Tuesday, October 26th 2021

AGON by AOC Unveils Three New High Refresh-rate Gaming Monitors with Mini-LED IPS Panels

One of the world's leading gaming monitor and IT accessories brands, AGON by AOC, expands its AGON PRO line-up aimed at competitive players and introduces a legendary trio of monitors: the 68.6 cm (27") AG274QXM (QHD @ 170 Hz), which employs a Mini LED IPS panel with VESA DisplayHDR 1000 certification, the 27" AG274UXP (4K @ 144 Hz) and the 27" AG274QG (QHD @ 240 Hz), both 4-side frameless monitors equipped with fast IPS panels and VESA DisplayHDR 600 support.

Legends of the gaming community have been waiting for this ultimate moment: the two factions of the universe join together for the better cause. Gaming at the competitive level requires high refresh rates and extremely responsive displays. On the other hand, story-driven, slower-paced games with beautiful visuals are best enjoyed when enhanced by wide gamut HDR displays. AGON PRO delivers a combination of all in a prestigious package: high-speed, responsive panels (up to 240 Hz and 1 ms GtG), high resolution (QHD or 4K) and true VESA certified HDR support (DisplayHDR 600 or DisplayHDR 1000).
The 27" AG274QXM employs an award-winning design (Red Dot Design Award) and comes with a monitor shield (Shadow Shield) to reduce reflections from sunlight or bright stage lights. The exceptional Mini LED backlight technology and a fast IPS panel with a QHD resolution (2560 x 1440) offers 576 dimming zones for DisplayHDR 1000 support to achieve a minimised halo effect and better brightness uniformity compared to edge-lit HDR displays, while reducing the monitor's thickness. The high-tier VESA certified DisplayHDR 1000 ensures a peak brightness of 1000 nits and deep, inky black levels, all within the same frame. Capable of 1.07 billion colours and with a DCI-P3 gamut area of 99%2, the AG274QXM offers a superb colour experience. Gamers from all levels, particularly competitive gamers, will appreciate the monitor's 170 Hz refresh rate with 1 ms GtG for silky-smooth visuals. With its G-SYNC compatibility, the monitor offers stutter- and tearing-free gameplay even with HDR turned on.

The 27" AG274UXP is equipped with a Nano IPS panel with 4K resolution (3840 x 2160) to deliver extremely sharp images with its 163 PPI pixel density. By combining a 4K resolution with a 144 Hz refresh rate and 1 ms GtG response time, the monitor fully delivers on the competitive front. The colour-accurate monitor offers VESA DisplayHDR 600 for rich, bright and dynamic visuals by featuring a very high brightness, 1.07 billion colours and covering 98% of the DCI-P3 gamut area. The monitor has a 4-side frameless design for the extra sleek look, which received the Red Dot Design Award, and it also comes with a Shadow Shield. Thanks to its HDMI 2.1 support, the AG274UXP is fully compatible with the new-gen consoles, which can output 4K @ 120 Hz and can support variable refresh rate. Tearing and stuttering both on consoles and PC is eliminated as it is G-SYNC compatible.

For most hardcore gamers and esports players who need the highest frames per second they can get, but still don't want to compromise on colour fidelity, the G-SYNC ULTIMATE monitor AG274QG is just perfect. The 27" AG274QG features a fast IPS panel with QHD resolution (2560 x 1440) and a refresh rate of up to 240 Hz to deliver both incredibly detailed and butter-smooth gameplay. With a response time of 1 ms GtG, ghosting is virtually non-existent, and latency-aficionados can even measure their system latency thanks to the built-in NVIDIA Reflex Analyzer. By connecting a Reflex-supported mouse such as AOC's GM500, the analyser can give users instant feedback on the system latency. Rich, vivid images are also one of the AG274QG's strengths. With 1.07 billion colours, a 98% coverage of the DCI-P3 area, the AG274QG is also VESA DisplayHDR 600 certified and displays eye-watering bright sunlight and scary deep shadows at the same time. The NVIDIA G-SYNC ULTIMATE certification means that the monitor employs a top-notch NVIDIA G-SYNC processor to guarantee lifelike HDR, excellent contrast and ultra-low latency for a spectacular, immersive gaming experience. The monitor also features the same award-winning design and the Shadow Shield.

