Tuesday, September 28th 2021

Maximize Creative Potential with Logitech MX Keys Mini, a New Minimalist Wireless Keyboard

Today Logitech introduced the new MX Keys Mini and MX Keys Mini for Mac, keyboards designed for creators that pack more power into a minimalist wireless keyboard. MX Keys Mini offers the best features of the standard-sized MX Keys that consumers know and love, in a minimalist wireless keyboard designed for any space you work, whether a large designer desk in the studio or a home setup. Type with confidence, comfort and style on MX Keys Mini, crafted for efficiency, stability and precision to help maximize creative potential.

"Our new smaller form factor is a result of the input and requests from the creative community for a smaller version of our popular MX Keys," said Tolya Polyanker, head of MX Master Series for creativity and productivity at Logitech. "MX Keys Mini allows you to regain control of your workspace, giving you more room for ideas to flow while keeping you productive and comfortable for hours."
MX Keys Mini is equipped with Perfect Stroke, Logitech's best non-mechanical typing technology. The minimalist form factor aligns your shoulders and allows you to place your mouse closer to your keyboard for less hand reaching - resulting in better posture and improved ergonomics. Its spherically-dished keys place every key, command and shortcut at your fingertips, without cluttering your space with extra keys you don't need. Increased key stability reduces noise while optimizing responsiveness - and tactile reference for hand positioning makes it easy to orient your fingers and stay in your flow. Three new functions designed to optimize your work experience when using Logitech Options are available in MX Keys Mini: a dictation key (feature provided by Windows and macOS, available in select countries), mute/unmute microphone key and an emoji key.

Offering USB-C quick-charging, MX Keys Mini easily connects up to three wireless devices with Bluetooth Low Energy and is compatible with Windows, Chrome, Linux and Android, macOS, iOS, iPadOS, Bluetoothand Logi Bolt USB receiver. MX Keys Mini for Mac is optimized for macOS, iOS, and iPadOS.

MX Keys Mini appeals to every personality with three colors - rose, pale gray and graphite - and pairs well with Master Series mice, allowing you to build a complete MX setup and create like never before.

At Logitech, products are designed to deliver great user experiences and minimize environmental footprint. Sustainable design considers environmental and social impacts from the moment raw materials are sourced right through to end-of-life, which is why a portion of MX Keys Mini's plastic parts are made from post-consumer recycled (PCR) plastic — 30 percent for graphite and 12 percent for pale gray and rose. Logitech's PCR program illustrates the brand's commitment to designing for sustainability and ability to innovate to give materials a second life, helping reduce our industry's carbon impact. By the end of 2021, half of Logitech's current Personal Workspace line of mice and keyboards will include some level of PCR plastic and new product introductions will use PCR plastic, wherever possible. MX Keys Mini's paper packaging is also sourced from FSC(R)-certified forests, reflecting Logitech's commitment to supporting responsible management of the world's forests.

Pricing and Availability

Logitech MX Keys Mini and MX Keys Mini for Mac will be available starting today at Logitech.com and many global retailers. Suggested retail price for MX Keys Mini and MX Keys Mini for Mac is $99.99. MX Keys Mini for Business will be available for purchase in late October across key markets.
Source: Logitech
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16 Comments on Maximize Creative Potential with Logitech MX Keys Mini, a New Minimalist Wireless Keyboard

#1
Chrispy_
As a long-time owner of the full-size MX keyboard, they are disappointingly plastic feeling and the key feel is "casual use only" because they're cheapo membrane keys.

I wasn't expecting Cherry MX key switches but I bought it blindly expecting (at €100) for it to be made of high-quality aluminium.
It's cheap, flexible plastic crap with a metallic dye in the plastic to trick people into thinking it's alloy like the premium offering from other brands (notably Apple, Microsoft, and HP) and it's not worth half what Logitech are asking for it.
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#2
Valantar
Chrispy_As a long-time owner of the full-size MX keyboard, they are disappointingly plastic feeling and the key feel is "casual use only" because they're cheapo membrane keys.

