Tuesday, November 23rd 2021

Samsung Electronics Announces New Advanced Semiconductor Fab Site in Taylor, Texas

Samsung Electronics, a world leader in advanced semiconductor technology, today announced that it would build a new semiconductor manufacturing facility in Taylor, Texas. The estimated $17 billion investment in the United States will help boost production of advanced logic semiconductor solutions that power next-generation innovations and technologies.

The new facility will manufacture products based on advanced process technologies for application in areas such as mobile, 5G, high-performance computing (HPC) and artificial intelligence (AI). Samsung remains committed to supporting customers globally by making advanced semiconductor fabrication more accessible and meeting surging demand for leading-edge products.
"As we add a new facility in Taylor, Samsung is laying the groundwork for another important chapter in our future," said Kinam Kim, Vice Chairman and CEO, Samsung Electronics Device Solutions Division. "With greater manufacturing capacity, we will be able to better serve the needs of our customers and contribute to the stability of the global semiconductor supply chain."

"We are also proud to be bringing more jobs and supporting the training and talent development for local communities, as Samsung celebrates 25 years of semiconductor manufacturing in the U.S.," Kim said.

"In addition to our partners in Texas, we are grateful to the Biden Administration for creating an environment that supports companies like Samsung as we work to expand leading-edge semiconductor manufacturing in the U.S.," continued Kim. "We also thank the administration and Congress for their bipartisan support to swiftly enact federal incentives for domestic chip production and innovation."

Groundbreaking will be in the first half of 2022 with the target of having the facility operational in the second half of 2024. The Taylor site will span more than 5 million square meters and is expected to serve as a key location for Samsung's global semiconductor manufacturing capacity along with its latest new production line in Pyeongtaek, South Korea.

The total expected investment of $17 billion, including buildings, property improvements, machinery and equipment, will mark the largest-ever investment made by Samsung in the U.S. This will also bring Samsung's total investment in the U.S. to more than $47 billion since beginning operations in the country in 1978, where the company now has over 20,000 employees across the country.

"Companies like Samsung continue to invest in Texas because of our world-class business climate and exceptional workforce," said Governor Abbott. "Samsung's new semiconductor manufacturing facility in Taylor will bring countless opportunities for hardworking Central Texans and their families and will play a major role in our state's continued exceptionalism in the semiconductor industry. I look forward to expanding our partnership to keep the Lone Star State a leader in advanced technology and a dynamic economic powerhouse."

After reviewing multiple locations within the U.S. for a potential manufacturing site, the decision to invest in Taylor was based on multiple factors, including the local semiconductor ecosystem, infrastructure stability, local government support and community development opportunities. In particular, the proximity to Samsung's current manufacturing site in Austin, about 25 kilometers southwest of Taylor, allows the two locations to share the necessary infrastructure and resources.

This latest expansion of Samsung's U.S. presence is expected to create over 2,000 high-tech jobs directly and thousands of related jobs once the new facility is in full operation. As part of its co-investment in the community, Samsung will also contribute financial support to create a Samsung Skills Center for the Taylor Independent School District (ISD) to help students develop skills for future careers as well as providing internships and recruiting opportunities.
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23 Comments on Samsung Electronics Announces New Advanced Semiconductor Fab Site in Taylor, Texas

#1
Chomiq
Mr Kim looks like a CGI render.
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#2
DeathtoGnomes
Its not like they had muych of a choice if they still want to be relevant in the USA and not be under scrutiny by NSA, errm, I mean security officers.
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#3
lynx29
Another silicon production facility in the drought ridden southern states, neat. That's going to pan out well in 10 years, but hey, what do I know. I guess if its get too bad they know my tax payer money will fund giant pipes from the 5 great lakes down to them, they already do that for NYC, and talked about it for California on more than one occasion. God forbid we create a symbiosis with our environment and be strategic where we place things, but why do that when you can hit nature with a sledgehammer over and over.