All three monitors are equipped with a 120 mm height-adjustable and versatile stand for comfortable gaming sessions. A 4-port USB 3.2 hub is built in, to help gamers connect their peripherals such as keyboards, mice, streaming lights or webcams.

The monitors feature the RGB illumination (Light FX) and AGON logo projection introduced in previous AGON PRO models to increase personalisation. The QuickSwitch controller, a wired remote, is featured with all models to easily adjust game-specific features in the OSD. The OSD can also be controlled on the monitor itself or using the G-Menu software (AG274QXM and AG274UXP).

To complete the audio-visual experience, all models have two 5 W speakers supporting DTS for clear and rich sound. The AG274QXM and AG274UXP feature USB-C connection (65 W power delivery) and a built-in KVM switch. For content creators and live streamers who use multiple computers, this feature makes it easy to switch between two PCs while using the same monitor and peripherals, or to mirror their smartphones via USB-C when streaming mobile games. The AG274UXP also offers a Picture-by-Picture mode.
  • The AGON PRO AG274QXM will be available from October 2021 at the RRP of £849.99.
  • The AGON PRO AG274UXP will be available from February 2022 at the RRP of £769.99.
  • The AGON PRO AG274QG will be available from February 2022 - price tbc.
For more information, visit the product pages of the AG274QXM, AG274UXP, and AG274QG.
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15 Comments on AGON by AOC Unveils Three New High Refresh-rate Gaming Monitors with Mini-LED IPS Panels

#1
Asni
To be honest, i don't understand why they chose to implement miniled backlight on the 1440p model while the 4k144hz, which is already expensive, adopts classical and cheaper 16 zones local dimming.
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#2
Valantar
Hmmm.... are companies suddenly putting out MSRPs in pounds in order to make their products look less expensive? £850 is nearly $1200; £770 is more than $1050. If that's including the 20% UK VAT we're looking at $978 (so $1000) and $880, which looks better at least, but it's still not cheap.

I was also really hoping the UHD panel had microLEDs, though it'll nonetheless be interesting to see how that QHD miniLED panel fares. It might be one of the (very) few real HDR PC gaming displays on the market, which is nothing to scoff at.
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#3
TheLostSwede
ValantarHmmm.... are companies suddenly putting out MSRPs in pounds in order to make their products look less expensive? £850 is nearly $1200; £770 is more than $1050. If that's including the 20% UK VAT we're looking at $978 (so $1000) and $880, which looks better at least, but it's still not cheap.