I wasn't expecting Cherry MX key switches but I bought it blindly expecting (at €100) for it to be made of high-quality aluminium.
It's cheap, flexible plastic crap with a metallic dye in the plastic to trick people into thinking it's alloy like the premium offering from other brands (notably Apple, Microsoft, and HP) and it's not worth half what Logitech are asking for it.
That was my experience with their old "high end" slim Illuminated Keyboard K740 as well. Overall pretty meh. I guess I severely disadvantaged it by getting it around the same time as my ThinkPad X201, but man, those keys were mushy and terrible. That the platicizer in the palm rest rubber came out over the course of a couple of years didn't exactly help either. Replaced it with a Thinkpad Compact Trackpoint keyboard and never looked back.
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#3
ThaiTaffy
The minimalist form factor aligns your shoulders and allows you to place your mouse closer to your keyboard for less hand reaching - resulting in better posture and improved ergonomics.

:roll:
Posted on Reply
#4
Liquid Cool
100 bucks for this? o_O...

If I'm spending a c-note on a keyboard...it would have to be the quality of a Unicomp at a minimum. Something tells me...this wouldn't make the cut.

I'm a fan of Logitech, but the pricing on this doesn't seem realistic. At perhaps...48.95 it might be a nice addition to my RPI4 setup. I'm going to keep an eye on these and see if I can't nab one on sale...I'm a patient person.

Best,

Liquid Cool
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#6
Valantar
ThaiTaffyThe minimalist form factor aligns your shoulders and allows you to place your mouse closer to your keyboard for less hand reaching - resulting in better posture and improved ergonomics.

:roll:
I mean, they're not wrong - removing the numpad brings your mouse hand much closer and significantly reduces rotational stress on your elbow and lower arm (and possibly shoulder). But that's some very flowery language for making a very simple point :P
Posted on Reply
#7
ThaiTaffy
Exactly though when I was a kid they used to spout something similar and say you should use the mouse in your left hand.
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#8
Chrispy_
ValantarThat was my experience with their old "high end" slim Illuminated Keyboard K740 as well. Overall pretty meh. I guess I severely disadvantaged it by getting it around the same time as my ThinkPad X201, but man, those keys were mushy and terrible. That the platicizer in the palm rest rubber came out over the course of a couple of years didn't exactly help either. Replaced it with a Thinkpad Compact Trackpoint keyboard and never looked back.
To put it into context, The keyboard I was using prior to the Logitech Keys MX was a ~£18 ($25) Jelly Comb Amazon special. It was an alloy/plastic/alloy sandwich with scissor-style laptop chiclet keys and even though it was ultimately a membrane keyboard the key travel felt far nicer and more responsive than the disappointing Logitech mush. The fact that the chassis was higher quality and with less flex means that I would absolutely not pay more than about $40 for a Logitech MX Keys Mini - it's a $20 keyboard and you can add maybe $20 extra value because of Logitech's great warranty and RMA track record, but it's definitely not built like a quality product and you know that the instant you touch it for the first time.

I still have the Jelly Comb keyboard and the only reason I don't use it is that I needed a numberpad.
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#9
Valantar
Chrispy_To put it into context, The keyboard I was using prior to the Logitech Keys MX was a ~£18 ($25) Jelly Comb Amazon special. It was an alloy/plastic/alloy sandwich with scissor-style laptop chiclet keys and even though it was ultimately a membrane keyboard the key travel felt far nicer and more responsive than the disappointing Logitech mush. The fact that the chassis was higher quality and with less flex means that I would absolutely not pay more than about $40 for a Logitech MX Keys Mini - it's a $20 keyboard and you can add maybe $20 extra value because of Logitech's great warranty and RMA track record, but it's definitely not built like a quality product and you know that the instant you touch it for the first time.

I still have the Jelly Comb keyboard and the only reason I don't use it is that I needed a numberpad.
Yeah, good scissor switches with some solid backing can feel really great, but if you cheap out on either it goes downhill pretty fast. That Thinkpad compact keyboard I mentioned is just two layers of thin plastic framing surrounding the keyboard straight out of a T420 or similar plus a USB controller board - but the keyboard is extremely rigid by itself, and has a (steel? aluminium?) structural backplate that is glued down to the plastic. The bottom case also has a lot of complex ridges moulded into it for further rigidity. And of course the switches are excellent. The end result is a keyboard so good I'd say it competes with most mech keyboards in terms of response and key feel. I paid something like $60 for mine back in the day, but nowadays they sadly only sell an updated version with BT, which is more than 2x the price. I still kind of want one though :P
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#10
trsttte
You're paying a premium for the hipster minimalist design, not the for the quality.