That's ok though, mother nature will get the last laugh, hehehe
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#4
Bomby569
now let's hope they can manage their electricity grid
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#5
lZKoce
Choice of location ain't a surprise with so many others leaving California....I ain't livin there, but it seems taxes and housing issues are driving a lot of talent and business out of the state.
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#6
lynx29
lZKoceChoice of location ain't a surprise with so many others leaving California....I ain't livin there, but it seems taxes and housing issues are driving a lot of talent and business out of the state.
yeah, and there are 49 other states to choose from, 20 of which that have lower taxes than even Texas does. in fact a couple Republican states in the midwest, not only give full tax breaks to new businesses building factories there, they incentivize it with extra whipped cream on top and those states have no future water issues. my guess is, yacht club memberships are involved, hehehe glory be to capitalism indeed! ah what madness is this age I live in? I wonder if the Cosmos will ever show itself in the realms of man?
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#7
Bomby569
lynx29yeah, and there are 49 other states to choose from, 20 of which that have lower taxes than even Texas does. in fact a couple Republican states in the midwest, not only give full tax breaks to new businesses building factories there, they incentivize it with extra whipped cream on top and those states have no future water issues. my guess is, yacht club memberships are involved, hehehe glory be to capitalism indeed! ah what madness is this age I live in? I wonder if the Cosmos will ever show itself in the realms of man?
wasn't California more about the culture, good weather, and abundance of skilled workers then taxes?
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#8
lynx29
Bomby569wasn't California more about the culture, good weather, and abundance of skilled workers then taxes?
yeah, people hate winter. skilled workers is debatable. most workers you are referring to are eligible for remote working positions, however, most companies are not willing to innovate and advocate for that, I have no idea why, as not having any real estate would be major addition to profit margins. I guess the free markets don't like profit after all. who knows anymore. world has gone mad as far as I am concerned.
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#9
mouacyk
Another Fox-con deal. Didn't pan out well here in WI.
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#10
AnarchoPrimitiv
lynx29Another silicon production facility in the drought ridden southern states, neat. That's going to pan out well in 10 years, but hey, what do I know. I guess if its get too bad they know my tax payer money will fund giant pipes from the 5 great lakes down to them, they already do that for NYC, and talked about it for California on more than one occasion. God forbid we create a symbiosis with our environment and be strategic where we place things, but why do that when you can hit nature with a sledgehammer over and over.

That's ok though, mother nature will get the last laugh, hehehe
I totally agree with you, and more, but from my own experience on here, you might want to be careful voicing those opinions because you might get in trouble.
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#11
lynx29
AnarchoPrimitivI totally agree with you, and more, but from my own experience on here, you might want to be careful voicing those opinions because you might get in trouble.
If speaking basic logic and reason gets me in trouble, then so be it, that's a world I no longer want to live in. Long live the ancient Philosopher's!
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#12
silentbogo
Bomby569now let's hope they can manage their electricity grid
Looks like TX was strategically picked just for that ))) Now it'll be more convenient to blame IC price hikes on power outages and contaminated water.
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#13
Steevo
lynx29Another silicon production facility in the drought ridden southern states, neat. That's going to pan out well in 10 years, but hey, what do I know. I guess if its get too bad they know my tax payer money will fund giant pipes from the 5 great lakes down to them, they already do that for NYC, and talked about it for California on more than one occasion. God forbid we create a symbiosis with our environment and be strategic where we place things, but why do that when you can hit nature with a sledgehammer over and over.

That's ok though, mother nature will get the last laugh, hehehe
I see it as a positive since they are bound by our EPA laws even though government overreach is wildly out of control.
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#14
Bomby569
silentbogoLooks like TX was strategically picked just for that ))) Now it'll be more convenient to blame IC price hikes on power outages and contaminated water.
i really don't know about the Texas water, but it's really strange they pick Texas that has a disaster of an electric grid for what i've read (and not only because of the last "ice age") and i also read that disruptions in power are really bad for this type of fabs
Probably subsidies but that's just my guess
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#15
Basard
lynx29Another silicon production facility in the drought ridden southern states, neat. That's going to pan out well in 10 years, but hey, what do I know. I guess if its get too bad they know my tax payer money will fund giant pipes from the 5 great lakes down to them, they already do that for NYC, and talked about it for California on more than one occasion. God forbid we create a symbiosis with our environment and be strategic where we place things, but why do that when you can hit nature with a sledgehammer over and over.

