Friday, December 3rd 2021

Windows 11 a Flop, Survey Claims Less Than 1% Upgraded, Microsoft Improves Start Menu

Microsoft Windows 11, now nearing its third month since release, is for all intents and purposes, a flop. Market research by Lansweeper, which surveyed over 10 million PCs across the commercial and personal market segments, reports that less than 0.21% of the users it surveyed, had upgraded from Windows 10 to the newer operating system. The upgrade is free of charge. There may be several factors contributing to this lukewarm market response, but one of them is certain to he the steep hardware requirements. Windows 11 requires a trusted platform module (TPM 2.0), which disqualifies PCs older than 2018 for upgrades, unless the user is willing to try out workarounds to the limitation. Another factor could be the clunky user interface (UI), a less functional Start menu than Windows 10, and several UI-related bugs.

According to Lansweeper's data, there could be more people running outdated Windows XP, Vista, Windows 8, etc., than Windows 11, and this poses a great security risk, as these operating systems are no longer supported by Microsoft for regular security updates. Windows 10, on the other hand, is eligible for them until mid-2025—plenty of time for people to upgrade hardware to meet Windows 11 system requirements, or to simply make up their mind on switching over to the new operating system. In related news, Microsoft could give the Windows 11 Start menu a functional update. Test build 22509 introduces the ability to add more pins to the menu, or make room for more recommendations. The UI could see many such minor updates.
Sources: Tech Radar PRO, HotHardware
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282 Comments on Windows 11 a Flop, Survey Claims Less Than 1% Upgraded, Microsoft Improves Start Menu

#1
Caring1
I like having the control panel still, but Microsoft is intent on removing it with W11.
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#2
HD64G
Since most of the CPU owners able to upgrade have Zen arch CPUs and MS messed the CPU scheduler for those CPUs, it fairly backfired heavily.
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#3
wheresmycar
If it ain't broken, don't fix it.... I love the traditional UI functionality. Makes no sense to swap things around. I haven't even looked into the technical/compatibility aspects yet. The UI was enough to keep me on Win 10.

They should of kept the top layer the same (esp. Start menu and task bar). Too many changes in an already life-long (so it seems) functional work environment is more of a discouragement IMO.

Anyway the rest is down to reviewer feedback. Im a late jumper. Much like battlefield 2042....wait a little longer for a more polished up package and u might just get your moneys worth from the get go (no win 11 isn't free, its costing that sacred start menu and task bar familiarity - who knows what else?)
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#4
Selaya
The tradition of the bust release inbetween good ones continues. Given the past track record, this doesn't surprise me at all.
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#5
Frank_100
Microsoft desktop should be a standard like KDE or Gnome.

I don't believe they understand the damage they do to their brand.
HD64GSince most of the CPU owners able to upgrade have Zen arch CPUs and MS messed the CPU scheduler for those CPUs, it fairly backfired heavily.
I have a 5950 X machine for music production(fun) and a 7900X machine for numerical math(work).

Neither machine meets the windows 11 specks.
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#6
LabRat 891
Windows 11 is basically Windows 10.1, ala Win8-8.1.
I don't recall either 8 or 8.1 being well liked or popular.
When I worked retail tech in the 8-8.1 era, almost every new PC customer wanted Windows 7; some even paid us to 'downgrade' their purchase to Windows 7.
It really doesn't surprise me that 11 is a non-starter.
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#7
HD64G
Frank_100Microsoft desktop should be a standard like KDE or Gnome.

I don't believe they understand the damage they do to their brand.


I have a 5950 X machine for music production(fun) and a 7900X machine for numerical math(work).

Neither machine meets the windows 11 specks.
Almost surely the 5950X system is upgradeable just with a UEFI change in the security options to enable TPM version 2.0 and secure boot.
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#9
The Quim Reaper
Change for the sake of change.

No doubt I'll end up on 11 at some point (next complete new PC build in 2023/24) but it will be done on my timescale, not Microsoft's.

Unless of course 11 is considered to be such a flop that they move quickly to Windows 12 :D
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#10
Vayra86
Burn it with fire. Show Nadella how this game works. Do it right or f off.

And he can take his Store along with 11 to the dust bin too.
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#11
Zubasa
HD64GAlmost surely the 5950X system is upgradeable just with a UEFI change in the security options to enable TPM version 2.0 and secure boot.
For DIY PCs you don't even need to enable Secure Boot, just fTPM.
In fact new bios updates for most boards just enable fTPM by default so that people stop getting confused by Microsoft.
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#12
R0H1T
I'm like 0.000001% of that less than 1% so I'm sure it's not a total flop :pimp:
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#13
AugeK
With Windows 11 I use the same UI as I did with Windows 10: Classic Shell add-on as, in my personal opinion, both UI suck.
But Windows 11 UI to me is an absolute no-go, no way I'm ever gonna use it!
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#14
Karti
Lets see..
- more force on using a online account, you are literaly blocked from many things if you bypass their requirments and make a offline acc
- more resource intensive on lower tier hardware - even if it all fits the requirments and you are "inside cpu generation list" that they gave us some time ago
- more telemetry and sucking of our data
- making things that worked flawlessly for more than +20 years - more hard and idiotic... just don't let me start talking about "right click" and seeing you are lacking so many options... UNLESS you press then a button there to extend that crapy right click, with a second right click menu.. THAT IS ACTUALY WHAT WE HAD ALL THAT TIME - like... microsoft (duck) why you had to force on reinventing the wheel, and giving us a triangle?