I was also really hoping the UHD panel had microLEDs, though it'll nonetheless be interesting to see how that QHD miniLED panel fares. It might be one of the (very) few real HDR PC gaming displays on the market, which is nothing to scoff at.
Well, that does include UK VAT, so it might work to compare to Swedish prices, but not US prices.
Also, it seems like Philips and AOC (same company behind them when it comes to displays) like to use sterling as the currency in press releases for some reason.
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#4
Valantar
TheLostSwedeWell, that does include UK VAT, so it might work to compare to Swedish prices, but not US prices.
Also, it seems like Philips and AOC (same company behind them when it comes to displays) like to use sterling as the currency in press releases for some reason.
Weird, but I guess there's some reason for it somewhere. It just throws off my mental MSRP arithmetic (roughly MSRP in USD*1.1-1.2=prices in NOK/SEK). I guess the ideal would be EU MSRPs with VAT included, but given that VATs vary between EU countries (at least to some degree) I guess that's also rather utopian. Someone should make a browser extension for MSRP conversion estimates :P
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#5
TheLostSwede
ValantarWeird, but I guess there's some reason for it somewhere. It just throws off my mental MSRP arithmetic (roughly MSRP in USD*1.1-1.2=prices in NOK/SEK). I guess the ideal would be EU MSRPs with VAT included, but given that VATs vary between EU countries (at least to some degree) I guess that's also rather utopian. Someone should make a browser extension for MSRP conversion estimates :p
A long, long time ago, it used to be that prices for computer stuff was US$1 = UK£1 +/- 10%. Not so much any more.
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#6
Valantar
TheLostSwedeA long, long time ago, it used to be that prices for computer stuff was US$1 = UK£1 +/- 10%. Not so much any more.
Yep, and it used to be that I could add a zero to USD prices and have the NOK retail price too (or that estimate might even be a tad high!). But that was back when the USD was 6-7NOK, not >8 like today, or ~10 as it was a year or two back.
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#7
noel_fs
AsniTo be honest, i don't understand why they chose to implement miniled backlight on the 1440p model while the 4k144hz, which is already expensive, adopts classical and cheaper 16 zones local dimming.
thats why i went with samsung qn90a, gaming brands are abusing the "gaming" trend, subpar prodcuts everywhere with top notch price points. Just unacceptable, maybe things would change if people stopped buying the first product that says its gaming
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#8
Tigger
I'm the only one
Nice but yikes they're expensive
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#9
trsttte
AsniTo be honest, i don't understand why they chose to implement miniled backlight on the 1440p model while the 4k144hz, which is already expensive, adopts classical and cheaper 16 zones local dimming.
It's really confusing, but at least the line-up signals that mini-led monitors at more reasonable prices are on the way (still expensive but like "high end new tech" expensive, not "fuck you poor people" expensive)
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#10
Gmr_Chick
Gawd these AGON press releases are straight up cringe-fuel.... :fear:
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#11
InVasMani
It's a shame QLED displays only come in 32" and up sizes.
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#12
Minus Infinity
See no point in 4K on a 27" gaming monitor. I challenge you to see the difference compared to 1440p ultra settings. I know you sit a lot closer to a monitor than TV, but still 4K makes a lot more sense on a 32"+ monitor IMO.
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#13
Xajel
Good, mini-LED started to came into PC monitors.. Hope to see some Ultrawide love soon, a 3840x1600 @38" with 144>160 Hz @ HDR600/1000 will be very good if it was priced correctly, but I know... Ultrawide are more expensive than 4K for some reason (maybe mass market thing?) and mini-LED will have some premium for early adopters.
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#14
Valantar
XajelGood, mini-LED started to came into PC monitors.. Hope to see some Ultrawide love soon, a 3840x1600 @38" with 144>160 Hz @ HDR600/1000 will be very good if it was priced correctly, but I know... Ultrawide are more expensive than 4K for some reason (maybe mass market thing?) and mini-LED will have some premium for early adopters.
Ultrawides are more expensive than 4k because panel size more of a determinant of cost than pixel density, and Ultrawides stack less optimally into the sheet sizes that LCDs are produced in, meaning fewer panels per sheet, or lower yields. Plus, ultrawides are more niche, and thus benefit less from economies of scale.
InVasManiIt's a shame QLED displays only come in 32" and up sizes.
Isn't NANO IPS and QLED more or less the same just from different companies? Both are nanoparticle/quantum dot color gamut enhancement technologies, no? One might be VA and the other IPS, but that's unrelated to the QLED/NANO part.
noel_fsthats why i went with samsung qn90a, gaming brands are abusing the "gaming" trend, subpar prodcuts everywhere with top notch price points. Just unacceptable, maybe things would change if people stopped buying the first product that says its gaming
I'm always fascinated by people who seem to not include any context in their thinking. TVs outsell monitors by a massive margin - I wouldn't be surprised if it was more than 100:1, and that would include low end office monitors, POS monitors, etc. The economies of scale here are in no way comparable. Then there are the features - TV makers serve ads and are paid for including various streaming services and the like on their products, which a monitor won't have. The lower sales volumes of monitors also mean higher R&D costs per panel, which is especially noticeable when you add advanced features that TVs lack like variable overdrive modes. Gaming monitors are still overpriced, absolutely, but not as badly as an assumed 1:1 comparison to a TV might make it seem.
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#15
Chomiq
InVasManiIt's a shame QLED displays only come in 32" and up sizes.
Umm if those AOC panels cover 98%+ of DCI-P3 then they most definitely have quantum dots to expand the gamut.
noel_fsthats why i went with samsung qn90a, gaming brands are abusing the "gaming" trend, subpar prodcuts everywhere with top notch price points. Just unacceptable, maybe things would change if people stopped buying the first product that says its gaming
You must have missed the part about Samsung delivering subpar IPS model of QN90A in Europe instead of VA panel used for the same model name in the US. In Europe VA panel is used in QN91A.
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