as LGA115x, AM4, and probably even LGA2066. The fin-stack features a high-clearance fin design that curves inward. Slated for Q2-2019, the cooled is expected to be priced around 50€. Three color variants of the company's existing fan lineup were shown, including matte-black and all-white variants of Shadow Wings 2, and a new high-RPM version of Pure Wings 2, with up to 1,600 RPM for the 140 mm variant, and up to 2,000 RPM for the 120 mm one. Available from January 2019 (later this month), prices of these fans could range between 12.50-13.90€.

Intel 10nm "Ice Lake" to Combine "Sunny Cove" CPU Cores with Gen11 iGPU

Intel's upcoming "Ice Lake" die could be the company's biggest processor innovation in a decade, combining new clean-slate design "Sunny Cove" CPU cores, and a new integrated graphics solution based on the company's Gen11 architecture. "Sunny Cove" introduces significant IPC (single-thread performance) gains over "Coffee Lake," introduces new ISA instruction sets, including AVX-512; and a brand new uncore component; while the Gen11 graphics core is Intel's first iGPU to reach the 1 TFLOP/s mark. Intel demonstrated the ultra-low power "Ice Lake-U" SoC platform in its 2018 Architecture Day briefing.

This "Ice Lake-U" chip, with its TDP in the ballpark of 15 W, was shown ripping through 7-zip and "Tekken 7." With 7-zip, Intel was trying to demonstrate vector-AES and SHA-NI improving archive encryption performance by 75 percent over "Skylake." The Gen11 iGPU was shown providing a smoother gameplay than Skylake with Gen9, although the company neither mentioned resolution, nor frame-rates. Anandtech wagers it's above 30 fps.

ENERMAX Launches LIQTECH II, Universal AIO Liquid Cooler with TDP 500+ Watts

ENERMAX, a leading designer and manufacturer of high-performance PC hardware products, announces the launch of a new all-in-one liquid cooler series, LIQTECH II. Responding the market demand of cooling solution for high-end CPUs, LIQTECH II can deliver enthusiast-grade cooling capacity of 500+ watts (TDP) and is compatible with both Intel and AMD sockets (except AMD sTR4).

Furthermore, certified by main motherboard makers (ASRock, ASUS, Gigabyte, and MSI), LIQTECH II can support the latest addressable RGB lighting synchronization with advanced motherboards featuring addressable RGB headers (pin assignment: 5V/D/-/G) to create dynamic visual effects. LIQTECH II is perfect for overclocked systems, image editing workstations, and high-end gaming machines.

Intel Readies "KF" Variants of Key 9th Gen Core Desktop SKUs

Intel is readying a curious-looking "KF" brand extension for key SKUs of its 9th generation Core "Coffee Lake Refresh" family. These SKUs include the Core i9-9900KF, the Core i7-9700KF, Core i5-9600KF, and the Core i3-9350KF. The source revealing slides from a GIGABYTE internal presentation mentioning these doesn't explain what "KF" means, but we've heard rumors on what "KF" could mean. The "K" in KF denotes that the processor features an unlocked base-clock multiplier. No points for guessing that one. The "F," however, could indicate a disabled or physically absent iGPU.

This won't be the first time that Intel has launched variants of its mainstream desktop premium SKUs with disabled iGPUs. Intel's reasons for doing so with "Coffee Lake Refresh" could be many, including harvesting dies with defective iGPU components. Physically absent iGPUs could only make sense from the perspective of increasing yields per wafer, as the dies could be around 15% smaller for the 8-core silicon, and 25% smaller for the 6-core silicon. It doesn't make sense from a purely TDP-optimization perspective, because Intel processors are capable of power-gating (and not just clock-gating) user-disabled iGPUs.

Raijintek Intros Juno Pro RBW Low-profile Air CPU Cooler

Raijintek today introduced the Juno Pro RBW, a low-profile air CPU cooler and successor to the Juno-X RGB from late-2017. While the Juno-X RGB only featured a multi-color fan strapped onto the original Juno-X heatsink, the new Juno Pro RBW features a more substantial redesign, with a metal shroud crowing the upper portion of the heatsink, and a silicone RGB LED diffuser ring framing the shroud. The lighting system conforms to the newer addressable-RGB standard, so you can control it using various motherboard branded lighting control software.

Under the hood, the heatsink is unchanged from the Juno-X: a radially-projecting aluminium fin-stack that's bunched up at the center, making up the base that makes contact with the CPU, which is ventilated by a 120 mm PWM fan that spins between 400 to 1,800 RPM, pushing up to 38.5 CFM of air, with a noise output of 28 dBA. Measuring 122.5 mm x 122.5 mm x 65 mm (WxDxH), it weighs 315 g. The cooler is capable of handling thermal loads of up to 105W TDP. Among the CPU sockets supported are LGA115x and AM4. The company didn't reveal pricing.