All the Logitech MX products are pretty overpriced, the mouse is unmatched for productivity imo but you're still paying a big premium on it, the keyboards are for people who don't mind to pay only for the looks of it.
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#11
bigstu_
This is a downgrade and poor replacement for the K810.
Less Warranty - now 1 year instead of 3 years.
Bluetooth only - except if you BUY a Bolt receiver THAT IS NOT INCLUDED. WTF! Not Unifying compatible.
Battery doesn't last as long as K810 (judging by my personal MX Keys experience).
Key action not as nice - even though they are still calling it 'Perfect Stroke' something has definitely changed.
Materials nowhere near as nice.
So disappointed.
Logitech playing us for suckers at this point.
Posted on Reply
#12
TheLostSwede
bigstu_This is a downgrade and poor replacement for the K810.
Less Warranty - now 1 year instead of 3 years.
Bluetooth only - except if you BUY a Bolt receiver THAT IS NOT INCLUDED. WTF! Not Unifying compatible.
Battery doesn't last as long as K810 (judging by my personal MX Keys experience).
Key action not as nice - even though they are still calling it 'Perfect Stroke' something has definitely changed.
Materials nowhere near as nice.
So disappointed.
Logitech playing us for suckers at this point.
It seems like Logitech is dropping the Unifying receivers in favour of the more "secure" Bolt receivers. I'm sure someone will manage to hack those in due time.
Posted on Reply
#13
Valantar
bigstu_This is a downgrade and poor replacement for the K810.
Less Warranty - now 1 year instead of 3 years.
Bluetooth only - except if you BUY a Bolt receiver THAT IS NOT INCLUDED. WTF! Not Unifying compatible.
Battery doesn't last as long as K810 (judging by my personal MX Keys experience).
Key action not as nice - even though they are still calling it 'Perfect Stroke' something has definitely changed.
Materials nowhere near as nice.
So disappointed.
Logitech playing us for suckers at this point.
Ah, I had forgotten about the K810. That always tempted me, as trying it briefly it did feel very nice. This does indeed look like a downgrade. Though admittedly this is a tad cheaper - the K810 was $100 in 2012, which is ~$115 in 2021 dollars. Couple that with near-universal raw material cost increases over the past year (50-300% for many metals and some plastics) the price is somewhat understandable, though it's still too high IMO. They're definitely capitalizing on the window of acceptable hardware pricing expanding upwards significantly in the last few years, with "premium" products becoming ever more expensive. A $100 keyboard in 2021 was about as high as you got (outside of very small niches); a $100 keyboard in 2021 is still not cheap, but finding something 3x that price is pretty easy.
Posted on Reply
#16
Chrispy_
Logitech really aren't impressing me of late.

I wasted most of today installing 9 Rally 4K PTZ conference cameras. Downloading the right driver was far from obvious. I ended up getting a working one via a reddit post by other frustrated installers/sysadmins who'd found an unadvertised FTP server on Logitech.com because the conflicting ones linked from the product page, support pages, and the URL printed in the paper manual all failed to work.

Additionally, they all needed firmware updates, shipping with 1.0x firmware from over a year ago despite having a manufactured date less than 2 months ago and the dedicated Logitech Rally firmware update app failed to detect any of the cameras even whilst I was controlling the cameras with a Logitech Rally Control dedicated camera app.

To make matters worse, there's a face-tracking feature that only works on newer firmware, and also requires YET MORE software called Logitech Sync (there are two different products identically-named Logitech Sync, and one of them is totally unrelated to the Logitech Rally cameras). I downloaded the latest version of (the correct) Logitech Sync and then had to update the app again from within the app itself before I could use it. Over the course of the day, the update servers went down twice, once for 15 minutes, and once again for almost 3 hours. I thought it was some niche SSL inspection problem on our firewall, but it randomly started connecting again before I'd committed changes to the firewall, so it was 100% Logitech's servers being unreachable for these periods. That is irresponsibly unacceptable for a company as big as Logitech, IMO.

Once it was all done, the cameras are decent quality and the software can pretty much be hidden away and forgotten about never to be used again, but this is my general experience with Logitech drivers/website these days. I have a whole bunch of Logitech stuff at home and I've learned to use them without drivers whenever possible and UNDER NO CIRCUMSTANCES use the Logitech website for answers.

It feels like Logitech have just stopped trying. The prices are doubling and the effort/quality is dropping rapidly...
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