That's ok though, mother nature will get the last laugh, hehehe
Well, it's not like they need trees to make micro chips..... them fuckers are rich enough to where they can just build a desalinization plant if they need fresh water for anything.
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#16
AlwaysHope
Bomby569now let's hope they can manage their electricity grid
Samsung already has interests in nuclear power generation globally, I mean they have the know how to build their very own nuclear reactor to solve that problem.
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#17
timta2
No mention of how much taxpayers are going to be on the hook for? A certain group loves to give taxpayer money to corporations, as long as they can benefit from it.
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#18
watzupken
Bomby569i really don't know about the Texas water, but it's really strange they pick Texas that has a disaster of an electric grid for what i've read (and not only because of the last "ice age") and i also read that disruptions in power are really bad for this type of fabs
Probably subsidies but that's just my guess
I agree. It is as if last year's outage was not a good reason to avoid Texas. Yet they are doubling down by opening a massive fab in the same location.
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#19
Why_Me
lynx29Another silicon production facility in the drought ridden southern states, neat. That's going to pan out well in 10 years, but hey, what do I know. I guess if its get too bad they know my tax payer money will fund giant pipes from the 5 great lakes down to them, they already do that for NYC, and talked about it for California on more than one occasion. God forbid we create a symbiosis with our environment and be strategic where we place things, but why do that when you can hit nature with a sledgehammer over and over.

That's ok though, mother nature will get the last laugh, hehehe
You ever ask yourself why businesses are moving to business friendly states ... which most all happen to be located in the southern portion of the US.
Bomby569wasn't California more about the culture, good weather, and abundance of skilled workers then taxes?
California has numerous power outages, super high taxes not to mention Californians are now drinking recycled toilet water. If any US state lacks water its California.

www.sfgate.com/bayarea/article/Recycled-water-from-sewer-OK-d-for-California-12735732.php
silentbogoLooks like TX was strategically picked just for that ))) Now it'll be more convenient to blame IC price hikes on power outages and contaminated water.
I plan on retiring in western Ukraine ... here's to hoping the water is clean.
lynx29yeah, and there are 49 other states to choose from, 20 of which that have lower taxes than even Texas does. in fact a couple Republican states in the midwest, not only give full tax breaks to new businesses building factories there, they incentivize it with extra whipped cream on top and those states have no future water issues. my guess is, yacht club memberships are involved, hehehe glory be to capitalism indeed! ah what madness is this age I live in? I wonder if the Cosmos will ever show itself in the realms of man?
If the likes of Tesla and Samsung relocated to say Ohio for example how long before they would be dealing with the union bs?
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#20
lynx29
Why_MeIf the likes of Tesla and Samsung relocated to say Ohio for example how long before they would be dealing with the union bs?
Indiana touches one of the Great Lakes. It is more Republican percentage wise than Texas, and public record of historical voting proves it.
BasardWell, it's not like they need trees to make micro chips..... them fuckers are rich enough to where they can just build a desalinization plant if they need fresh water for anything.
Doubtful, desalinization plants are historically subsidized by government tax payer money.
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#21
NotHereMan
Does this mean even more outsiders are moving to Texas? A single person with a salary of $40K/year no longer makes living in safe communities affordable. Gotta pack some heat when going to or leaving your residence.

They were afraid of another outage in the summer, but shortly after they stated that energy conservation was "highly recommended". You should see Las, Colinas in Irving. There's a neighborhood of 4-story apartment complexes. Must be at least 12 communities within walking distance. Oh, and they're building more in that one area. Maybe normal to some, but I like the idea of vacant real estate.

Hell, what am I saying? I'm probably going to apply at this fab. The only thing we can do is blend in.
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#22
Anvirol
Looking forward to future news of repeated Texas power grid failures due to slightly below 0 temperatures and loss of silicon production, which will drive consumer prices up.
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#23
simlife
wow they picked a state whos senator field during the freease of the century to a 320 a day hotel... lied about it then came back after the lie was exposed..( on tape) who attack dump before he was eleceted then praised after elclete but hated before... because policitcs who called out his entire family
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