Monday, December 6th 2021

AMD 4800S Desktop Kit Launching 2022 Supporting Radeon RX 6600

The AMD 4800S desktop kit appears to be a successor to the 4700S which featured a repurposed Ariel SoC from the PlayStation 5 with the integrated RDNA2 graphics disabled. The 4700S Mini-ITX kit featured a single PCIe x4 Gen 2.0 slot which limited compatibility to lower-end graphics cards and restricted the availability of high-speed storage or connectivity. The upcoming 4800S Micro-ATX kit appears to remedy these issues by upgrading to a different Zen 2 chip possibly the one used by Microsoft in the Xbox Series X/S consoles with a PCIe Gen 4.0 link. The desktop system will support AM4 coolers and includes an M.2 slot for SSD storage or WiFi connectivity. AMD is planning to release the 4800S desktop kit in Q1 2022 with the board being manufactured by MSI and bundled with a TUL (PowerColor) Radeon RX 6600 graphics card.
Source: Discoluzen (via VideoCardz)
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37 Comments on AMD 4800S Desktop Kit Launching 2022 Supporting Radeon RX 6600

#1
Lionheart
I want one of these for the right price (rolls eyes), can someone enlighten me, where are the DIMM/SODIMM slots?
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#2
Jism
The revision offers PCI-E 4.0 and is no longer a bottleneck compared to the previous gen, that was capped at PCI-E 3.0 X2 or X4.
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#3
Uskompuf
LionheartI want one of these for the right price (rolls eyes), can someone enlighten me, where are the DIMM/SODIMM slots?
The memory is included in the processor package, with the 4700S 8 GB and 16 GB varients were available.
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#4
AsRock
TPU addict
manufactured by MSI and bundled with a TUL (PowerColor) Radeon RX 6600 graphics card.
Like a stab in the face.
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#5
Fouquin
LionheartI want one of these for the right price (rolls eyes), can someone enlighten me, where are the DIMM/SODIMM slots?
UskompufThe memory is included in the processor package, with the 4700S 8 GB and 16 GB varients were available.
It's arranged on the back of the board, not integral to the SoC.

Posted on Reply
#6
Mussels
Freshwater Moderator
These have got to be a DIY dev kit for the game devs


I cant see much else of a purpose for them
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#7
Chaitanya
M.2 seems like either for wifi or only 2230 sized one.
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#8
watzupken
They can sell it if they price is right. But it is quite expensive, and with something like a 5600G being a more capable and budget solution, there is little reason to go for a Zen 2 processor and with fixed components that people can't change, and is not ideal for a general purpose PC.
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#9
RedBear
JismThe revision offers PCI-E 4.0 and is no longer a bottleneck compared to the previous gen, that was capped at PCI-E 3.0 X2 or X4.
Actually it was Gen 2 X4, like the article mentions. Honestly I wonder what was the point with the 4700S now, the only real advantage is the smaller form factor, but the old PCIe interface and lack of M2 slots always felt like artificially imposed limits. Maybe AMD has negotiated a better deal with Sony (or Microsoft?) that allows them to make these defective APUs more palatable?
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#10
Fouquin
MusselsThese have got to be a DIY dev kit for the game devs


I cant see much else of a purpose for them
Die harvests. They made tens of millions of these chips, and now they have piles of them that don't make the grade to go into a completed console. Just an easy way to get otherwise wasted CPUs out to market.
ChaitanyaM.2 seems like either for wifi or only 2230 sized one.
There's a 2280 M.2 to the right of the CPU.
Posted on Reply
#11
ixi
AsRockLike a stab in the face.
Why so?
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#12
Chaitanya
FouquinDie harvests. They made tens of millions of these chips, and now they have piles of them that don't make the grade to go into a completed console. Just an easy way to get otherwise wasted CPUs out to market.



There's a 2280 M.2 to the right of the CPU.
I was talking about one below pci-e slot.
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#13
Mussels
Freshwater Moderator
ChaitanyaI was talking about one below pci-e slot.
Theres one NVME slot, and one for wifi.
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#14
Chrispy_
Bundling an RX 6600 with it may be the only way they can sell these. The previous version cost too much for what was a one-off, dead-end platform with hobbled features, no flexibility and no future.

At $400, the 4700S was the same price as a full-fat 3700X (~$300), a half-decent B450 board ($70) and 8GB kit ($30) Why the hell would anyone buy a slower CPU that also can't really support a dGPU properly, on a board that sucks with zero upgrade prospects instead for the same money?

Worse than that, the 4700S is nowhere near a fair comparison for the 3700X. Whilst it shares the same 8C/16T configuration, it has only a quarter of the L3 cache and runs at lower clocks. In tests (THG took a look at one of the kits) it was a good 30% slower, not even outpacing the far older 2700X and the $200 R5 3600 would handily beat it even in multi-threaded workloads despite two fewer cores.

So, it's a turd on paper and the real-world performance makes the on-paper spec look good.
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#16
silentbogo
Too bad those are harvested rejects.
Would be nice to see a fully functional mainstream product like this w/ iGPU enabled, something similar to Subor Z+ (which in 2018 was deemed "too expensive", but today sounds like a real steal).
I think the only issues it had were software-related (unified memory bugs). I'm sure GDDR6 in a main pool is awesome, but what's the point if 100% of it is going to be used as system memory.
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#17
Jomale
A modded passive device could perhaps possible?
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#18
Valantar
MusselsThese have got to be a DIY dev kit for the game devs