Srsly windows 11 is the final thing that proves that you rather stay with windows 10... or give a shot to a linux
maybe it will be a total flop that will get a total rework of how it suppose to work.. just like xbox one was at start - remember whole "tv" jokes we had from start? - it gonna get fixed in a future? who knows... but for now i am staying with my dual drive with Windows 10 and Linux Mint... bb win 11 - for now
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#15
AusWolf
Of course it's a flop!

No one has ever asked for it, yet they still made TPM 2.0 a requirement. It's like a vegetarian driving into a McDonalds drive-thru only to be told that he/she has to drive a car that was made in the last 2 years to enter.

As for me, I don't need another crappy Start menu to fix the current crappy one. Just bring back any Start menu from between Windows 95 and Windows 7, and I'll be happy, thank you very much.

Why Microsoft thinks that people enjoy re-learning stuff that has worked for ages is beyond me. Especially since they've already sat in the same pickle with Windows 8.
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#17
R0H1T
AusWolfNo one has ever asked for it, yet they still made TPM 2.0 a requirement.
It's not a requirement.
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#18
chrcoluk
Why are they calling it a start menu? its a tablet style app drawer in a window, I simply cannot get my head around the amount of padding they have in place for it. The padding is as big as the icons are, so much wasted space.

It kind of reminds me of the Edge situation, Microsoft made a thread on their own community forum asking for feedback, overwhelmingly people asked for the padding to be reduced and they simply stopped replying ignoring the feedback.

They tried this focusing on tablets for the UI in Windows Eight which made it a failure but somehow people are not reacting the same on Windows even for some reason.

Thinking of the history of windows?

7 - drop widgets, 11- add widgets
10 - add app pinning animated tiles, 11 drop it again
8 - remove start menu, 10 add start menu, 11 - drop start menu
10 - decrease padding on taskbar, 11 increase it significantly
8 - remove file version in explorer in favour of file history feature, 10 add it back.

Chopping and changing, but not just chopping and changing also reversing previous decisions.

11 I feel I want to say is the worst windows UI, but 8 probably still holds the crown, however its a strong second.

I dont think its a flop though, on many communities I am on nearly everyone is choosing to upgrade. I only know of one person who downgraded back to 10, everyone else just seems to soak up the UI changes as if they dont care.

www.microsoft.com/en-us/windows/windows-11-specifications#table3

Check Feature Deprecations, all the UI stuff.
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#19
AusWolf
R0H1TIt's not a requirement.
"Windows 11 requires a trusted platform module (TPM 2.0), which disqualifies PCs older than 2018 for upgrades, unless the user is willing to try out workarounds to the limitation."

How many people do you think are willing to try workarounds just to get Windows 11 (that they don't need anyway)?
chrcolukWhy are they calling it a start menu? its a tablet style app drawer in a window, I simply cannot get my head around the amount of padding they have in place for it. The padding is as big as the cons are, so much wasted space.

It kind of reminds me of the Edge situation, Microsoft made a thread on their own community forum asking for feedback, overwhelmingly people asked for the padding to be reduced and they simply stopped replying ignoring the feedback.

They tried this focusing on tables for the UI in Windows Eight which made it a failure but somehow people are not reacting the same on Windows even for some reason.
That just gave me a revolutionary idea! Why don't they put only one icon in the middle of the screen, with 98% of the screen serving no purpose? Then the user could scroll endlessly to get to the next icon. :laugh:
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#20
Vya Domus
Well, probably less than 1% of all PCs out there even support it so it's not exactly surprising.
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#21
chrcoluk
AusWolf"Windows 11 requires a trusted platform module (TPM 2.0), which disqualifies PCs older than 2018 for upgrades, unless the user is willing to try out workarounds to the limitation."

How many people do you think are willing to try workarounds just to get Windows 11 (that they don't need anyway)?


That just gave me a revolutionary idea! Why don't they put only one icon in the middle of the screen, with 98% of the screen serving no purpose? Then the user could scroll endlessly to get to the next icon. :laugh:
It seems to be a modern dev thing with excessive padding, firefox dev's tried to remove their "compact" option as well, but after a massive backlash they hidden it instead crying they wont support it lol.
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#22
AusWolf
chrcolukIt seems to be a modern dev thing with excessive padding
I don't understand why, though. Do they think people don't use mice anymore? :kookoo:
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#23
R0H1T
AusWolf"Windows 11 requires a trusted platform module (TPM 2.0), which disqualifies PCs older than 2018 for upgrades, unless the user is willing to try out workarounds to the limitation."
Right & like I said you don't need it.
AusWolfHow many people do you think are willing to try workarounds just to get Windows 11 (that they don't need anyway)?
That wasn't the point.
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#24
bug
I called from the start: extra restrictions, little to nothing to show for it. I even said "free" is too expensive for what they offer, they should be paying us to install that.
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#25
Chomiq
AusWolfI don't understand why, though. Do they think people don't use mice anymore? :kookoo:
Simple:
microsoft.fandom.com/wiki/Windows_10X

11 is a rebranded 10X. This is what you get when port interface designed for tablets to use for desktop environment.
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