Apple's A12X Shows Us How The ARM MacBook Is Closer Than Ever

The shadow of a ARM-based MacBook has been there for years. Rumors have been adding up, and the performance of their own mobile processors is more and more convincing with each new generation of devices. The recent launch of the iPad Pro has reinforced those signs after knowing its Apple A12X Bionic' Geekbench 4 results. According to this benchmark, the new iPad Pro isn't that far in raw performance from what we have with a Core i9-8950HK-based MacBook Pro (2018). We have a Single-Core/Multi-Core score of 5020/18217 in the iPad Pro vs the 5627/21571 on the MacBook Pro. If this seems nuts it's because it really is.

This comparison is pretty absurd in itself: TDPs are quite different on both (7 W vs 45 W) but there are also important distinctions in areas such as the memory used in those devices (most Apple laptops still use DDR-2133 modules) and, of course, the operating system on which they are based. Those numbers are just a tiny reference, but if we pay attention to Apple's recent keynote, that Photoshop CC demo can really speak for itself. And again, comparisons are hateful, but let's look for a slightly fairer comparison.

TechPowerUp GPU-Z v2.12.0 Released

TechPowerUp GPU-Z v2.12.0 released today with useful new features and several stability updates. We worked extensively on the ability of GPU-Z to detect fake NVIDIA graphics cards (i.e cards not really having the GPU advertised on the box). GPU-Z now prepends "[FAKE]" to the Graphics Card name field, and lights up with a caution triangle. This capability is forward compatible for the supported GPUs (listed in the changelog), so for example, it will be able to detect a fake RTX 2060, which in reality uses a GK106 GPU. The second big feature is the ability to extract and upload graphics card BIOS of NVIDIA GeForce RTX 2000 graphics cards. Graphics cards with multiple independent fans (each with its own speed control) are gaining popularity, and we've added the ability to read and log fan-speeds of individual fans on NVIDIA "Turing" graphics cards that support the feature, in addition to fan speed percentage monitoring.

Our feature-rich "Advanced" tab now also shows information on HDMI and DisplayPort connectors of your graphics cards. Power-draw on NVIDIA graphics cards is now reported both as a percentage of TDP and as an absolute value in Watts. Among the bugs fixed are a system hang due to Valve Anti-Cheat (VAC) kicking in when GPU-Z is running in the background; memory bandwidth reading on RTX 2080 & RTX 2080 Ti with GDDR6 memory, AMD Radeon RX 400-series GPU utilization monitoring, and improved texts for system memory usage sensors.
DOWNLOAD: TechPowerUp GPU-Z v2.12.0

The change-log follows.

ZOTAC Prepping Another RTX 20-Series: AMP Extreme

ZOTAC is preparing to launch another tier to its GeForce RTX 20-series graphics cards lineup with the AMP Extreme series. Sitting above their now historic AMP Series (at least in computer hardware terms, it's already historic), the new lineup will bring much improved factory overclocking numbers, so these are certainly part of those cherry-picked chips for maximum performance. Core clocks aren't known at the time, but memory clocks have been upped to 14.4 Gbps, some 400 MHz above the factory specifications for the RTX 2080 - the only confirmed card until now.

The rest of the design is relatively straightforward, with a metallic backplate, a tri-90 mm fan design, 2x 8-pin power connectors, a 16+4 phases power delivery system, and a much increased TDP of 280 W (over the reference 215 W). Of course, there's RGB lighting as well, but that's not the important thing here: the cherry-picked chips are. It's unclear os of yet when this series will hit the market, but expect them sooner rather than later. ZOTAC is apparently also working on a AMP Core series, which should find its differentiation over the factory overclocking specifics.

AMD Announces 2nd Gen Ryzen Quad-core and Energy-Efficient Processor Models

AMD today announced the much-awaited 2nd generation Ryzen quad-core socket AM4 processors, in addition to two new E-series (energy-efficient) variants of its existing processor models. To begin with, the company announced the 4-core/8-thread Ryzen 5 2500X and the 4-core/4-thread Ryzen 3 2300X.

Unlike their predecessors that are carved out of the "Summit Ridge" silicon by disabling 2 cores per compute complex or CCX (2+2 CCX config), the 2500X and 2300X feature a 4+0 config, or an entire CCX in the "Pinnacle Ridge" silicon being disabled. This also means that the 2500X has just 8 MB of L3 cache (its predecessor has 16 MB). The 2300X is clocked at 3.50 GHz with 4.00 GHz boost, while the 2500X ticks at 3.60 GHz with 4.00 GHz boost. The TDP of both chips is rated at 65W.