I cant see much else of a purpose for them
As mentioned above, these are harvested dice. You can't build a console dev kit from a harvested defective die.
RedBearActually it was Gen 2 X4, like the article mentions. Honestly I wonder what was the point with the 4700S now, the only real advantage is the smaller form factor, but the old PCIe interface and lack of M2 slots always felt like artificially imposed limits. Maybe AMD has negotiated a better deal with Sony (or Microsoft?) that allows them to make these defective APUs more palatable?
I think they just lacked the general purpose PCIe lanes on that chip to make it feasible. Sony has its own storage controller after all, and both the m.2 slot and on-board flash reportedly go through that. That controller likely has a PCIe interface of some sort, but it might not be capable of anything but storage, and might not even natively support NVMe storage - depends how they configured the interface on the die. To me the 4700S seemed like a clear case of an "eh, well, I guess we can try to make this useful despite its massive limitations" scenario. It's a bit of a shame, as that CPU with at least some decent I/O would have been pretty good (at the right price).
Chrispy_Bundling an RX 6600 with it may be the only way they can sell these. The previous version cost too much for what was a one-off, dead-end platform with hobbled features, no flexibility and no future.

At $400, the 4700S was the same price as a full-fat 3700X (~$300), a half-decent B450 board ($70) and 8GB kit ($30) Why the hell would anyone buy a slower CPU that also can't really support a dGPU properly, on a board that sucks with zero upgrade prospects instead for the same money?

Worse than that, the 4700S is nowhere near a fair comparison for the 3700X. Whilst it shares the same 8C/16T configuration, it has only a quarter of the L3 cache and runs at lower clocks. In tests (THG took a look at one of the kits) it was a good 30% slower, not even outpacing the far older 2700X and the $200 R5 3600 would handily beat it even in multi-threaded workloads despite two fewer cores.

So, it's a turd on paper and the real-world performance makes the on-paper spec look good.
You're not entirely wrong, but you can't discount the effect of slow GDDR on CPU performance either. CPUs need latency more than bandwidth, so GDDR for a CPU is just begging for a performance loss. IMO that's as much of the fault for the poor CPU performance as the smaller caches - remember, the mobile/desktop APUs have similarly small caches and perform well still.

This, given that it has some useful I/O, might actually be useful, but they really need to sell these dirt cheap. Making use of rejected silicon is a good thing, but the pricing needs to reflect its capabilities. Still, these could make for some really nice internet cafe rigs in China, for example - small, decent performance, low power, easily put together, and hopefully cheap. Outside of that these don't make all that much sense though.
ChaitanyaI was talking about one below pci-e slot.
That looks like a PCIe x1 slot to me.
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#19
RedBear
ValantarI think they just lacked the general purpose PCIe lanes on that chip to make it feasible. Sony has its own storage controller after all, and both the m.2 slot and on-board flash reportedly go through that. That controller likely has a PCIe interface of some sort, but it might not be capable of anything but storage, and might not even natively support NVMe storage - depends how they configured the interface on the die. To me the 4700S seemed like a clear case of an "eh, well, I guess we can try to make this useful despite its massive limitations" scenario. It's a bit of a shame, as that CPU with at least some decent I/O would have been pretty good (at the right price).
It's possible, I guess we'll have to wait for more details about the 4800S before knowing for sure, but even in that case the problem is how they solved this possible issue, reportedly the 4700s uses an AMD A77E, a pre-Ryzen 2014-circa chipset. Honestly I thought that they were capping the performance on purpose, I assumed that Sony didn't want people to use their SoC, even without graphics, in a PC capable to accept a decent graphic card, but this new 4800S makes me wonder whether it was the case or not.
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#20
Casecutter
Sure, as some DYI offering not much, but in this Mini-ITX for an OEM company this could find usage. I'd want risers for the PCI-E and PCI Express slot, just to be able to lay the graphics and Wi-Fi flat to hold the enclosure thin and not a cube. Lastly who what's the RX 6600 a little over the top, big and too high of TDP @ 130W. AMD would be best bundling around 75W graphics card that doesn't eat into 7nm wafer production. If they had this with an RX 560 (14nm Polaris 21) with a single fan cooler, that would be plenty for most network, internet, cloud-based builds to drive big monitors.
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#21
Jism
silentbogoToo bad those are harvested rejects.
Eh you know that any Intel or AMD CPU or even GPU you buy is potentially a reject?

Yields for full chips does'nt exist. A wafer will always have parts with certain errors and because of that lower core or lower clocked variants from the original, bigger die are extracted.

If i'm correct 10.000$ is paid for a generic wafer; that could contain up to 255 or so worth of "die's". Your not going to throw away the semi working ones. You just downgrade them as lower class with hardware laser cuts to prevent them from being activated again. This way they extract as much as possible from one wafer.
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#22
silentbogo
JismEh you know that any Intel or AMD CPU or even GPU you buy is potentially a reject?
I know where babies come from. All I want is iGPU that can actually play games.
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#23
Mussels
Freshwater Moderator
silentbogoI know where babies come from. All I want is iGPU that can actually play games.
Ah, you want an Xbox! :P
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#24
Valantar
silentbogoI know where babies come from. All I want is iGPU that can actually play games.
Current APUs are actually pretty decent, though obviously you can't expect 1080p high or ultra in anything demanding. I recently saw a "leak" (to be taken with the requisite amount of salt, obviously) of a possible Rembrandt/ 6000-series AMD APU (8c8t Z3, unknown no. of RDNA2 CUs) scoring 2700 in Time Spy, placing it ~200 points ahead of a 1050 Ti and ~600 points behind a 1650. Now, a 1650 is hardly a powerful GPU, but an APU beating a 1050 Ti is still pretty good, and a significant improvement over current APUs. Looking forward to seeing what DDR5 and RDNA2 brings to APUs.
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#25
Selaya
MusselsAh, you want an Xbox! :P
wtb xbox w/ unlocked uefi bootloader
GIMME
NAO
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