AMD also released the "E" brand extension for its 2nd generation Ryzen series, with the new Ryzen 5 2600E, and the Ryzen 7 2700E. Both these chips sacrifice clock speeds for an impressive 45W TDP. The 2600E is clocked at 3.10 GHz, with 4.00 GHz (compared to 3.60 GHz ~ 4.20 GHz of the 2600X); while the 2700E ticks at 2.80 GHz, with 4.00 GHz boost (compared to 3.70 GHz ~ 4.30 GHz of the 2700X). The company didn't reveal pricing of the four chips.

AMD Readies 2nd Generation Ryzen Pro Socket AM4 Processors

AMD is readying its second generation Ryzen Pro socket AM4 processors targeted at commercial desktops in a corporate environment, with additional management and security features. These chips are based on the company's new 12 nm "Pinnacle Ridge" silicon. Its biggest differentiator from the other Ryzen SKUs is the GuardMI feature, which is a collective of Secure Memory Encryption, a hardened Secure Boot feature, Secure Production Environment (useful for big organizations that oversee the manufacturing of their hardware, and fTPM.

AMD's 2nd gen Ryzen Pro lineup initially includes three models: the 8-core/16-thread Ryzen 7 Pro 2700X, the Ryzen 7 Pro 2700, and the 6-core/12-thread Ryzen 5 Pro 2600. Some of these chips are clocked marginally lower than their non-Pro siblings. The Pro 2700X ticks at 3.60 GHz, with 4.10 GHz (vs. 3.70 to 4.30 GHz of the 2700X); while the Pro 2700 and Pro 2600 are clocked on par with its non-Pro counterparts. The decision behind clocking the Pro 2700X lower could have something to do with TDP, which is now 95W, compared to the 105W of the normal 2700X.

NVIDIA GTX 1080-successor a Rather Hot Chip, Reference Cooler Has Dual-Fans

The GeForce GTX 1080 set high standards for efficiency. Launched as a high-end product that was faster than any other client-segment graphics card at the time, the GTX 1080 made do with just a single 8-pin PCIe power connector, and had a TDP of just 180W. The reference-design PCB, accordingly, has a rather simple VRM setup. The alleged GTX 1080-successor, called either GTX 1180 or GTX 2080 depending on who you ask, could deviate from its ideology of extreme efficiency. There were telltale signs of this departure on the first bare PCB shots.

The PCB pictures revealed preparation for an unusually strong VRM design, given that this is an NVIDIA reference board. It draws power from a combination of 6-pin and 8-pin PCIe power connectors, and features a 10+2 phase setup, with up to 10 vGPU and 2 vMem phases. The size of the pads for the ASIC and no more than 8 memory chips confirmed that the board is meant for the GTX 1080-successor. Adding to the theory of this board being unusually hot is an article by Chinese publication Benchlife.info, which mentions that the reference design (Founders Edition) cooling solution does away with a single lateral blower, and features a strong aluminium fin-stack heatsink ventilated by two top-flow fans (like most custom-design cards). Given that NVIDIA avoided such a design for even big-chip cards such as the GTX 1080 Ti FE or the TITAN V, the GTX 1080-successor is proving to be an interesting card to look forward to. But then what if this is the fabled GTX 1180+ / GTX 2080+, slated for late-September?

Lenovo Confirms AMD Ryzen 3 2300X and Ryzen 5 2500X Specs

Lenovo put up an updated specs sheet of its ThinkCentre M725 small form-factor desktop, with more processor options. Notable additions to these include the upcoming AMD Ryzen 3 2300X and Ryzen 5 2500X quad-core socket AM4 processors. The two chips succeed the 1300X and 1500X, respectively, and are designed to capture sub-$150 price-points, competing with Intel's Core i3 "Coffee Lake" quad-core processor series. It's rumored that the 2300X could even be priced close to the $100-mark, making it competitive with the i3-8100, while the 2500X could be priced competitively with the i3-8300.

AMD is giving these quad-core chips all its innovations it can muster to make them competitive with Intel's chips - the two feature unlocked base-clock multipliers, Precision Boost (Intel's Core i3 chips lack Turbo Boost), and XFR 2.0, which automatically overclock beyond the max boost frequencies. You also get the latest Precision Boost 2.0 algorithm that ensures each of the four cores gets varying degrees of boost clocks. Based on the 12 nm "Pinnacle Ridge" die, the two chips feature a 2+2 CCX configuration. The 2300X has 4 MB of L3 cache enabled per CCX (8 MB total), while the 2500X gives you the full 8 MB per CCX L3 cache, for a total of 16 MB. TDP of both chips are rated at 65W, and AMD could bundle the Wraith Stealth cooler with the two.
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